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Is it worth going to university if I want to do Computer Science? watch

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    Hello, I'm currently in year 13 and I think to start applying for universities. I want to go into web development, at the moment I'm learning HTML+CSS and a bit of JQuerry, as soon as I'll get better with those I'll start JavaScript.

    So the question is, is it worth going to universities as I've seen many people without a degree working for good companies?

    I'm not asking because I don't want to go to uni but because I'm not quite confident with my final grades.

    Thank you
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    My partner works in IT for a good company and has no qualifications post school apart from some vocational ones that he's picked up as he's gone along. He's taught himself a lot of things about the field though. Going to uni may not affect whether or not you can do the job but it may affect whether or not you get a job and can climb the career ladder. What are your grades and are you sure that they won't be accepted by a decent uni?
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    What are your grades and are you sure that they won't be accepted by a decent uni?
    My predicted grades are : Maths (C), Physics (D), Hospitality (Merit)

    But the things are getting harder and harder, especially maths it doesn't really make any sense to me with it's trigonometry and lots of graphs and I lose interest learning it.
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    (Original post by device)
    But the things are getting harder and harder, especially maths
    Then don't do a CS degree; it has significant maths content.

    Don't confuse computer science with programming.
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    Hmm it will be difficult with those grades. Have you considered apprenticeships and foundation programs?
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    (Original post by device)
    Hello, I'm currently in year 13 and I think to start applying for universities. I want to go into web development, at the moment I'm learning HTML+CSS and a bit of JQuerry, as soon as I'll get better with those I'll start JavaScript.

    So the question is, is it worth going to universities as I've seen many people without a degree working for good companies?

    I'm not asking because I don't want to go to uni but because I'm not quite confident with my final grades.

    Thank you
    It's possible through vocational courses.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Hmm it will be difficult with those grades. Have you considered apprenticeships and foundation programs?
    I was just thinking about foundation year but didn't make any decisions yet.

    I'm writing the personal statement and I'll send it to some universities, maybe they will have so offers or I don't know..
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Don't confuse computer science with programming.
    So will I not learn to code?
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    (Original post by device)
    So will I not learn to code?
    You will learn some coding, but I suggest you take a detailed look at the course content before applying. CS contains a great deal of highly theoretical science about computing (the clue is in the name). While this is useful for a future coder, it is not essential and you may be better off going for something more specifically vocational and directed toward a more immediately practical goal.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    You will learn some coding, but I suggest you take a detailed look at the course content before applying. CS contains a great deal of highly theoretical science about computing (the clue is in the name). While this is useful for a future coder, it is not essential and you may be better off going for something more specifically vocational and directed toward a more immediately practical goal.
    Is worth more doing vocational courses in coding rather than CS at uni? I see what you mean and that affected my choice.

    I would like to go straight into coding, learning programming languages and I would spend 3-4 years at uni only knowing if that's what they do.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Then don't do a CS degree; it has significant maths content.
    Don't confuse computer science with programming.
    This is definitely the crux of the matter. A computing science degree will involve, to varying amounts, discrete mathematics and linear, complex, vector and calculus algebra, both pure and applied. Algorithm design and analysis involves a lot of sequences and series and limits and bounds, and mathematical identities and manipulation thereof, especially where recursion is involved. Computing principles involve a lot of discrete mathematics such as set theory, combinatorics and formal language theory, a precursor to finite-state automata theory, which has huge application in regular expression and complex clocked/looped systems such as games or even just primitive logic circuitry. As well as this, you'll learn programming across all levels, from assembly to C to Python to SQL ad infinitum.

    Of course, different courses will be tailored in different ways. The more you move towards programming alone and applied systems such as databases, towards web development, towards software engineering, towards systems development and analysis... well, the more you move away from theoretical computing. A good course will provide a balance of everything I've mentioned, but the point is that whilst you can tailor your course to your preferences, you can expect at least a base level of learning the true science involved, especially in the earlier years before you can completely branch off. Thus, if you truly have no interest in the science or maths involved and no desire to learn these foundations, then perhaps a fully practical course or internship may serve you better.
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    (Original post by device)
    Hello, I'm currently in year 13 and I think to start applying for universities. I want to go into web development, at the moment I'm learning HTML+CSS and a bit of JQuerry, as soon as I'll get better with those I'll start JavaScript.

    So the question is, is it worth going to universities as I've seen many people without a degree working for good companies?

    I'm not asking because I don't want to go to uni but because I'm not quite confident with my final grades.

    Thank you
    If you want to get into web development then a traditional computer science degree isn't going to be much help.

    Have a read of http://www.ukwda.org/careers-advice/...-web-developer and look at the training courses they offer.

    Alternatively if you want to go down the university route then look into other IT style courses (particularly Business IT/IT for business/organisations are more likely to include sufficient webdev content) - particularly for any courses offering placements.
 
 
 
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