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    (Original post by Squishy)
    It's part of my first-year course, although not my main focus (computer science).
    do you do physical modelling, in that case?
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    (Original post by Squishy)
    Grades permitting.
    Good luck .
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    do you do physical modelling, in that case?
    It's not on the first-year course...I'm supposed to study Physics to broaden my first year...I don't think it's supposed to be related to the main subject.

    (Original post by Nylex)
    Good luck .
    Thanks. (3 weeks to go now)
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    (Original post by Squishy)
    Thanks. (3 weeks to go now)
    No prob. I applied, but didn't make it past the interviews, hehe.
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    (Original post by Nylex)
    No prob. I applied, but didn't make it past the interviews, hehe.
    Having seen the workload for next year, I'd say you were lucky.
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    Bernoulli's Equation is basically the law of energy conservation applied to incompressible, inviscid flow along a streamline.

    Stokes Law for Drag on a Sphere relates the drag coefficient to the Reynolds Number (Re) within the range Re < 1. The Reynolds Number is the ratio of inertial to viscous forces.

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    Thats nice of you to help Shiny, but that is WAY beyond Alevel. However, if you could explain the concept of laminar and turbulent flow through a tube to me, that would be great! I want to know why one will result in a different velocity...
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    (Original post by RobbieC)
    Thats nice of you to help Shiny, but that is WAY beyond Alevel. However, if you could explain the concept of laminar and turbulent flow through a tube to me, that would be great! I want to know why one will result in a different velocity...
    I presume you are talking about the loss of pressure through a pipe?

    Laminar flow - smooth flow, low loss.
    Turbulent flow - likes it sounds is turbulent, lots of eddies and internal mixing, which results in energy dissipation and loss of pressure.

    EDIT: Or do you mean differences in velocity profiles?
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    (Original post by shiny)
    I presume you are talking about the loss of pressure through a pipe?

    Laminar flow - smooth flow, low loss.
    Turbulent flow - likes it sounds is turbulent, lots of eddies and internal mixing, which results in energy dissipation and loss of pressure.

    EDIT: Or do you mean differences in velocity profiles?
    Velocity profiles.

    Ive decided to do a project where I investigate the difference in the viscosity coefficient at different temperatures.

    I was just curious for bg info purposes as to how turbulent flow would prevent a stable equilibrium... Its not clear in my mind.
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    (Original post by RobbieC)
    Velocity profiles.
    It is pretty much the same reasons as for pressure loss. Turbulent flows have a unsteady velocity components which causes mixing and momentum transfer between fluid layers. Consequently a turbulent velocity profile has a steeper velocity gradient near the pipe wall than a laminar flow where there is little momentum transfer between layers (since there is much less flow instability).
 
 
 
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