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    I wanted to just find out how much extra studying people committed a day, to their A levels during the holidays and school terms. I also wanted to compare it to myself. Some people i know believe there is a direct correlation between doing extra studying (past papers, reading books, re-writing up class notes etc) and success, while others i know do not agree.

    I on the other hand wonder am i studying during my holidays in preparation for A2 levels and wasting my time. A few have claimed it is counterproductive and I’ve been doing since the beginning of summer term

    Of course as most here are Oxford students, success is your middle names so who best to ask?

    How much hours of extra studying did you do at A levels? If you did a little extra studying and got top grades, would you advise others not to worry with the it too much? Is summer holidays A2 preparation work useful or pointless?

    Thanks
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    I didn't do any but it's surely bound to help? If you get all your AS notes written out in a way that allows you to easily refer back to them, if you read the new texts for English or study some of the stuff for science A2s, then you're bound to save time reading or studying the following year, or panicking before A2 papers/synoptics because you've forgotten stuff you learnt two years ago.

    Don't do too much though as it's not essential! I doubt most of us did any. Have fun - much more important for resting your head in prep for next year! It's summer. =)
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    If you mean including homework and everything maybe 45 minutes a day. If you mean above and beyond the call of duty, bugger all. However I did a lot of reading and things for politics and a bit for economics because they interested me, but that had nothing to do with A levels so I don't know if it counts or not.
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    I did practically none so don't worry. When I went for interviews, there were some people that had obviously done a lot of preparation/done lots of extra reading, but I got through without any. They're looking for you to think on your feet anyway so you don't need to do loads of extra work for it really. As above, just enjoy the rest of your summer.
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    I found with others that if you work hard ALL year round you're burnt out when exams come round. I did more work than most for Alevels in term time (ie i actually did my homework!) but nothing more, during holidays, didnt do much, but tried to read over a few notes, but went mental at exam time revising. If you do too much all year, you'll get bored too, cos you've read the same dam thing 50 times.

    I'd enjoy the first part of the year, then gradually build up amount of revision you do towards exam time.

    You've got to enjoy yourself too!
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    so the general conseuens is a no, but if i am enjoying it (i know, i must be an oddball) should i still calm myself down? I think i just love learning and being ahead of others, which i know is awful.
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    (Original post by Erzan)
    so the general conseuens is a no, but if i am enjoying it (i know, i must be an oddball) should i still calm myself down? I think i just love learning and being ahead of others, which i know is awful.
    If you enjoy it then go for it! It's only likely to burn you out if it becomes a chore. Personally, I didn't do much beyond the homework that was set, though i used to spend a good few hours a night doing it. I did a little bit of additional stuff because I realised I needed to. I taught myself some further maths and did some reading of books, but mainly during the summer between finishing my A levels and starting uni, rather than before that. In summary, I didn't do a huge amount, but some. I am definitely one of those that believes the more effort you put in the better will be your success. If you enjoy it then you go for it, why stop?
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    :rofl: We have the identical thread in 'Cambridge'
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    I did most of my work at school. And since I choose science and maths at A-level, work was minimal!
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    i did none. well, i spent about 15 minutes a night maybe (at the most) doing homework. obviously, as well, when i had coursework to do, that was a little more. but yeah, generally, i didnt do anything beyond a little homework.

    you shouldnt really have to work for a levels. theyre super easy.
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    (Original post by heliotrope)
    i did none. well, i spent about 15 minutes a night maybe (at the most) doing homework. obviously, as well, when i had coursework to do, that was a little more. but yeah, generally, i didnt do anything beyond a little homework.

    you shouldnt really have to work for a levels. theyre super easy.
    I agree with them not being very difficult, but super easy? I think that is slightly pretentious to be fair.
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    (Original post by heliotrope)
    i did none. well, i spent about 15 minutes a night maybe (at the most) doing homework. obviously, as well, when i had coursework to do, that was a little more. but yeah, generally, i didnt do anything beyond a little homework.

    you shouldnt really have to work for a levels. theyre super easy.
    Maybe I'm just slightly backwards, but I've never found any school or university examination super easy. I've always had to put a lot of hours to feel satisfied with how it's doing. Maybe you're exceptional, but I think for the majority a lot of hours of work would be required to be at the level necessary for Oxbridge (ie high As in all 3 subjects)
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    i worked maybe 2 and a half hours most nights, including maybe a half hour/forty five minutes dossing about during upper sixth.
    I started revision during the easter holidays, and tried to 'work' six or seven hours a day, although in practice, i procrasinated loads during this time.
    During study leave, i was working similar amounts with similar levels of procrastination depending on the exam in hand.

