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    I recently registered as a new patient at my local surgery and saw my doctor(a woman).

    I was not actually sick but still had a chit chat with her.

    I was then seen by a nurse practitioner(also a woman) who asked questions about my health,measured my height and then had my urine tested.

    I know doctors are able to diagnose and prescribe medication, likewise, nurse practitioners are able to do the same?

    Nure practitioners also run clinics to promote public health

    I have heard that nurse practitioner is something that has not been regulated by the NMC? but i am not quite sure what that means.
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    The difference between nurse practitioners and doctors is something that has been much discussed already on TSR.It will vary hugely between different contexts and different levels of doctors.The role of nurse practitioner is not something that is directly recognised by the NMC, per se. The only thing that officially appears on the register is that the nurse has achieved their supplementary prescribing qualification - something which is generally included in a nurse practitioner course.

    Obviously as they are on the register, a nurse practitioner must work within the NMC Code and Standards for Competence. I believe the rest of the monitoring is left to each nurse practitioner's employer. Given the varying contexts nurse practitioners can work, this is potentially the best way of doing it, as long as they are monitored closely.
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    The difference between nurse practitioners and doctors is something that has been much discussed already on TSR.It will vary hugely between different contexts and different levels of doctors.The role of nurse practitioner is not something that is directly recognised by the NMC, per se. The only thing that officially appears on the register is that the nurse has achieved their supplementary prescribing qualification - something which is generally included in a nurse practitioner course.

    Obviously as they are on the register, a nurse practitioner must work within the NMC Code and Standards for Competence. I believe the rest of the monitoring is left to each nurse practitioner's employer. Given the varying contexts nurse practitioners can work, this is potentially the best way of doing it, as long as they are monitored closely.
    very few prescribers are Supplementary Prescribers , most are Independent Prescriber,s supplementary prescribing died a quiet and unlamented death ...
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    Doctors earn way more, get more respect
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    (Original post by shanktheopps)
    Doctors earn way more, get more respect
    "Get more respect" oooooo what a kick in stomach! LOW BLOW LOW BLOW!

    They don't at all. Unless you're the ignorant one that actually has different levels of respect for medical professionals. Which is like so 1990s
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    (Original post by shanktheopps)
    Doctors earn way more, get more respect
    What Is this, the 50s?
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    very few prescribers are Supplementary Prescribers , most are Independent Prescriber,s supplementary p escribing died a quiet and unlamented death ...
    Still as fastidious as always, I see...
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    Still as fastidious as always, I see...
    carry on running your peers down ...

    you are actually aware of what supplementary prescribing was / is ? and how it was actually completly unnecessary in the way it was used
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    (Original post by shanktheopps)
    Doctors earn way more, get more respect
    Apart from that, obviously.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    carry on running your peers down ...

    you are actually aware of what supplementary prescribing was / is ? and how it was actually completly unnecessary in the way it was used
    Only a bit of banter, Zip!
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    Nurse practitioners can't deal with pregnant ladies and children I believe


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    (Original post by LeeDJC)
    Nurse practitioners can't deal with pregnant ladies and children I believe


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    Er, the former would depend on the context. The latter, yes they definitely can as there are many paediatric nurse practitioner roles.
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    Er, the former would depend on the context. The latter, yes they definitely can as there are many paediatric nurse practitioner roles.
    Ok, so a NP (or any other IP) can't prescribe for a disease or ailment relating to their pregnancy, therefore in General Practice pregnant women are generally avoided - it's just easier that way.

    Although there may be paeds NPs, this would be highly unusual in General Practice.

    So, you're right, but in the context of the original post... so was I P




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    (Original post by LeeDJC)
    Ok, so a NP (or any other IP) can't prescribe for a disease or ailment relating to their pregnancy, therefore in General Practice pregnant women are generally avoided - it's just easier that way.

    Although there may be paeds NPs, this would be highly unusual in General Practice.

    So, you're right, but in the context of the original post... so was I P




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    "Nurse practitioners" and "practice nurses" are very different roles though, so they mustn't be confused.
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    "Nurse practitioners" and "practice nurses" are very different roles though, so they mustn't be confused.
    Agreed

    However, NPs are being used in General Practice as cheap doc replacements.

    It's not uncommon to see them working in consultation rooms dealing with acute (and sometimes chronic) problems.

    Not really what the role was designed for, but cheaper for the Practice.


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    The role of an NP seems to be very varied here, as far as I know you can take the V300 course and depending on which area you have expertise in you are able to prescribe all of the drugs in said category.

    In north america NP's are able to asses and diagnose but they are not allowed to prescribe certain drugs ex. specific classes of narcotics (can't remember exactly). NP's cannot open their own clinics, though I believe in some states they can.


    They are both highly respected professions
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    (Original post by LeeDJC)
    Nurse practitioners can't deal with pregnant ladies and children I believe


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    you are only about twenty five years out of date with that kind of stuff ...

    try again when you actually have an understanding of the role


    wrt to prescribing -https://www2.rcn.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/443627/Nurse_Prescribing_in_the_UK_-_RCN_Factsheet.pdf

    the prescribing in pregnancy stuff is related to the competencies of the RN with regard to Midwifery/ obstetric practice - i.e. they don't have any unless they are an RM as well; well 3 weeks as first year student ... but that doesn't count.
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    Er, the former would depend on the context. The latter, yes they definitely can as there are many paediatric nurse practitioner roles.
    ANNPs have replaced middle grade doctors in a lot of maty units and NICUs
 
 
 
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