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Do you think a General Election should be called ASAP? watch

  • View Poll Results: Should a GE be called ASAP?
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    As it seems as though there is a worry that a debate on Article 50 could trigger several by-elections which will reduce the Conservative majority in the Commons should the Prime Minister call a General Election in order to ensure the Government can increase its majority & gain a further mandate?

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016...r-tory-mp-qui/

    The reality is that Labour are in a total shambles at the current time & shouldn't be a threat to Mrs May; the Lib Dems may gain support with their Pro-EU stance but only have 8 MPs currently which means they're also not much of a threat; how UKIP does will depend on how Euroseptic/trustworthy the the Tories are probably perceived to be & how effective they can steal votes off of the Labour seats in northern England.

    Personally I think the PM should take this opportunity to call one - since the 2011 Fixed Term Parliament Act, two-thirds of the Commons will need to approve the request but this should be easy to achieve if both the Tories & Labour support the motion.
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    I agree.

    It will make brexit far smoother and put Labour out if it's misery.
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    (Original post by Tempest II)


    Personally I think the PM should take this opportunity to call one - since the 2011 Fixed Term Parliament Act, two-thirds of the Commons will need to approve the request but this should be easy to achieve if both the Tories & Labour support the motion.
    Labour supported this at a time when there was zero chance May would call an election. Do not assume that Labour would be so accommodating if May needs an election.

    One of the problems with the FTPA is that a weak opposition can keep a government from trying to renew its mandate.

    We do not know whether Bercow or the courts would allow an artificial "no confidence" motion (ie one where the government's own supporters voted "no confidence" in the government) to pass.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Labour supported this at a time when there was zero chance May would call an election. Do not assume that Labour would be so accommodating if May needs an election.

    One of the problems with the FTPA is that a weak opposition can keep a government from trying to renew its mandate.

    We do not know whether Bercow or the courts would allow an artificial "no confidence" motion (ie one where the government's own supporters voted "no confidence" in the government) to pass.
    People say that they could just repeal the Fixed Term Parliament Act but I think the Lords might block that, given that the purpose of the act was to prevent a government tactically calling an election when they are riding high in the polls.
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    Certainty an early GE would be the best thing for Labour, far better to lose now and get rid of Corbyn than lose in 2020. But an early GE would not be good for the country at large - heaven knows what damage a bolstered and increasingly hard-Brexit-minded Tory party could do.
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    Yes, then get Corbyn out of Labour party leadership.
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    Labour wouldn't go for it, so it's a non starter.
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    (Original post by Bornblue)
    People say that they could just repeal the Fixed Term Parliament Act but I think the Lords might block that, given that the purpose of the act was to prevent a government tactically calling an election when they are riding high in the polls.
    But this isn't emergency legislation. It will take months to get through even if they could get it through the Lords.


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    Yes because the referendum only gave a mandate to leave the EU and nothing more.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    But this isn't emergency legislation. It will take months to get through even if they could get it through the Lords.


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    Do the courts have the power to quash a no confidence vote though? Given that Parliament is Supreme and all that.

    I guess technically it wouldn't be an 'act of Parliament'
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    There's no need to abolish the sensible fixed term parliament act- which has a clause that an election msy be held under exceptional circumstances before the end of a term- brexit certainly meets that requirement.
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    It would make sense for May... she doesn't want to make the same mistake that Gordon Brown made. He likely would have won the election when he was in his honeymoon period, and then obviously lost.
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    The self interested person in me says yes. It would likely give us a majority of ~100 and i'm not altogether confident that Corbyn would go (he'd blame it on division).

    On a more sound basis although i felt that there should be an election to ratify the agreement in 2019 the ruling does in my mind give credible grounds to do it now.

    It would be interesting to see what happens if Labour went back on their word and May publicly explained what they had done. They'd be named the enemies of a free democracy.

    Does the Royal Perogative have any theoretical power here? I.e. could May theoretically overide the act if she felt Brexit was exceptional enough a circumstance or would the courts just stop her.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Does the Royal Perogative have any theoretical power here? I.e. could May theoretically overide the act if she felt Brexit was exceptional enough a circumstance or would the courts just stop her.
    I could be wrong but from how I understood the ruling she would not be able to because parliament is sovereign and not the executive or the head of state.

    That said it would be hilarious if the queen refused to give it and came out as an ardent remainer. If that happens I'll get the queen tattooed on me and watch the Daily Mail implode.
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    (Original post by Davij038)
    I could be wrong but from how I understood the ruling she would not be able to because parliament is sovereign and not the executive or the head of state.

    That said it would be hilarious if the queen refused to give it and came out as an ardent remainer. If that happens I'll get the queen tattooed on me and watch the Daily Mail implode.
    I don't think she's allowed to is she?
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    (Original post by KimKallstrom)
    I don't think she's allowed to is she?
    It's a grey area. Technically she can but it's never be done before- but neither's article 50.
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    (Original post by Davij038)
    I agree.

    It will make brexit far smoother and put Labour out if it's misery.
    :naughty:
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    (Original post by Davij038)
    It's a grey area. Technically she can but it's never be done before- but neither's article 50.
    I'd be amazed if she made a comment for or against Brexit.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)

    Does the Royal Perogative have any theoretical power here? I.e. could May theoretically overide the act if she felt Brexit was exceptional enough a circumstance or would the courts just stop her.
    No. It has no actual or theoretical power. The courts would strike it down in an instance.
    The royal prerogative can NEVER be used to override an act of Parliament, no matter what the political considerations are.

    It's the foundation of our legal system, that Parliament is sovereign.
    It was the basis of the court's decision the other day.

    Parliamentary sovereignty ALWAYS trumps the royal prerogative. The royal prerogative is always subject to being curtailed by Parliament if it wishes to do so.
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    (Original post by Davij038)
    It's a grey area. Technically she can but it's never be done before- but neither's article 50.
    She has done it before, in 1708!
 
 
 
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