    Basically, don't worry if it seems you're doing more work than others- like stu, i wouldn't feel happy or satisfied with myself if i hadn't worked as much and this way i know i can't have any regrets because i know i've done my best. It would really suck to miss your oxford offer or whatever and be left wondering if putting a bit more effort in to your revision might have made all the difference.
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    Basically i set my stumbleupon favourites to represent the course i was applying for (physics). If you include the amount of time i spent stumbling as working - then i probably worked more than anyone else in my year

    Seriously though i find that the returns on extra revision diminish rapidly the more you revise - those last few UMS can take hours of study, at least for me.
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    (Original post by F1 fanatic)
    Maybe I'm just slightly backwards, but I've never found any school or university examination super easy. I've always had to put a lot of hours to feel satisfied with how it's doing. Maybe you're exceptional, but I think for the majority a lot of hours of work would be required to be at the level necessary for Oxbridge (ie high As in all 3 subjects)
    it doesnt matter what your As are, or at least it didnt when i did it. my a levels were a high A in one of the subjects of my joint honours and two average As in subjects completely unrelated. theyre just exams, yknow. the subject matter wasnt particularly complex and the amount you needed to know about/needed to be able to apply about said subject wasnt that great to get As.
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    I reckon I averaged 15 minutes homework a night over sixth form, never once touched the Chemistry book outside of a lesson until May of this year. Most of those 15 minutes were spent doing Maths homework or the very occasional bit of Physics, or compounded into our one or two English essays a month. I didn't actually revise Maths or Physics except for the night before this summer (although I did do a lot of Chemistry and English as was more concerned about them). I only had a couple of free periods at school but by no means was I working solidly from 9-3.30 everyday, all of my teachers spent at least a quarter of the lessons (and possibly a lot more!) just chatting with us about random stuff......

    In summary I had a great time at Sixth form, you don't need to work hard in the Summer, the best advice I can give is make sure you are clued up for the interview as I think preparing for that helps significantly. Personally I found the best way to revise effectively in minimal time was to do nothing but past papers (I seldom looked at my notes) and then mark them AND READ the examiners reports of that paper to see where other people went wrong. In some subjects the same stuff comes up year after year, and whole areas of the specification are never touched. Exploit this, I would estimate at least two thirds of most Chemistry questions have been asked at some point in the past five years. If it gets to the stage where you only have a couple of hours to revise, dont do the papers, just go through them with the examiners reports and mark schemes and see where people slip up. Essentially this is why maximal UMS scores dont equal brilliance, they just show hard work, teaching and exam technique imo, I think AEAs are the way forward not A*s...

    Edit: On reflection, 15 minutes is not that clear. Essentially most weeks I would do nothing, however every now and again I would get Maths that would take 30-45 and the odd essay that would take 2 hours or so. I very seldom got Physics and never got Chemistry homework. This time doesn't include the Maths I did for interview or the Chemistry I did in May and June to make up for my lack of knowledge!
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    (Original post by heliotrope)
    it doesnt matter what your As are, or at least it didnt when i did it. my a levels were a high A in one of the subjects of my joint honours and two average As in subjects completely unrelated. theyre just exams, yknow. the subject matter wasnt particularly complex and the amount you needed to know about/needed to be able to apply about said subject wasnt that great to get As.
    Fair enough, if you can get those As without doing much work then full credit to you. I don't mind admitting that in that case you're a better person academically than I, but then I've always regarded myself as getting into Oxford on effort not talent.
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    1) For most of the year I did nothing - I didn't even do my homework most of the time (they can't make me - I'm A-level ); then at the end, for about one/half weeks during my exams, I did about 3-4 hours revision per day, most days.
    2) No, I haven't done anything in the holiday - and I don't plan on doing any. Though I know a friend who I guess probably has. But she started AS revision at Xmas.
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    It isn't about how long you spend on it, it's about how well you work during that time, and how good you are generally.
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    (Original post by BornUnderPunches)
    1) For most of the year I did nothing - I didn't even do my homework most of the time (they can't make me - I'm A-level ); then at the end, for about one/half weeks during my exams, I did about 3-4 hours revision per day, most days.
    That is so not fair, I got given a work detention for refusing to do a particularly pointless piece of further maths homework *mutters about private schools and their stupid rules* This was after I'd taught myself maths and most of further maths, the school made me rejoin the class for FP2 and 3 so I retaliated by not doing any work. Happy days... Except the detention.
 
 
 
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