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    (Original post by shady lane)
    Being a doctor has nothing to do with healthcare M&A, unless you are in a private health system like the US.

    I know exactly what a doctor does, as my mother is one. I'm tired of you trying to tell me what the profession entails; I spent half of my childhood in clinics and hospitals. Let it go.

    That's generally how your arguments work.

    Shady; I know dude A who did philosophy at Oxford and is in trading therefore you NEVER need a quant background to do trading. base rate fallacy shady. You use outliers like a mofo.
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    (Original post by shady lane)
    My point is that a medicine degree isn't really related; it just looks good for the bank to have doctors on the desk. Same reason someone who studies Norse at Cambridge is more attractive to banks than someone who did Investment Banking Studies at City.

    Do you think banking is some sort of preening show?

    You hire Cambridge grads b/c they're ****ing smarter than City grads. It's not just about 'looking good.'
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    I know what a doctor does. Intimately. It has nothing to do with banking.

    A doctor COULD be a good banker, but not because they are a doctor; because that particular person has the ability to pick up what they need for banking. A medical education does not prepare you for banking.

    And frankly, the fact that doctors in the US prescribe meds from the company whose representative sends them the most pens and chocolate tells me that most of them would not be good at M&A in the field. They don't study the companies in detail. Don't be ridiculous.
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    (Original post by rboogie)
    Do you think banking is some sort of preening show?

    You hire Cambridge grads b/c they're ****ing smarter than City grads. It's not just about 'looking good.'
    You think "smart" and "attended a prestigious university" or "did a hard course" are the same thing. I don't. We agree to disagree. Plus, you have an obsession with Harvard that I find kind of amusing.
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    ugh, please stop. Just stop.
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    I'm leaving TSR soon; unlike you, I don't see the point of being here if I'm not a student. So you can annoy everyone else.
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    I like talking about banking and the finance world. It is what I do for a living. I guess you should tell chassez to leave as well. Don't be angry b/c you have no idea what you're talking about - I'm just correcting what is clear misinformation. Stop talking nonsense and I won't have to respond.
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    (Original post by shady lane)
    But it's a reputable degree, I'd imagine anyone with a medicine degree from Oxbridge or Imperial would stand as good of a chance as anyone else with a non-relevant degree.
    So would anyone with a medical degree from an institution which is not Oxbridge/Imperial not stand a good chance in the IB sector then?
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    Surely if you're studying medicine of all subjects you'll do something related to medicine...confused as to why you'd study a 5year course and not even enter a career in that field...
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    (Original post by Flexon)
    Surely if you're studying medicine of all subjects you'll do something related to medicine...confused as to why you'd study a 5year course and not even enter a career in that field...
    That's just it. Five years is an awful long time and a lot cna change int terms of career aspirations.
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    (Original post by Warrior King)
    That's just it. Five years is an awful long time and a lot cna change int terms of career aspirations.
    It doesn't feel that long once you're suddenly in your fifth year... :eek:

    If applicants aren't sure about medicine I'd recommend as much work experience/shadowing/volunteering as they can get their hands on (including in the other careers they think they might be interested in), perhaps even a gap year to try a few new things.

    If you're especially keen on the academic aspects & not so sure about the vocational then you might want to go for split pre-clinical/clinical courses = flexibility! A few of my peers left after year 3 to do financey/economics things.

    Or wherever you are if you realise it's not the career for you then consider intercalating to get an honours degree & stop after that.

    University of the qualification might be more relevant if you want to leave medicine. As medical schools they're all GMC regulated, you all enter a foundation job allocation system blind of where you graduated & they've even previously assumed the range of graduate ability is exactly the same from every medical school, ranking graduates within their specific school rather than overall but the real world of CVs/most other degrees it doesn't necessarily seem to work like that, especially in some fields.

    I don't understand why anyone would want to put themselves through a full medicine degree if they don't intend to practise or do something where it's going to be very relevant or required (e.g. a few planning on clinical research or public health but as a Dr grade).
    - It's 5/6 years + 1 if you actually want to be fully GMC registered to get a bachelors level qualification.
    - It's expensive: the extra time, token NHS financial support (which apparently screws some people over more than the SLC do) & lack of vacations throughout to earn money in.
    - It's hard work! It's not a typical student existence = 8am rounds, overnight shifts, being sent to DGHs or GPs miles away... & the whole responsibility thing when you're involved in the care of patients.

    But, that said - I think it's fabulous. :p:
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    (Original post by Elles)
    It doesn't feel that long once you're suddenly in your fifth year... :eek:

    If applicants aren't sure about medicine I'd recommend as much work experience/shadowing/volunteering as they can get their hands on (including in the other careers they think they might be interested in), perhaps even a gap year to try a few new things.

