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    I am curious as to exactly what is being taught in the first and second, and possibly the 3rd year of the course, as it would help me prepare. (i realise that different ppl take different options in the final year, so if you could write whatever options you've chosen)

    For instance, what area of maths is required/taught?
    Are the evaluative writing simialr to to the A level stuff and how much analylitical/evaluative writing do students have to write per week?
    Is a maths/statistics skills more or less important than english/analytical writing skills?

    Lastly, how is the exam at the end of the year structured, i.e what is the format?

    Please include other relevant information as well to make it as comphrensive as possible.

    Thanks in advance!!1
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    hi id like to know also i may change course after first year to econ
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    I Haven't done the course but http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calen...cEconomics.htm might be a good starting point if you haven't seen it yet.
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    Yeah, is it possible to switch degrees after a year/term ?
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    @ tourist, of course i have read the guide overview and the relevent pages, but its the personal experience from ppl who have actually done the course that is more valuable.

    I mean, for 1 thing, the brochure only outlines the +ve aspects of the course, which is obvously important, but at the same time, i'd like to know about the 'otherside of the story' just to be prepared and of course the questions i'd like to know are not all outlined in the overview so i'm hoping some undergrads can ansewer here.
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    For EC102 there's a multiple choice quiz per week, for MA100 and ST102 there are weekly exercise sets. Mathematical ability is a must, although not for EC102, and as far as I'm aware, you won't write an essay until the third year - certainly not in the first year. The EC102 exam has two halves (micro and macro), each of which has eight true/false questions and then a choice of three longer questions. In my experience, the workload is no real problem whatsoever...

    And for people wishing to know, the first year of BSc Economics is the same as the first year for half the degrees at LSE, pretty much.
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    (Original post by zxczxc)
    For EC102 there's a multiple choice quiz per week, for MA100 and ST102 there are weekly exercise sets. Mathematical ability is a must, although not for EC102, and as far as I'm aware, you won't write an essay until the third year - certainly not in the first year. The EC102 exam has two halves (micro and macro), each of which has eight true/false questions and then a choice of three longer questions. In my experience, the workload is no real problem whatsoever...

    And for people wishing to know, the first year of BSc Economics is the same as the first year for half the degrees at LSE, pretty much.
    Hi thanks for the insight!
    Do you know many people that were able to change courses from another to Economics? and if so what do they consider when deciding? im sure that a lot of people will push their luck right? (myself included)
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    Hi thanks for the insight!
    Do you know many people that were able to change courses from another to Economics? and if so what do they consider when deciding? im sure that a lot of people will push their luck right? (myself included)
    what subject are you taking? if it;s something similar e.g. maths+econ then youd should haave a high chance, but if you're doing a course that is totally unrealted e.g. antropology, then u mite have soe difficult.

    Don't take my words for it though as i am just assuming?
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    It's competitive, first year scores matter and you will have to work your arse off.

    Enjoy!
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    I met my offer for AccFin, although having spoken to HR directly at a BB, they say it doesnt matter which degree, jsut the Uni you go to. but still if im at LSE, i would feel so good if i did Econ as well!
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    A&F and Econ are probably indifferent courses to a BB, so I wouldn't worry about it too much. Sure Econ has a little more prestige to average student, but if you're worried about BB's, all that matters is that you're doing a good course at a good uni - that will always get you in the door.
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    (Original post by Bleached)
    Hi thanks for the insight!
    Do you know many people that were able to change courses from another to Economics? and if so what do they consider when deciding? im sure that a lot of people will push their luck right? (myself included)
    Personally, I don't know of anyone doing that. To switch from one course to another is certainly possible (I know a guy who went from Geography to IR, and even one from Anthoropology and Law to straight Law), but they are the exceptions. As far as I'm aware, there's pretty much no chance of going onto straight economics, especially if you aren't already doing something with the subject and doing MA100/ST102.
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    i think they are 75% the same, Econ has an outside option whereas AccFin has elements of Accounting and Finance? Isnt someone on TSR who did just that? his name is Johan Raymond?
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    (Original post by Bleached)
    i think they are 75% the same, Econ has an outside option whereas AccFin has elements of Accounting and Finance? Isnt someone on TSR who did just that? his name is Johan Raymond?
    Quite possibly. Well, in the first year all of the A&F and Economics compulsory courses are the same (as long as you do proper maths and stats), then in the second year A&F goes more down the accounting/finance route with a couple of economics modules, then in the third year they're completely different.
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    (Original post by zxczxc)
    Quite possibly. Well, in the first year all of the A&F and Economics compulsory courses are the same (as long as you do proper maths and stats), then in the second year A&F goes more down the accounting/finance route with a couple of economics modules, then in the third year they're completely different.
    Yeah sorry i meant the first year :p: , are you at LSE atm? mind if i ask a few question via pm?
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    (Original post by Bleached)
    Yeah sorry i meant the first year :p: , are you at LSE atm? mind if i ask a few question via pm?
    I've just finished my first year for Philosophy & Economics, so fire away.
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    (Original post by vasehedar)
    I am curious as to exactly what is being taught in the first and second, and possibly the 3rd year of the course, as it would help me prepare. (i realise that different ppl take different options in the final year, so if you could write whatever options you've chosen)

