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Which degree is best for progression into a career in research? watch

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    Hi, I had my mind set on Biomedical Science but my teachers are advising me to study something like Biochemistry or more broad like Biology, so I want to really consider which degrees will lead to research (probably medical research or at least biological research) before I apply. Thanks
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    (Original post by GenericPerson2)
    Hi, I had my mind set on Biomedical Science but my teachers are advising me to study something like Biochemistry or more broad like Biology, so I want to really consider which degrees will lead to research (probably medical research or at least biological research) before I apply. Thanks
    Any of them would lead you to a career in research - though I'd say biomedical science would be more desired but much more specific than the others.
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    Look at the requirements for MScs and MRes' :-)
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Any of them would lead you to a career in research - though I'd say biomedical science would be more desired but much more specific than the others.
    Yeah I thought that, but my teachers said biomedical science is too vocational because I want to become a researcher and not a biomedical scientist. But then neither of them have done biomedical science so I don't know how sound their advice is on the matter.
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    (Original post by GenericPerson2)
    Yeah I thought that, but my teachers said biomedical science is too vocational because I want to become a researcher and not a biomedical scientist. But then neither of them have done biomedical science so I don't know how sound their advice is on the matter.
    Really? In top universities the Biomedical Scientists pride themselves in the research they do.
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    did you know that you could do strong and extensive research with a medical degree, branches of medicine that focus solely on research include virology, epidemiology, pathology, etc. Research is very risky, and you could either become a glorified god or no one, so medicine is quite a nice platform to fall back on.
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    (Original post by Anna.Karenina)
    Look at the requirements for MScs and MRes' :-)
    Thanks, I have looked on some websites like New Scientist to see which degrees they want for various job.
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    (Original post by Dominator1)
    did you know that you could do strong and extensive research with a medical degree, branches of medicine that focus solely on research include virology, epidemiology, pathology, etc. Research is very risky, and you could either become a glorified god or no one, so medicine is quite a nice platform to fall back on.
    I considered medicine quite heavily and decided against it in the end, it's too late to apply now anyhow, thanks for the advice though I've been told medicine can lead to clinical research but I know biomedical science / biochemistry can lead to other research too.
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    (Original post by GenericPerson2)
    I considered medicine quite heavily and decided against it in the end, it's too late to apply now anyhow, thanks for the advice though I've been told medicine can lead to clinical research but I know biomedical science / biochemistry can lead to other research too.
    May I ask the reason you've decided against medicine?
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    (Original post by _4everfaithful__)
    Really? In top universities the Biomedical Scientists pride themselves in the research they do.
    I expect they do (I think my teachers are saying that because they don't want me to narrow my options too much), but wouldn't biomedical research be just on diseases? That would be in no way a negative thing for me though as that's an area I'd really like to go in, however with biochemistry can't you get into other jobs like bioinformatics?
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    (Original post by Dominator1)
    May I ask the reason you've decided against medicine?
    Sure! I know I wouldn't like to be a doctor, I don't like needles (minor issue) and I don't think I could deal with the heavy decisions they have about patients to make on a daily basis. I had the AS grades to get into medicine but I wanted to do something more pure science based, like academic research. I was advised by tonnes of people to go for medicine though, but in the end I just don't think it's for me.
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    (Original post by GenericPerson2)
    Yeah I thought that, but my teachers said biomedical science is too vocational because I want to become a researcher and not a biomedical scientist. But then neither of them have done biomedical science so I don't know how sound their advice is on the matter.
    The majority of the better universities do not structure their degrees to meet the requirements for vocational accreditation.

    There is a real diversity of life sciences undergraduate degrees. The particular one you choose is not that relevant (within reason, an ecology degree will probably not get you onto a molecular biology PhD) as there is so much overlap in general knowledge and general lab skills. A lot of my fellow biology students switched to the medical research side of things while a lot of the students on my current biology MRes did biomedical sciences. There is a lot of crossover.

    What is far more important is doing well on your degree, getting good references and getting additional experience.
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    (Original post by GenericPerson2)
    Sure! I know I wouldn't like to be a doctor, I don't like needles (minor issue) and I don't think I could deal with the heavy decisions they have about patients to make on a daily basis. I had the AS grades to get into medicine but I wanted to do something more pure science based, like academic research. I was advised by tonnes of people to go for medicine though, but in the end I just don't think it's for me.
    Fair enough, good luck to you madam.
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    (Original post by GenericPerson2)
    I expect they do (I think my teachers are saying that because they don't want me to narrow my options too much), but wouldn't biomedical research be just on diseases? That would be in no way a negative thing for me though as that's an area I'd really like to go in, however with biochemistry can't you get into other jobs like bioinformatics?
    I'm not too sure myself but I want to do research for diseases (I'm in year 12)
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    (Original post by Dominator1)
    Fair enough, good luck to you madam.
    Thanks very much!!
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    (Original post by _4everfaithful__)
    I'm not too sure myself but I want to do research for diseases (I'm in year 12)
    It's good how you know that so early on, I didn't. Which A levels are you studying?
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    (Original post by Quantex)
    The majority of the better universities do not structure their degrees to meet the requirements for vocational accreditation.

    There is a real diversity of life sciences undergraduate degrees. The particular one you choose is not that relevant (within reason, an ecology degree will probably not get you onto a molecular biology PhD) as there is so much overlap in general knowledge and general lab skills. A lot of my fellow biology students switched to the medical research side of things while a lot of the students on my current biology MRes did biomedical sciences. There is a lot of crossover.

    What is far more important is doing well on your degree, getting good references and getting additional experience.
    That's interesting, my teachers did say that they could lead to similar pathways.
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    I almost always advise doing a general rather than specific degree. First, you might change your mind on what you like best during your degree, and if you are general you can specialise. For example, many biology students might specialise in biomedical or genetics or pharmacology or whatever in their final year. In fact, you might never even come across a particular area of biology that you love if you study the specialised degree.

    Second, I don't think there are many pathways that are only available to the specific degree. Research will typically involve postgraduate training where you will actually specialise in one area.
 
 
 
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