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    Hi, I just have a quick question!

    In my personal statement I wrote about parliamentary sovereignty however it's making me paranoid as I think I wrote about it in the wrong sense!

    My understanding of parliamentary sovereignty is that the prime minister cannot pass a new law with having parliament vote over it first. Is this right?

    In my personal statement I just briefly wrote about how Theresa May went against parliamentary sovereignty by not advising parliament about her decision on Article 50.

    Thanks xx
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    (Original post by Samihab)
    Hi, I just have a quick question!

    In my personal statement I wrote about parliamentary sovereignty however it's making me paranoid as I think I wrote about it in the wrong sense!

    My understanding of parliamentary sovereignty is that the prime minister cannot pass a new law with having parliament vote over it first. Is this right?

    In my personal statement I just briefly wrote about how Theresa May went against parliamentary sovereignty by not advising parliament about her decision on Article 50.

    Thanks xx
    Parliamentary sovereignty has both a legal and a more philosophical meaning.

    Legally, it means that Courts cannot overturn Acts of Parliament and that Parliament cannot be bound by previous legislation (notable anomalies are the HRA and ECA, which can only be repealed in absolutely clear words).

    Now, the Prime Minister and anyone below him/her can only make secondary laws. Primary laws must come from Parliament. Theresa May not letting Parliament vote was more of a prerogative issue than one of sovereignty (in legal terms at least).

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    (Original post by _Fergo)
    Parliamentary sovereignty has both a legal and a more philosophical meaning.

    Legally, it means that Courts cannot overturn Acts of Parliament and that Parliament cannot be bound by previous legislation (notable anomalies are the HRA and ECA, which can only be repealed in absolutely clear words).

    Now, the Prime Minister and anyone below him/her can only make secondary laws. Primary laws must come from Parliament. Theresa May not letting Parliament vote was more of a prerogative issue than one of sovereignty (in legal terms at least).

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    This. Theresa May didn't go against any Parliamentary Sovereignty - moreso when the legal case is still to be ruled in our highest courts of appeal (and she hasn't actually done anything with the referendum vote).

    Odd thing to write about in a personal statement when you're unsure of the context and definition of the concept.. That said, good luck OP.
 
 
 
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