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Expensive first car or a cheap one ? watch

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    I passed my driving in February and it took me just under 100 lessons altogether, I passed on my 5th time.

    As a first car, would it be better if I get a good one worth 2500(61 plate) which id keep for a few years or a decent one worth 1500(06-07 plate) which id replace after a year or
    2.

    I have my heart set on the 61 plate corsa but my parents are telling me to reconsider as they want me to drive a bad car to gain confidence and experience. Insurance will be a similar price for both cars of those cars, not much difference.
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    It really depends on the condition of the car - both in good condition should be reliable and last. Buying a secondhand car, the biggest consideration would be having someone capable of inspecting it, so you don't buy a lemon.

    I don't know what your parents mean by 'bad', but I'd want a safe (good crash test results) one. You should also consider additional driver training - it could lower insurance premiums, and should help keep you safe.
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    Judging by your driving experience, I'd probably say start out on something s***y.
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    It doesn't matter is a car 3, 5, 10 ,or 15 years old. If they are in good condition (actually obsolete models, that heavily use technolgies and parts that date back to 80ties, are more reliable), they can serve you for years.
    Remember that cars have to be maintained. It costs quite a lot of money, espeacially if it's a big, complicated model.

    Take as much driving lessons of this kind as you can:
    https://youtu.be/8pMGF30zJhU?t=1m47s

    This will significantly improve your safety.
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    (Original post by PTMalewski)
    It doesn't matter is a car 3, 5, 10 ,or 15 years old. If they are in good condition
    Agreed - buy on condition, but don't ignore safety features, e.g. ABS, airbags, crash ratings.
    (Original post by PTMalewski)
    (actually obsolete models, that heavily use technolgies and parts that date back to 80ties, are more reliable)
    From a safety point of view, I wouldn't go that old. Electronic ignition / engine management / fuel injection wasn't that common in the early 80s, and that makes a huge difference to reliability.
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    (Original post by RogerOxon)
    Agreed - buy on condition, but don't ignore safety features, e.g. ABS, airbags, crash ratings.
    Agreed, though ABS is overrated. It's not that hard to learn emergency braking without it.

    (Original post by RogerOxon)
    Electronic ignition / engine management / fuel injection wasn't that common in the early 80s, and that makes a huge difference to reliability
    I meant cars that use old engines and simple suspensions, rather than really old cars.
    A car may have electronic multi-point injection, and fulfil Euro 3, 4, 5 or even Euro 6, while whole design comes from early eighties - lower fuel consumption and lower emissions are achieved with fuel injection, different stochiometry, optimized shape of intake end exhaust channels and higher compression ratio.

    The point is that wholly new engines are more likely to use parts designed for programmed obsolescense, and have boarderline thickness of head and cylinder block due to material savings.
    The old, upgraded engines may suffer from bad quality of materials, and badly designed new features such as variable valve timing, but there are some models which have such old engines without such features, only with multipoint injection, and they are least vulnerable to spectacular failures and capable of doing quite high mileage. Also cars made up to about 2005 don't suffer so much from material savings, planned obsolescense, downsizing, and power-race.

    Of course, any engine must be properly maintained, and properly used. Unaware driver may break down anything.
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    (Original post by Redbed)
    I passed my driving in February and it took me just under 100 lessons altogether, I passed on my 5th time.

    As a first car, would it be better if I get a good one worth 2500(61 plate) which id keep for a few years or a decent one worth 1500(06-07 plate) which id replace after a year or
    2.

    I have my heart set on the 61 plate corsa but my parents are telling me to reconsider as they want me to drive a bad car to gain confidence and experience. Insurance will be a similar price for both cars of those cars, not much difference.
    For your first car, id go for something slightly older/less expensive. As a new driver, you are more likely to have the odd scrape, so if you have something older, it wont matter as much.
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    Get something a bit older - having one scrape is bloody annoying but with an older car it'll blend in a little more

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    Depends what kind of a driver you are. If you can feel the car's dimensions, can feel the car overall and predict what is going to happen around you then go for the car you like. Newer does not mean better, especially with second hand vehicles, where you pay for condition and not for age/mileage.
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    (Original post by Redbed)
    I passed my driving in February and it took me just under 100 lessons altogether, I passed on my 5th time.

    As a first car, would it be better if I get a good one worth 2500(61 plate) which id keep for a few years or a decent one worth 1500(06-07 plate) which id replace after a year or
    2.

    I have my heart set on the 61 plate corsa but my parents are telling me to reconsider as they want me to drive a bad car to gain confidence and experience. Insurance will be a similar price for both cars of those cars, not much difference.
    Always go for a worse car for your first, you'll grow to love it for what it is and not be bothered if it does get a knock or a scrape
 
 
 
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