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    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016...network-named/

    So a french teenager got prosecuted for naming his WiFi after Isis. Surely this comes under the right to free speech.Is it just me but is free speech slowly dying? I don't think that the police should be getting involved in matters such as tweets or instances like the above.
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    (Original post by Robby2312)
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016...network-named/
    I don't think that the police should be getting involved in matters such as tweets or instances like the above.
    Perhaps in this case it was overreaction on stupid joke, but on the other hand he took a lesson that this is serious.

    Lots of people are completely ignorant on many things, so they would walk around in SS uniforms just because they look good, and because of such ignorance they would join neo-nazis or such ISIS for example, after being easily manipulated by them.

    A bigger concern is that we can't criticise often even obvious faults of particular groups or ideologies, without being accused of racism or hate speech. A question is, does any consequences come after such accusations which are spoken sometimes almost automatically.
    Noone nor nothing should be shielded from criticism, only as long as arguments are valid.
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    He should have made an appeal. It's absurd.
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    It was dead along time ago
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    (Original post by Josb)
    He should have made an appeal. It's absurd.
    A hundred hours of community service is not an absurd, though I would rather put a penalty of reading about ISIS' crimes for 100 hours.
    Would you say the same If the guy named his WIFI "Heil Hitler"?
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    (Original post by PTMalewski)
    A hundred hours of community service is not an absurd, though I would rather put a penalty of reading about ISIS' crimes for 100 hours.
    Would you say the same If the guy named his WIFI "Heil Hitler"?
    Yes, I would say the same. A fine is enough in this case. No need to obstruct the judicial and prison systems with such petty crimes.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    Yes, I would say the same. A fine is enough in this case. No need to obstruct the judicial and prison systems with such petty crimes.
    He did got suspended penalty, because he refused to work.
    They actually did nothing to him.
    I agree that fine would have been better, it would hit him more.
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    (Original post by Robby2312)
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016...network-named/

    So a french teenager got prosecuted for naming his WiFi after Isis. Surely this comes under the right to free speech.Is it just me but is free speech slowly dying? I don't think that the police should be getting involved in matters such as tweets or instances like the above.
    The article doesnt say which law he broke.
    You can slander or make inflammatory remarks on twitter as easily as anywhere else. It should depend on what is written and not the media it was transmitted on. I disagree with you, if there was a crime then it should be prosecuted.
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    (Original post by PTMalewski)
    A bigger concern is that we can't criticise often even obvious faults of particular groups or ideologies, without being accused of racism or hate speech. A question is, does any consequences come after such accusations which are spoken sometimes almost automatically.
    Noone nor nothing should be shielded from criticism, only as long as arguments are valid.
    So what if people criticise your point of view, that's what free speech is.

    If someone accuses you of racism they are exercising their right to free speech even if you don't think you are being racist. If you don't agree with them just argue back.

    Plenty of people on TSR make threads all the time criticising Islam and aren't bothered by getting flak for it, so exactly what group are you afraid of critcising?
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    People are very quick to shout about their right to free speech, but they forget that with that also comes responsibilities.
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)

    If someone accuses you of racism they are exercising their right to free speech even if you don't think you are being racist. If you don't agree with them just argue back.
    This is why I've asked what happens next.


    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    Plenty of people on TSR make threads all the time criticising Islam and aren't bothered by getting flak for it, so exactly what group are you afraid of critcising?
    In the UK, none so far (unless I am physically at street, in not the most elegant districts). In Poland I'm afraid to criticise either president or catholic Church, because this may end in court, and I don't have enough money to commit effective bribery.
    On TSR I can't explain to the Holocaust deniers how wrong they are, because their threads are removed before they can read my replies.

    However there are some cases in which political correctness already has done a lot of damage.
    Do you know what is the result of affirmative and protective policy on Aborigines in Australia?
    It worked exactly the opposite it supposed to. People must be criticised for their true faults, or they fall.
    They got a fish and complete censorship of criticism upon them. It had terrible result on their lifestyle (alcohol and drugs) and integration with the rest of society.
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    So what if people criticise your point of view, that's what free speech is.

    If someone accuses you of racism they are exercising their right to free speech even if you don't think you are being racist. If you don't agree with them just argue back.

    Plenty of people on TSR make threads all the time criticising Islam and aren't bothered by getting flak for it, so exactly what group are you afraid of critcising?
    What is unsettling is the connotations that come with racism, as being called a racist automatically turns many ignorant people that would otherwise be quiet to speak out against you. Straw man fallacy
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    The article doesnt say which law he broke.
    You can slander or make inflammatory remarks on twitter as easily as anywhere else. It should depend on what is written and not the media it was transmitted on. I disagree with you, if there was a crime then it should be prosecuted.
    But in this case he didn't actually post on twitter.He named his WiFi daesh or sonething like that and a member of the public reported him.Ok maybe it was stupid but once it was established that the guy is not in fact a terrorist everyone should have just moved on. People shouldn't be prosecuted for tweeting offensive things about islam for example.Nobody has the right not to be offended.And if governments start prosecuting for little things like tweets or facebook posts then it gradually becomes more authoritarian.
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    (Original post by PTMalewski)
    A hundred hours of community service is not an absurd, though I would rather put a penalty of reading about ISIS' crimes for 100 hours.
    Would you say the same If the guy named his WIFI "Heil Hitler"?
    If he named his wiFi Heil hitler then thats pretty offensive but as long as hes not going around harming jews or anything like that then he can name it whatever he wants.Nobody has the right not to be offended.People should just suck it up.
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    You talk as if 'free speech' was some unfettered right. There has never been the right to 'free speech' in the sense of saying what you like - this is an established point of law, in the same was as you are not free to write what you like. Twitter is as subject to these laws as any other written media is.
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    (Original post by Robby2312)
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016...network-named/

    So a french teenager got prosecuted for naming his WiFi after Isis. Surely this comes under the right to free speech.Is it just me but is free speech slowly dying? I don't think that the police should be getting involved in matters such as tweets or instances like the above.
    I was gouing to point out that there are no FoS laws in the UK, but then I see it's in France.

    But freedom of speech means you can speak your mind. Not that you can be deliberately provocative and offensive.
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    The United States is the only nation with actually legally guaranteed freedom of speech any more.
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    (Original post by Robby2312)
    But in this case he didn't actually post on twitter.He named his WiFi daesh or sonething like that and a member of the public reported him.Ok maybe it was stupid but once it was established that the guy is not in fact a terrorist everyone should have just moved on. People shouldn't be prosecuted for tweeting offensive things about islam for example.Nobody has the right not to be offended.And if governments start prosecuting for little things like tweets or facebook posts then it gradually becomes more authoritarian.
    Did you do any research?
    He was allegedly in breach of anti terrorism laws which make it an offence to support or publicly praise terrorists.

    https://translate.googleusercontent....XT000030197078
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    But freedom of speech means you can speak your mind..
    NO! It doesn't at all.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    NO! It doesn't at all.
    Kay then bubelah, what does it mean?
 
 
 
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