Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone,

    I'm Mahima and I'm currently studying three a-level subjects: maths (edexcel), history (ocr) and english literature (aqa).

    For AS Level I got an ABB for these subjects with the A in English Lit. And for UCAS predictions I managed to weasel my way into getting A*AA predictions (so I have a lot to attain!).

    I'd learnt a lot from the troubles of surviving Year 12 and feel like I have the tools needed in order to aim for the highest marks in Year 13 (I want three A*s, but I'll settle for two A*s and an A). I'm prepared to work damn hard to get to where I need to be.

    We can do it!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Same boat got AABB and got an A*A*A prediction.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SamLuxa)
    Same boat got AABB and got an A*A*A prediction.
    That's brilliant! What subjects?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    One of the main tips I learnt from Year 12 was the importance of having a study timetable from the very beginning. A study timetable keeps you focused and means that instead of worrying about what to revise (and if you're revising enough) you can dedicate more time to actually getting more revision done. The recommended study hours for a successful Year 13 kid is 25+ hours, and I had thought about that when doing my timetable.

    How to construct a study timetable
    • Block out time for bare necessities

    Sleep is very important when it comes to consolidating long-term information.
    • Block out time for commitments

    Do you have a part-time job? need to visit relatives every week? God forbid - do you go to the gym?!
    • Insert your school timetable into this study timetable

    This helps when it comes to organising holiday revision - you already have a timetable ready for those school hours you're missing out on.

    And that's your timetable sorted. Please let me know if you have any trouble or any questions - I am all for helping you. A great tool for constructing a study timetable by the way (I used it in Year 12) is getrevising.co.uk.

    Remember the pomodoro technique! Once you're done with your timetable it will look incredibly packed - turns out 25+ hours is a lot. However you can't expect yourself to study for a whole hour each time and I'd recommend experimenting with the pomodoro technique of typically 25 minutes of work with a 5 minute break (25/5) with longer periods of focus for productivity masters: 50/10, 45/15 - or if you really need to practice your focusing skills two 20/10s per hour.

    The Hierarchy of Pomodoro Times (according to me)
    Beginner (20/10s)
    Intermediate (25/5s)
    Advanced (45/15s)
    Super advanced (50/10s)

    That is: 20 minutes of work with a 10 minute break. One super awesome (and flexible and really aesthetically pleasing) pomodoro app. Much like the Momentum chrome extension it has a cool picture as the background, it plays "white noise" sounds such as rain, cafe noise, and forest, and even has a inspirational quote at the bottom. Currently I don't think there's an android version.
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by moosha23)
    One of the main tips I learnt from Year 12 was the importance of having a study timetable from the very beginning. A study timetable keeps you focused and means that instead of worrying about what to revise (and if you're revising enough) you can dedicate more time to actually getting more revision done. The recommended study hours for a successful Year 13 kid is 25+ hours, and I had thought about that when doing my timetable.

    How to construct a study timetable
    • Block out time for bare necessities

    Sleep is very important when it comes to consolidating long-term information.
    • Block out time for commitments

    Do you have a part-time job? need to visit relatives every week? God forbid - do you go to the gym?!
    • Insert your school timetable into this study timetable

    This helps when it comes to organising holiday revision - you already have a timetable ready for those school hours you're missing out on.

    And that's your timetable sorted. Please let me know if you have any trouble or any questions - I am all for helping you. A great tool for constructing a study timetable by the way (I used it in Year 12) is getrevising.co.uk.

    Remember the pomodoro technique! Once you're done with your timetable it will look incredibly packed - turns out 25+ hours is a lot. However you can't expect yourself to study for a whole hour each time and I'd recommend experimenting with the pomodoro technique of typically 25 minutes of work with a 5 minute break (25/5) with longer periods of focus for productivity masters: 50/10, 45/15 - or if you really need to practice your focusing skills two 20/10s per hour.

    The Hierarchy of Pomodoro Times (according to me)
    Beginner (20/10s)
    Intermediate (25/5s)
    Advanced (45/15s)
    Super advanced (50/10s)

    That is: 20 minutes of work with a 10 minute break. One super awesome (and flexible and really aesthetically pleasing) pomodoro app. Much like the Momentum chrome extension it has a cool picture as the background, it plays "white noise" sounds such as rain, cafe noise, and forest, and even has a inspirational quote at the bottom. Currently I don't think there's an android version.
    What are you hoping to do at university? What gcse grades did you get in those subjects?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MajorFader)
    What are you hoping to do at university? What gcse grades did you get in those subjects?
    I'm hoping to study English Literature at university - at GCSE I got an A* in English Lit. What are you planning to do?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by moosha23)
    Hi everyone,

    I'm Mahima and I'm currently studying three a-level subjects: maths (edexcel), history (ocr) and english literature (aqa).

    For AS Level I got an ABB for these subjects with the A in English Lit. And for UCAS predictions I managed to weasel my way into getting A*AA predictions (so I have a lot to attain!).

    I'd learnt a lot from the troubles of surviving Year 12 and feel like I have the tools needed in order to aim for the highest marks in Year 13 (I want three A*s, but I'll settle for two A*s and an A). I'm prepared to work damn hard to get to where I need to be.

    We can do it!
    So did you finish year 13. What were your grades ?
 
 
 
The home of Results and Clearing

2,556

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. SAE Institute
    Animation, Audio, Film, Games, Music, Business, Web Further education
    Thu, 16 Aug '18
  2. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
  3. University of Bolton
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
Poll
Do you want your parents to be with you when you collect your A-level results?
Useful resources

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.