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    Hi, I am planning to sit the LNAT at the end of this month and was wondering how to structure the essays. For instance if the question was "Women have the chance to achieve anything they want"How do you respond to this statement? would you do like an intro 3 paragraphs agreeing with the statement and one against or all for the one side? thank you!
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    Here are two versions of what you should not do, but which seem to have been taught as correct models for an analytical essay:

    - introduction
    - statement is correct because [argument A]
    - statement is correct because [argument B]
    - 'But some people disagree!':
    - statement is incorrent because [argument C]
    - statement is incorrect because [argument D]
    - 'conclusion': 'Overall, I agree with argument D.'

    - introduction
    - statement is correct because [argument A]
    - on the other hand maybe statement is incorrect because [argument B]
    - still, statement may be correct after all because [argument C]
    - but some disagree with this too because [argument D]
    - 'conclusion': 'Overall, I agree with argument D.'

    What is wrong with these is that you are just listing a bunch of possible arguments for and against, with no critical analysis, before deciding apparently arbitrarily that one of them is best. Being fair to both sides does not mean presenting all arguments as if they were equally compelling. Some arguments are good and some are bad and you're supposed to distinguish the good from the bad. Being fair to both sides does mean showing that you understand the grounds on which your own view might reasonably be criticized.

    What you should do is to make an argument for your view right from the beginning of the essay. So (and this is not a template because there are several good ways to write an essay)

    - Introduction should briefly unpack what the question is getting at and state the position that you will argue for
    - Body of essay should pursue your line of argument (which can include more than one 'point in favour' of your view, but doesn't have to, as long as your argument is careful and interesting), and address possible objections either immediately as they arise, or after you have concluded the preliminary case for your view
    - Conclusion should follow from your argument - that is, the reader needs to read your conclusion and immediately see how what you have just said in the last few paragraphs leads to what you are concluding. If you find yourself starting your final paragraph with 'Overall...', ask yourself whether what you are about to write actually flows from the preceding argument, or whether you're just doing some opaque, impressionistic weighing exercise. Nine times out of ten it's the latter.
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    (Original post by Estreth)
    Here are two versions of what you should not do, but which seem to have been taught as correct models for an analytical essay:

    - introduction
    - statement is correct because [argument A]
    - statement is correct because [argument B]
    - 'But some people disagree!':
    - statement is incorrent because [argument C]
    - statement is incorrect because [argument D]
    - 'conclusion': 'Overall, I agree with argument D.'

    - introduction
    - statement is correct because [argument A]
    - on the other hand maybe statement is incorrect because [argument B]
    - still, statement may be correct after all because [argument C]
    - but some disagree with this too because [argument D]
    - 'conclusion': 'Overall, I agree with argument D.'

    What is wrong with these is that you are just listing a bunch of possible arguments for and against, with no critical analysis, before deciding apparently arbitrarily that one of them is best. Being fair to both sides does not mean presenting all arguments as if they were equally compelling. Some arguments are good and some are bad and you're supposed to distinguish the good from the bad. Being fair to both sides does mean showing that you understand the grounds on which your own view might reasonably be criticized.

    What you should do is to make an argument for your viewright from the beginning of the essay. So (and this is not a template because there are several good ways to write an essay)

    - Introduction should briefly unpack what the question is getting at and state the position that you will argue for
    - Body of essay should pursue your line of argument (which can include more than one 'point in favour' of your view, but doesn't have to, as long as your argument is careful and interesting), and address possible objections either immediately as they arise, or after you have concluded the preliminary case for your view
    - Conclusion should follow from your argument - that is, the reader needs to read your conclusion and immediately see how what you have just said in the last few paragraphs leads to what you are concluding. If you find yourself starting your final paragraph with 'Overall...', ask yourself whether what you are about to write actually flows from the preceding argument, or whether you're just doing some opaque, impressionistic weighing exercise. Nine times out of ten it's the latter.
    Thank you so so much!!!!! This has been so much help
 
 
 
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