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    I need help with cellular molecular biology.

    If a protein complex is looking express a gene and it encounters a recessive allele, what happens next ? Is it the case that the other allele must be found in case the other one is dominant ? How easy would it be to find the other allele ?

    Suppose the other allele is also recessive. What happens then ? How is a decision made as to which recessive allele is expressed ?
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    (Original post by Clive Delmonte)
    I need help with cellular molecular biology.

    If a protein complex is looking express a gene and it encounters a recessive allele, what happens next ? Is it the case that the other allele must be found in case the other one is dominant ? How easy would it be to find the other allele ?

    Suppose the other allele is also recessive. What happens then ? How is a decision made as to which recessive allele is expressed ?
    Recessive alleles are usually recessive because there is something wrong with it. What I mean by this is, the protein that is made is non functional in some way. This non function can be harmless or harmful (eg if you have something wrong with the CFTR protein then you get cystic fibrosis). So what happens is, both alleles are almost always expressed, regardless of whether they're dominant or recessive, if you are heterozygous, then the dominant protein masks the effect of the recessive protein (because the dominant protein is functional, so you'll see the result of that functionality). So imagine you have 2 builders and you want a wall built, if one builder sits out and does nothing (recessive allele), the wall will still be built because the other builder (dominant allele) is still there. You only see the effect of the non-functioning protein if there is no dominant (functional) protein to mask the effects of the non functioning protein. Eg if neither builders build the wall then you won't get a wall built. So it's not a case of finding the other allele to make sure it's dominant, the body has no way of telling if an allele is dominant or recessive, you can only tell once the proteins have been expressed. Does that make sense?
 
 
 
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