RayGhoul
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I recently just handed it in my ucas for biomedical sciences and am hoping to get into Kcl or Ucl. I'm just wondering whether there is any demand in this field and will I be able to get a job once I leave uni. I researched pay as well although that's not the main reason to study sciences, it seems that the pay is OK but I thought that would be an average from people in press prestigious unis.
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RegisteredBMS
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It depends what you want to do after you finish the degree. If you give us that information I can give you a justified answer.
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RayGhoul
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I want to go into research. I would like to know the differences in employability and salary between the NHS and the private sector and how difficult it is to get a permanent job.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by RayGhoul)
I want to go into research. I would like to know the differences in employability and salary between the NHS and the private sector and how difficult it is to get a permanent job.
There is no private sector as a Biomedical Scientist. A Biomedical Scientist works in the NHS. If anyone tells you they're a Biomedical Scientist working in the private sector they're lying, it's a protected title and as such only those with HCPC registration can use it, which you only require to work in the NHS. All samples sent to diagnostic labs from private hospitals go to NHS laboratories.

You can go into other private sector jobs that involve research, drug development, heck you can go into most things with a Biomedical Science degree aslong as you have the right CV. It's a very generic degree nowadays, it's not even aimed at getting you to be a NHS Biomedical Scientist anymore, so if you want to go down a certain path you'll have to do something to get some bonus points on your CV outside of your studies. An example is if you want to work in pharmaceuticals, take a year in industry and go work for one for a year.
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RayGhoul
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I see thank you very much for such a detailed answer answer. In the case of finding permanent work in a lab and salary, what are the chances with this degree. Given that I achieve a high degree at a prestigious university .
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by RayGhoul)
I see thank you very much for such a detailed answer answer. In the case of finding permanent work in a lab and salary, what are the chances with this degree. Given that I achieve a high degree at a prestigious university .
It makes very little difference. Go to Oxford and get a First or go to Manchester Met and get a 2:2, doesn't make a difference. You need HCPC registration to work as a Biomedical Scientist which, when you graduate you will not have. That means that in NHS diagnostic laboratories you are only qualified at Band 2 or below. That's a salary of £15k.

Want your registration? Well you've made the first wrong decision in your course. The best route is via a 'non-prestigious' University doing BSc Healthcare Science since it is the only course supported by the Department of Health and NHS to incorporate HCPC registration for a Biomedical Scientist. There's a reason why practically none of the Biomedical Scientist's within the NHS went to prestigious Universities and that's because non-prestigious Universities offered more practical courses than made them more employable.

IF, and this is a big if because most Universities have given up with this no that BSc Healthcare Science has come in, if you can get a year in industry in a pathology laboratory where they will put you through your registration portfolio then you will graduate after 4 years with registration (compared to graduating after 3 with registration on HCS). Most labs have an agreement with a University to take students but this has been mostly taken up by HCS students now.

In the likelihood that this is not an option. Your best route, and the route that a lot of people take who fall into the "Biomedical science course for a biomedical science career" trap, is to accept a Band 2 post in a pathology laboratory. Some will support you in then progressing with your portfolio for registration. Some won't, some will make you compete with other staff members for a trainee post to do your registration.

If, like some come back with, a Band 2 post is below you then I'm afraid you best start looking into other areas to use your degree. I know several people who had to spend time working as a Band 2 even after they had become a registered BMS. The NHS is one of those places where you have to get one foot in the door to stand much of a chance and it's why Band 2 posts are very competitive because many, many staff members from other NHS departments often apply for them.
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RayGhoul
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I see. That's a shame to hear. Since king's and Ucl offer a 4 year integrated masters into pharmacology and neuroscience masters will that account for the HCPC registration. If not what other areas can I go into

I've been researching a bit and I've read that you can do a 3 year Bsc then start an NHS Healthcare training programme to become a clinical scientist. Would that be a good choice? It clearly is competitive and I believe that your degree and uni you graduate from may give you and advantage to apply for this.
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RegisteredBMS
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An integrated masters in pharmacology and neuroscience gives you no more benefit in order to become a HCPC registered Biomedical Scientist than any other irrelevant degree you could do. You have do do an IBMS accredited degree followed by, or inclusive of, a placement (or working in as Band 2) during which you achieve HCPC registration.

If you want to do the STP to become a Clinical Scientist then that's completely different. The Biomedical Scientist and Clinical Scientist career paths are not linked. I have spoke to people who are on the panel for the STP and been told that despite people with PhD's and Master's applying, once a person meets the basic entry requirements their results are then ignored so no, your good University and good degree will not help much.
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RayGhoul
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I see, I heard you can do top-up modules to make your degree IBMS accredited, how much would that cost and how long would that take? I always have an option to go to QMUL or St George's if I want to have an accredited degree but id much prefer KCL and UCL (although I haven't got any offers yet so I cant speak down on any unis).
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Doing IBMS top-up module's is worst case scenario. It is expensive and time consuming.

You're in the stereotypical pre-undergraduate mind frame of "I want to go to this University because it's ranked X" rather than "I want to go to this University because I will be in the best position to be employed in my chosen career."

As I said previously, there's a reason that all the senior biomedical scientists in the NHS went to the likes of University of Hull and Sheffield Hallam, they've been known to run practical courses and allowed their students to gain HCPC registration.
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RayGhoul
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I see. So prestigious unis don't mean much then. Since QMUL and St George's have their degree accredited by IBMS, I would still need to get work in a pathology lab and hope that they support me with my HCPC registration. Coming back to the point of becoming a clinical scientist, will my degree before the training have to be HCPC accredited or will I achieve this during training?
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RegisteredBMS
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No, if you want to be a Clinical Scientist then the STP will deal with your registration. You do not have to do a Biomedical Science or similar course to then apply for the STP either. The STP is quite competitive but it's very different to the career of a Biomedical Scientist. It is more interpretive than diagnostic. Less laboratory work.
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