What is the difference between a BTEC and A-Level??

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Jazzy4949
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What is the difference between a BTEC and A-Level?? Especially in business studies
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BobBobson
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BTECs in general are more vocational and more focused on the real world, while A Levels is based a lot on theory.
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A8474
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A BTEC is less exam and more practical where as an A-Level is the opposite; more exam and less practical (unless you do a science where you need to complete your PAG assessments)
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Jazzy4949
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(Original post by BobBobson)
BTECs in general are more vocational and more focused on the real world, while A Levels is based a lot on theory.
(Original post by A8474)
A BTEC is less exam and more practical where as an A-Level is the opposite; more exam and less practical (unless you do a science where you need to complete your PAG assessments)
Thanks you too you both. I will probably end up doing A-level now so thank you also what is the difference between Business studies and Economics?? Especially in A-level
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Reality Check
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You do a BTEC if you can't do the A Level. There's lots of soft soap about 'it suits those who are not good at exams' or 'it's more practically based' but overall if you can cut the mustard in it you do the A level, and if the school's worried you might get a low grade and affect the league table for that subject you'll be offered the BTEC.

Source: a wealth of secondary teachers and senior leadership.
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HopelessMedic
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(Original post by Reality Check)
You do a BTEC if you can't do the A Level. There's lots of soft soap about 'it suits those who are not good at exams' or 'it's more practically based' but overall if you can cut the mustard in it you do the A level, and if the school's worried you might get a low grade and affect the league table for that subject you'll be offered the BTEC.

Source: a wealth of secondary teachers and senior leadership.
Or a BTEC may be more relevant to their future career?

Also if you could get onto a uni course with either BTEC or A-level, it would be pointless to pick a levels seeing as they're "harder".
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HurtfulHarold
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A Levels are harder than BTECs as they're more exam based.
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123Master321
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(Original post by HopelessMedic)
Or a BTEC may be more relevant to their future career?

Also if you could get onto a uni course with either BTEC or A-level, it would be pointless to pick a levels seeing as they're "harder".
The 'better' universities only really accept a-level for STEM subjects, which tend to be higher income earning
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Reality Check
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(Original post by HopelessMedic)
Or a BTEC may be more relevant to their future career?

Also if you could get onto a uni course with either BTEC or A-level, it would be pointless to pick a levels seeing as they're "harder".
Yes, but you'd think very differently during Michaelmas Term having done the 'easier' BTEC when you suddenly found there was a huge amount of material in your BTEC which had either been simplified to the point of being meaningless or just omitted all together because it was considered 'too hard' and you are suddenly faced with a Herculean task of remedial work contemporaneously with the degree.

I know it's not fashionable point of view. But I absolutely believe that BTEC are a way of selling students up the river. They are never as suitable a preparation for higher level study than the equivalent A level. I agree with your sentiment that 'A BTEC may be more relevant to their future career' if that career is, for instance, Hairdressing and Beauty Therapy, or Nursery Nursing. But too often BTECs are used as an 'academic' alternative Level 3 qualification for students wholly unsuited to working at that level.
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HopelessMedic
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(Original post by 123Master321)
The 'better' universities only really accept a-level
Better? That's debatable.

But even if that's true, if you could get onto a course/job with a BTEC why would you take a-levels? Also as hard as it may be for you to see some employers prefer BTEC's as they demonstrate practical ability.
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123Master321
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(Original post by HopelessMedic)
Better? That's debatable.

But even if that's true, if you could get onto a course/job with a BTEC why would you take a-levels? Also as hard as it may be for you to see some employers prefer BTEC's as they demonstrate practical ability.
how is oxbridge not better, you say its debatable..
Employers would probably prefer a university degree from a top university
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HopelessMedic
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(Original post by 123Master321)
how is oxbridge not better, you say its debatable..
Employers would probably prefer a university degree from a top university
Is Oxbridge better for all subjects? Does Oxbridge even do every course? The answer is no.

Is a degree better for all jobs? Is a degree required for all jobs? The answer is no.
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hellodave5
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Yes, but you'd think very differently during Michaelmas Term having done the 'easier' BTEC when you suddenly found there was a huge amount of material in your BTEC which had either been simplified to the point of being meaningless or just omitted all together because it was considered 'too hard' and you are suddenly faced with a Herculean task of remedial work contemporaneously with the degree.

I know it's not fashionable point of view. But I absolutely believe that BTEC are a way of selling students up the river. They are never as suitable a preparation for higher level study than the equivalent A level. I agree with your sentiment that 'A BTEC may be more relevant to their future career' if that career is, for instance, Hairdressing and Beauty Therapy, or Nursery Nursing. But too often BTECs are used as an 'academic' alternative Level 3 qualification for students wholly unsuited to working at that level.
I disagree. I did okay in GCSE's and somewhat poorly in A/S levels, but I feel my choice to do a BTEC afterwards served as a considerable vehicle to learning academic skills in a 'friendly' way in that it referred to the real world applications of learned knowledge (I think most early educational experiences should be reflective of the 'real world' ).

In terms of preparation, I felt it was better suited to helping me develop skills required for university - mainly because the BTEC assessments were mostly essay based, as are most university courses as far as I'm aware.

My BTEC was in sports science, now I have a first class degree in psychology and a merit in a masters in cog neuroscience. So I think it would be unfair to say that they are bad, they are usually not. People are different, and I think that the provision of alternative methods of learning is highly auspicious to individuals that don't fit the A level academic system well (those who I assume come from families with low levels of education themselves).

Hope helped to provide some useful insight.
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bigwang
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If you want to become a plumber or mechanic its obviously better to do a BTEC in plumbing, no point stressing out over A levels. Point is that if you want to become an engineer no point pretending that BTEC Engineering is going to prepare you better for an Engineering degree than A Level Maths or Further Maths, not comparable. You're simply lying to yourself if you think BTECs be better in preparing you for any STEM subject at Uni, Oxbridge and some other 'top unis' don't accept them, there's a reason for this. Of course BTEC Media production will be better/comparable to Media Studies A Level, but on the whole BTECs are less academically challenging and the whole "well look I took BTECs and got into a top uni" argument is pretty silly.
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123Master321
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(Original post by HopelessMedic)
Is Oxbridge better for all subjects? Does Oxbridge even do every course? The answer is no.

Is a degree better for all jobs? Is a degree required for all jobs? The answer is no.
Ok fine, but I was referring to the set of jobs that typically associated with higher income brackets, namely STEM subjects for which A-levels are exponentially more useful
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ckfeister
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Here we go...
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A8474
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(Original post by Jazzy4949)
...what is the difference between Business studies and Economics?? Especially in A-level
Refer to these links:

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/busin...s-studies-2130
http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/econo...economics-2140

They should help you see what you'd be facing at A-Level for both subjects.
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Rigby16
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It annoys me when people say i got D*"D*D in Health and social care, that's the same as A* A* A". No, there's a reason it's not called an A* and that's because it is not an A level. If you want an A*, take an 3/4 A-Levels, revise from 4 300 page textbooks in each subject and get 3 A*s. They are a lot harder and require more effort outside of college hours.
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DarthRoar
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TL;DR: BTEC = dumber folk, A Levels = smarter folk.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by DarthRoar)
TL;DR: BTEC = dumber folk, A Levels = smarter folk.
Pretty much.
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