    If you're especially keen on the academic aspects & not so sure about the vocational then you might want to go for split pre-clinical/clinical courses = flexibility! A few of my peers left after year 3 to do financey/economics things.

    Or wherever you are if you realise it's not the career for you then consider intercalating to get an honours degree & stop after that.

    University of the qualification might be more relevant if you want to leave medicine. As medical schools they're all GMC regulated, you all enter a foundation job allocation system blind of where you graduated & they've even previously assumed the range of graduate ability is exactly the same from every medical school, ranking graduates within their specific school rather than overall but the real world of CVs/most other degrees it doesn't necessarily seem to work like that, especially in some fields.

    I don't understand why anyone would want to put themselves through a full medicine degree if they don't intend to practise or do something where it's going to be very relevant or required (e.g. a few planning on clinical research or public health but as a Dr grade).
    - It's 5/6 years + 1 if you actually want to be fully GMC registered to get a bachelors level qualification.
    - It's expensive: the extra time, token NHS financial support (which apparently screws some people over more than the SLC do) & lack of vacations throughout to earn money in.
    - It's hard work! It's not a typical student existence = 8am rounds, overnight shifts, being sent to DGHs or GPs miles away... & the whole responsibility thing when you're involved in the care of patients.

    But, that said - I think it's fabulous. :p:
    Well I've kind of been on a gap year already and at the time of applying and getting the offer I was very keen on Medicine. I don't know what happened since then but obviously many thoughts crossed through my mind.

    The coruse I'm enrolling on is a PBL course and the medical school I'm attending is one fo the newer medical schools. Like I said I'm not 100% certain, I want to keep my options open. I just hope the IB route isn't totally closed off to me.

    Thanks very much for the advice.
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    Think about it in a period of 5 years (assuming in just entering uni) I could come out with two master degrees...

    Degrees dont seem to matter as much as your personality, uni rep., and other stuff. You should be doing a degree you enjoy! So that you can do well.
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    (Original post by Flexon)
    Think about it in a period of 5 years (assuming in just entering uni) I could come out with two master degrees...

    Degrees dont seem to matter as much as your personality, uni rep., and other stuff. You should be doing a degree you enjoy! So that you can do well.
    Well at the time Medicine was THE degree for me (or so I thought).

    So does that mean I'm "screwed" then?
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    (Original post by Warrior King)
    Well at the time Medicine was THE degree for me (or so I thought).

    So does that mean I'm "screwed" then?
    Not sure what the stats are for medicine degrees in IB are...No harm in apply. Dont loose anything

    Do be prepared to explain why you don't want to do medicine cause they'll def. ask you that one.
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    (Original post by Warrior King)
    Well I've kind of been on a gap year already and at the time of applying and getting the offer I was very keen on Medicine. I don't know what happened since then but obviously many thoughts crossed through my mind.

    The coruse I'm enrolling on is a PBL course and the medical school I'm attending is one fo the newer medical schools. Like I said I'm not 100% certain, I want to keep my options open. I just hope the IB route isn't totally closed off to me.

    Thanks very much for the advice.
    I am in a similar situation, just completed my first year of medicine at UCL, and have entered a mentor programme with a IB. Im considering leaving after intercalating in a degree like philosophy, I just don't know what my chances are and whether its worth switching courses now
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    (Original post by maze.e)
    I am in a similar situation, just completed my first year of medicine at UCL, and have been head hunted by a IB. Im considering leaving after interculating in a degree like phyilosphy, I just dont know what my chances are and whether its worth switching courses now
    Already been hunted by an IB and only after year 1? That's really impressive. Have you been doing some work experience or applying for placements and internships?

    To be honest these past few months I was just focussing on getting through the first year as I was having problems settling in at medical school not helped by the fact I'm constantly thinking about what I want to do with my future.

    This summer I'm doing some work experience and stuff mainly geared towards medicine/pharmaceuticals but I am thinking of ways to boost my application for a crack at IB.

    Any advice?

    I'm not sure if my university is necessarily a "target uni" either even though it is consistently in the top 20 and on the fringes of the top 10 (Exeter). I thought the medical degree in itself would be viewed upon highly but I'm absolutely clueless.

    If anyone could give me any information, I'd greatly appreciate it.

    WK.
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    Im in similar kind of situation, I think im just going to leave after my bsc and apply for internship positions. What do you think IB would think about a medical sciences and managment degree from imperial. thanx.
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    Well if you're beeing hunted by Ibs, you surely can speak with them about it.
 
 
 
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