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    Some of you may know that in the US we have the SAT/ACT tests, used to judge our academic ability vs the other students throughout the country. Can someone explain the standardized testing over in the UK? There are a lot of threads about how well/bad people did on their tests, but I don't fully understand the actual test, format, purpose, etc...thanks!
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    At the end of year 11 (equivelant to 10th grade), they take GCSEs. They generally take about 9-11 of them.

    In year 12 (11th grade) they take AS-levels - generally four of them. They take exams at the end of the year. These exams count toward their final "A level" grade.

    Most people drop one subject in year 13 (12th grade), leaving them with three A-levels. Again, they take exams in June and their results from these, combined with their AS exams and any coursework they did, combine to form their final A-level grade.

    Universities give conditional offers based on predicted A-level grades, since students don't find out their results until August. If they don't get the grades required to get into their first choice university, they can go to their second choice (insurance choice) if they got the grades required for that.
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    If they get their results in August, do they go to "uni" that month or the next, or is it for the following year?
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    Uni usually starts in late September/early October that year.
    However, you can defer your entry for a year and take a gap year if you wish.
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    (Original post by mermania)
    Uni usually starts in late September/early October that year.
    However, you can defer your entry for a year and take a gap year if you wish.
    Thanks, that explains another question I had (gap year). Do most students relax or try to get a job/internship?

    Since there is college and uni, does that mean at City there will only be people in the final two years of their undergrad? (Junior and Seniors in the US)
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    (Original post by Syracuse315)
    Thanks, that explains another question I had (gap year). Do most students relax or try to get a job/internship?
    I believe most who actually pre-plan having a gap year use a lot of it for traveling and then boring the rest of us with their rubbish photographs from Vietnam or Thailand, while pretending they found something similar to The Beach, except - as everyone else realises - it was a grotty seaside town populated by some loud ********s from Australia.

    PS - the exams system is different in the majority of schools in Scotland from what is used in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. The differences, however, are unexciting. Just thought I should mention that it isn't entirely UK wide.
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    (Original post by Libertin du Nord)
    Just thought I should mention that it isn't entirely UK wide.
    Nice to know, I'm guessing that it is pretty important to know where things apply (regarding the UK, or only to England, Ireland (Northern and Southern) etc), so I dont offend anyone.
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    (Original post by Syracuse315)
    Nice to know, I'm guessing that it is pretty important to know where things apply (regarding the UK, or only to England, Ireland (Northern and Southern) etc), so I dont offend anyone.
    Och, just wade on in. Some people need a bit of offending.
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    Don't want to be that "ugly American" lol. Although I'm sure I'll have my lapses :p:
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    (Original post by Syracuse315)
    Since there is college and uni, does that mean at City there will only be people in the final two years of their undergrad? (Junior and Seniors in the US)
    No. The American meaning of "college" is nearly always called "university" here. We finish school at 16, but don't start university until 18, college is further education in the two years between finishing school and starting university, and our university places are normally dependent on our results during those two years. Not everyone goes to a college though, some people go to a sixth form which is attached to a school.
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    (Original post by nikki)
    No. The American meaning of "college" is nearly always called "university" here. We finish school at 16, but don't start university until 18, college is further education in the two years between finishing school and starting university, and our university places are normally dependent on our results during those two years. Not everyone goes to a college though, some people go to a sixth form which is attached to a school.
    What type of school is it attached to? How much does the college you go to affect getting into unis?
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    Going to college before university in England is usually for delinquents. Sixth forms are usually part of a private (/'public') school which open up to the public in the last two years. If you are at a good private (/public) school you will generally stay on through sixth form and not really notice any difference.

    About exams - A-Levels and GCSEs are not multiple choice (although Economics AS and maybe some others include a small multiple choice section). Arts subjects are often essay-based; for instance in my recent History A-Level I had to write a coursework essay and four other exam-condition essays (45 minutes each). Maths for instance is worked-through problem solving.
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    About chances: the worse your college or school, the better your chances of gaining admission relative to other similarly qualified applicants.
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    (Original post by Champagne Breakfast)
    About chances: the worse your college or school, the better your chances of gaining admission relative to other similarly qualified applicants.
    Why would that improve your chances?
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    (Original post by wesetters)
    What the hell ? That's all *******s.

    1 - "Going to college before university in England is usually for delinquents."

    Or for people in places where schools don't have 6th forms, or where the 6th forms don't do the subjects they want, or for any other reason. Saying they're all delinquents is, quite frankly, offensive.
    Sorry
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    (Original post by Syracuse315)
    Why would that improve your chances?
    If you go to a good school people have higher expectations, and rightly so, I think people from failing comprehensives and the like who manage to get 3/4 As at A-Level deserve a fricking gold medal.

    Cambridge actually publish their positive discrimination policies regarding GCSEs on their website, maybe someone has a link? That doesn't apply to which college you go to I know but it gives you an idea of the prevailing attitude.
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    There is also all the extra help people from good schools get regarding interviews and personal statements. Also factor in expectations at these schools - Oxbridge application is often seen as the norm whereas at some schools maybe one or two every few years might apply.
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    (Original post by Syracuse315)
    What type of school is it attached to? How much does the college you go to affect getting into unis?
    We normally go to secondary schools between the ages of 11 and 16, and then the 6th form is usually a separated part of the same school for 16-18 year olds.

    It shouldn't make a difference what college or 6th form you go to. A-levels are standardised qualifications so it doesn't make a difference where you get your A-levels from. Except of course better schools have better teaching meaning you have a better chance of getting high grades.
 
 
 
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