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    Hiya guys.
    I know you may of heard this 1000's of times but i really need your help.
    I had my medical a couple of weeks ago and i have been made TMU'd. so i am using the extra time to work on my fitness. i have to do the following.

    1.5 mile (2.4km) run on a treadmill on 0%incline within 13.47mins.
    9 press ups in 1 min
    29 situps in 1 min

    I can do
    11 pressups.
    25 situps.
    But i am really bad at the run. My legs get so tired so quickly. i have even gone as far as to hire a treadmill but nothing is working. yesterday i ran
    400m 2mins rest. 400m 2 mins rest. i kept doing this for 2km then i felt sick so i stopped. i was running at speed 10.7 which is the speed i need to do the full 1.5miles in the time specified. ANY help and advice at all would be very much appreciated. Or a programme that is roughly 6 weeks long. i will also add that i am in a position to go swimming 1 time a week as well.

    Thank you
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    Ideally you want to be running outside a fair bit rather than relying on the treadmill. I'd only really recommend it for speed training.
    I've you do keep using the treadmill then set it to a one or two percent incline as you'll find it slightly easier on the day of the test.

    If you can get out & join a local running club then definitely do; this is what I did & I saw my fitness improve noticeably. If you're free on Saturday mornings then I recommend also doing Park Runs which are available in most cities & major towns. Use Google to find the nearest one; they're 5k so are good for improving both speed & endurance.

    If I remember correctly, you can use your headphones while running on the treadmill so come up with a decent playlist if possible that'll keep you motivated.

    Good luck & the more training you can do in general the easier everything is. Increase your swimming if you can but try not to panic & over train as this can lead to injuries.
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    I've struggled much the same as you. This time last year I couldn't jog 400m but now I can do a mile.
    It sounds stupid but the only way to improve running is to run. I had a 2 mile circuit in my area and all I did was try and get around it. Don't worry about how fast you're going, just try and get around it. However, you must not ever stop. A quick walk is the same pace as a quick jog. Keep your heart rate up or it will be more difficult to restart.
    A positive of a marked route is that you can notice an improvement in real terms. For me, it was being able to jog to one lamppost further than last time. It's encouraging.
    Half of the battle is in your head and you shouldn't get discouraged. Some runs are better than others, just be pleased you got out and tried.
    Good luck.

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    Interval training. Outdoors. Daily.
    You don't need a long distance, a mile, mile and a half, is plenty.
    In 3 weeks you could be at least a minute faster.
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    If you're not used to running then you're going to suffer trying to do the test pace from the off. Since you have time, start off at a slower speed that you feel you can manage for a long time. If you've got a heart-rate monitor then this is ideal to measure your effort levels, do research on HR training zones and stay in Z3. Soon your fitness and running technique will improve and you'll be making the grade in no time.

    Smashing high speeds for your fitness level straight away is not productive and will just make you feel rubbish!
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    I want to thank you all very much for taking the time to reply. all your advice has been invaluable and it will all be taken on board. i will let you know how i get on in my process. again thank you
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    But don't go too quickly too soon. I injured my knee quite badly from a half marathon when I hadn't done that much running before.
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    I can easily do the run on the treadmill and also reach the level for pass on the bleep test but need to work on running the 1.5mile outside.
    I can do more sit ups then needed too but my only down fall is press-ups. I recently was lucky enough to join a RM PTI when he carried out a fitness test on a station. Completed the bleep test and then went onto sit ups, then press ups. By this point I could do 12 press ups, but the PTI said my arms weren't quite at 90 degrees. Since then I have been trying my hardest to get as low as possible but not been able to get close to the amount I need to pass.

    How has everyone else been training for press ups to improve their standard? And what is everyone else experience at the PJFT? How strict are the fitness trainers, considering they aren't part of the armed forces? Although I do want to get as low as possible to stop any problems being caused once I get to Halton.
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    (Original post by TifSade)
    I can easily do the run on the treadmill and also reach the level for pass on the bleep test but need to work on running the 1.5mile outside.
    I can do more sit ups then needed too but my only down fall is press-ups. I recently was lucky enough to join a RM PTI when he carried out a fitness test on a station. Completed the bleep test and then went onto sit ups, then press ups. By this point I could do 12 press ups, but the PTI said my arms weren't quite at 90 degrees. Since then I have been trying my hardest to get as low as possible but not been able to get close to the amount I need to pass.

    How has everyone else been training for press ups to improve their standard? And what is everyone else experience at the PJFT? How strict are the fitness trainers, considering they aren't part of the armed forces? Although I do want to get as low as possible to stop any problems being caused once I get to Halton.
    It my experience, press-ups are by far the easiest exercise in your RAFFT to improve in a short space of time.

