Turn on thread page Beta
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    So for medicine, we obviously have a module in medical Imaging:

    Anyone who has some knowledge of Medical Image may be able to help me with this..

    What does it mean by levels for example L1 or 2 levels or the level of T12?
    So for example, regarding the spleen - it runs in the splenorenal ligament into the retroperitoneum behind the pancreas. It then merges with the superior mesenteric vein to form the protein vein just behind the head of the pancreas at the L1/2 level.

    That's just one example but I've seen it other times in regards to medical imaging. Could anyone explain this to me? It's super confusing.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    So for medicine, we obviously have a module in medical Imaging:

    Anyone who has some knowledge of Medical Image may be able to help me with this..

    What does it mean by levels for example L1 or 2 levels or the level of T12?
    So for example, regarding the spleen - it runs in the splenorenal ligament into the retroperitoneum behind the pancreas. It then merges with the superior mesenteric vein to form the protein vein just behind the head of the pancreas at the L1/2 level.

    That's just one example but I've seen it other times in regards to medical imaging. Could anyone explain this to me? It's super confusing.
    Isn't it just spinal levels? I.e. the head of the pancreas is found at lumbar 1/2?

    Separately, and confusingly, MRIs can be T1/T2 weighted, I'd google for the specific differences of these though
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Yes, they are spinal (nerve root) levels:
    C = cervical;
    T = thoracic;
    L = lumbar;
    S = sacral.

    When stating the level in this way (e.g. C4 = 4th cervical vertebra; S1-S2 mean at the level of the intervertebral disc between 1st sacral and 2nd sacral vertrbrae)[all on the superior to inferior axis = how high or low].

    This use of levels is not restricted to imaging, but is also used to specify the height of organs, vessels, etc in descriptive anatomy as well as to describe the level of an incision in operative surgery. Also applicable to spinal nerve root lesions e.g. herpes zoster in the T5 spinal nerve distribution OR in neurology e.g. an L5-S1 (5th lumbar/1st sacral nerve root) lesion may cause paralysis of the bladder and incontinence.

    Good point brought up by ax12 about T1 OR T2 weighted images (not to be confused with 1st thoracic or 2nd thoracic levels, respectively) - the weighting of images refers to the digital analysis that results in either fatty or aqueous tissues showing up as more distinct. I am not sure why, but T1 weighted MRI is better to view anatomy, and T2 weighted MRI for pathology.

    M (clinical pharmacologist)
 
 
 
The home of Results and Clearing

3,197

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. SAE Institute
    Animation, Audio, Film, Games, Music, Business, Web Further education
    Thu, 16 Aug '18
  2. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
  3. University of Bolton
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
Poll
Will you be tempted to trade up and get out of your firm offer on results day?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.