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    I find almost all books written by scholars have so many references?
    So when I try to take what they said sometimes do I reference it with there authors name or the references they have made below on the next page stating where it came from?! I'm confused because sometimes they would state the referencers name as [paul] blah blah and sometimes they won't, confused on who to reference at that point
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    If you're quoting or referring to the author's work then you obviously reference the author. If you get an idea from or you want to quote one of the author's references then you need to go back to the original source and reference that.
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    It's OK (although not ideal) to cite one author from another's work if you cant get back to the original source, as long as you reference it correctly so that it's clear that is what you are doing.

    Example:
    "Smith (2004) states that Jones (Jones 1998 in Smith 2004) has resolved the issue."

    If you didn't have access to the original Jones 1998 text, you would cite in-text as above and put a full reference to only Smith 2004 in the Bibliography.

    However you should try to avoid doing this if you can. It isn't great technique, but sometimes library access limitations and coursework deadlines don't allow time for inter-library loans and it's necessary. Keep it to a minimum though and if in doubt, ask the person who set the assignment for guidance. There could be guidelines for this at your uni, or the person setting the work (and therefore marking it) may have a personal preference one way or the other.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    It's OK (although not ideal) to cite one author from another's work if you cant get back to the original source, as long as you reference it correctly so that it's clear that is what you are doing.

    Example:
    "Smith (2004) states that Jones (Jones 1998 in Smith 2004) has resolved the issue."

    If you didn't have access to the original Jones 1998 text, you would cite in-text as above and put a full reference to only Smith 2004 in the Bibliography.

    However you should try to avoid doing this if you can. It isn't great technique, but sometimes library access limitations and coursework deadlines don't allow time for inter-library loans and it's necessary. Keep it to a minimum though and if in doubt, ask the person who set the assignment for guidance. There could be guidelines for this at your uni, or the person setting the work (and therefore marking it) may have a personal preference one way or the other.
    Ah right thank you, just most books nowadays do this a lot so you have to just find the other authors and they aren't always available.
    I'd do the bilbliography in the same way right with (Smith 2004) added in rather than Jones?
 
 
 
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