    For instance, what area of maths is required/taught?
    Are the evaluative writing simialr to to the A level stuff and how much analylitical/evaluative writing do students have to write per week?
    Is a maths/statistics skills more or less important than english/analytical writing skills?

    Lastly, how is the exam at the end of the year structured, i.e what is the format?

    Please include other relevant information as well to make it as comphrensive as possible.

    Thanks in advance!!1

    in the first year you are taught maths (linear algebra and multivariate calculus) and statistics (s1-s6 apparently) modules. some people say the workload is easy at lse, but without much maths experience (or super intelligence) i found those two modules very daunting. you do basically start running from the first lecture (in maths anyway - stats was a joke for a couple of weeks).

    i'd say it is a good idea to look here http://www.maths.lse.ac.uk/Courses/MA100/ and do the refreshers before starting the year (i didn't, though i forgot most of the a-level maths by october, which meant i struggled for a bit!). the maths and stats really aren't that hard but the pace is very fast (which is the main difference between lse maths and a-level maths.. i remember sitting about doing one question a week for a-level and then doing a couple of exam papers come exam time and you are pretty much on an A grade), but if u work hard u will find that come exam time u will be able to do the exam questions relatively easy. let's just say i am insanely better at maths and stats than i was a year ago.

    on the other hand, as has already been said, you don't have any essays in the first year, unless u choose an essay module as your option (e.g. econ history). i wrote one essay for the whole year, which was a christmas piece of work for my accounting module.

    the actual work to do doesn't really take that long, but i struggled with many pieces of homework to get them all right (in maths and stats anyway). the econ module on the other hand has a pretty easy mini quiz each week, and four major pieces over the whole year (of 10 exam style questions each, to be handed in). though the work you do for econ is nothing at all like a-level (micro is extended hugely, and macro is just completely different, you won't be getting any essays on "what will the effects of higher interest rates be on the economy?").

    really the workload isn't that heavy, for maths, for instance, you get each week 5-10 longish questions, that are usually quite hard and really u could just botch them, do it in 30 mins, wait for your class to explain the answers, and sit back and chill out in the common room in the meantime. i can't work like that though, i liked to keep a consistent level of work up.

    for l101 you will have four exams at the end of the year, each one is 3 hours long and if you work hard they will not be that difficult (ie. you can still go out during the year and do whatever (the second term is a drunken blur to me..) and still get a first if you keep the work up). there is plenty of revision time... the course basically finishes mid march, with exams beginning in mid may.

    hope this is of use to you..
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    alisama
    Thank you so much. just wondering do can you compare the relative difficulty of Econ and AccFin? and do you know if change of course is possible?

    when you say maths and stats do you mean the full modules?
    because the difference between the two is that AccFin HAVE to do teh accounting module, whereas the Econ can choose an outside option. I have not done a-level econ, will this affect me? I want to do Econ @ LSE now because it will look better for IB right?
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    (Original post by Bleached)
    Thank you so much. just wondering do can you compare the relative difficulty of Econ and AccFin? and do you know if change of course is possible?

    when you say maths and stats do you mean the full modules?
    because the difference between the two is that AccFin HAVE to do teh accounting module, whereas the Econ can choose an outside option. I have not done a-level econ, will this affect me? I want to do Econ @ LSE now because it will look better for IB right?
    They're different degrees; Economics is far more mathsy.

    Please don't want to change subject because investment banks might prefer Economics. It's the poorest reason around, and applying with the intention of changing course will be the worst thing you can do: you'll be stuck in a degree course you don't like, wasting three years of your life.

    And no, Economics at A-Level isn't all that important.
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    (Original post by zxczxc)
    They're different degrees; Economics is far more mathsy.

    Please don't want to change subject because investment banks might prefer Economics. It's the poorest reason around, and applying with the intention of changing course will be the worst thing you can do: you'll be stuck in a degree course you don't like, wasting three years of your life.

    And no, Economics at A-Level isn't all that important.

    FYI i was talking about the first year. well its kind of a gamble to begin with, i haven't done Econ or Acc before, i looked at the course and saw it was a combination or maths, stats, econ etc and though it looked pretty good.
    What are you doing atm? i'll msn ya actually hehe
 
 
 
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