    It's always better to artificially handicap yourself to be on the safe side - go all the way down until your nose (gently) touches the ground & then raise up as far as you can physically go until your arms lock out. Press-ups can be done quite easily whenever you get a free minute.
    At this stage it doesn't matter massively how many you can do in a min but more on form. Practice several times a day & you'll see an improvement in no time.
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    (Original post by Tempest II)
    It my experience, press-ups are by far the easiest exercise in your RAFFT to improve in a short space of time.

    It's always better to artificially handicap yourself to be on the safe side - go all the way down until your nose (gently) touches the ground & then raise up as far as you can physically go until your arms lock out. Press-ups can be done quite easily whenever you get a free minute.
    At this stage it doesn't matter massively how many you can do in a min but more on form. Practice several times a day & you'll see an improvement in no time.
    I am probably the last person to ask for advice on fitness training. But here is what i did. when i first started i honestly rhought it was pressups that would let me down. this is because i couldnt even do 1 pressup. i started at a higher incline and went down till my arms were 90 degrees. every week i lowered the incline until i was on the floor. But still keeping my arms going down at 90 degrees. By the time i got to the floor my arms knew where they had to be because of muscle memory. i downloaded the app 100 pushups and i am now following that.

    Has anybody got any week menu plans for running as i think my biggest problem as to why i am struggling with the run is down to food and hydration. thank you
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    (Original post by RAF Hopeful)
    I am probably the last person to ask for advice on fitness training. But here is what i did. when i first started i honestly rhought it was pressups that would let me down. this is because i couldnt even do 1 pressup. i started at a higher incline and went down till my arms were 90 degrees. every week i lowered the incline until i was on the floor. But still keeping my arms going down at 90 degrees. By the time i got to the floor my arms knew where they had to be because of muscle memory. i downloaded the app 100 pushups and i am now following that.

    Has anybody got any week menu plans for running as i think my biggest problem as to why i am struggling with the run is down to food and hydration. thank you

    I followed the couch to 10k running plan. Even though I only started it a few weeks ago, I can now easily get around the track twice without wanting to stop and die. Still a way to go but if you keep on top of the training then it will improve.
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    (Original post by TifSade)
    I followed the couch to 10k running plan. Even though I only started it a few weeks ago, I can now easily get around the track twice without wanting to stop and die. Still a way to go but if you keep on top of the training then it will improve.
    I really hope so. im just getting so deflated when i go on and my legs get so tired after a couple of mins
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    (Original post by RAF Hopeful)
    I really hope so. im just getting so deflated when i go on and my legs get so tired after a couple of mins
    I know what you mean! I was the same, still am, but it's so rewarding when I realise I ran further then my last run. Weather it's and extra 100m on the track or passing 1 or 2 extra lamp posts. Definitely having realistic goals set for yourself and then reaching them feels good. Run 3 days a week and make sure you have 2 rest days and 2 low impact cardio days. Plenty online programs and beat is to run outside as its so different to running on a treadmill.

    Good luck!
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    A lot of the tiredness you're feeling will be in your head. It's psychological not physical so you need to push through the thought of being tired.
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    (Original post by RAF Hopeful)
    I really hope so. im just getting so deflated when i go on and my legs get so tired after a couple of mins
    Hello Hopeful,

    The 1.5mile run is primarily a test of aerobic capacity. It looks to measure your VO2 Max; the maximum rate that you can take on and use oxygen.

    In order to improve your performance at the test you need to concentrate on two key areas. The first is improving your endurance, the second is improving your aerobic power.

    To improve your endurance you need to start running regularly (at least 3-4 times a week), and slowly increase your mileage. These runs don't have to be hard - you should be able to chat while running, and finish feeling that you could definitely do another 10 minutes at least. One run a week should be a 'long run', and try to build these runs up to be one hour in duration.

    The key session for aerobic power is a tempo run. Warm up for 10-15 minutes with some light jogging, then run for 20 mins at a 'comfortably hard pace' (obviously this'll be a bit slower than your 1.5mile pace). You should be out of breath, and would struggle to speak other than to gasp the odd word. At the end, you should feel that you could run for another couple of minutes - but you'd rather not! Then another 10-15 minutes of cooling down and stretching.

    You can do some interval training if you wish - but the tempo run will be more use for the 1.5mile test. However, your intervals shouldn't be much quicker than the pace that you run the 1.5mile test as a whole. It's primarily useful for getting used to the pace, and for recruiting additional nerve fibres in your running style. It's not a great aid for getting fitter for the test.

    Swimming is a great form of cross training. If you can find a 'general fitness' class that works for you (circuit training, british mil fitness etc) then one or two sessions a week will help you develop strength & flexibility, and will reduce your chance of injury.

    If you're looking for a training programme, then have a look at RunnersWorld.co.uk, and pick up one of their 5km schedules. You'd also be very well advised to go running with others; have a look for a local running club and you'll come on in leaps and bounds.
 
 
 
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