KaranKKC
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I'm in year 13 and I've considered doing Biomedical science since year 12, my university choices are; Wolverhampton, Aston, Manchester Met, Staffordshire, and Coventry. I'm aiming to hopefully get a B in biology.
currently I'm really not sure if i should do biomedical science at university because I've been researching and career prospects seem to be rough. i want to become a biomedical scientist but with limited placement opportunities i don't know whether i will be able to qualify as one. I'm not sure if this degree would be worth it or just a waste of money.
if anyone is studying at these universities and studying biomedical could you please help me out.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by KaranKKC)
I'm in year 13 and I've considered doing Biomedical science since year 12, my university choices are; Wolverhampton, Aston, Manchester Met, Staffordshire, and Coventry. I'm aiming to hopefully get a B in biology.
currently I'm really not sure if i should do biomedical science at university because I've been researching and career prospects seem to be rough. i want to become a biomedical scientist but with limited placement opportunities i don't know whether i will be able to qualify as one. I'm not sure if this degree would be worth it or just a waste of money.
if anyone is studying at these universities and studying biomedical could you please help me out.
Have you already applied?

Scrap them. If you truly want to be a Biomedical Scientist go for the NHS PTP, BSc Healthcare Science. It's run at a limited but ever increasing Universities and these tend to be your less prestigious ones but that is simply because of the nature of the course.

The course included an integrated laboratory placement which will earn you your HCPC registration to act as a Biomedical Scientist. It's a guaranteed placement in a world where, outside HCS, you are right in saying there are very limited placement opportunities.
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KaranKKC
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
Have you already applied?

Scrap them. If you truly want to be a Biomedical Scientist go for the NHS PTP, BSc Healthcare Science. It's run at a limited but ever increasing Universities and these tend to be your less prestigious ones but that is simply because of the nature of the course.

The course included an integrated laboratory placement which will earn you your HCPC registration to act as a Biomedical Scientist. It's a guaranteed placement in a world where, outside HCS, you are right in saying there are very limited placement opportunities.
I've never heard of this before. it includes courses like cardiac physiology, so would i still be able to become a biomedical scientist with that degree course? also say if i do apply for biomedical science and i take the route for the HCPC registration and I'm not successful can i still go onto different jobs such as forensics, HM armed forces? also would i not need a course accredited by the IBMS to become a biomedical scientist.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by KaranKKC)
I've never heard of this before. it includes courses like cardiac physiology, so would i still be able to become a biomedical scientist with that degree course? also say if i do apply for biomedical science and i take the route for the HCPC registration and I'm not successful can i still go onto different jobs such as forensics, HM armed forces?
There are various specialisms and as such the one you'd be looking for is BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science). This will allow you to become a HCPC registered Biomedical Scientist. It also allows final year specialisation into infection science, blood science, cellular science or genetics. The choice of specialism affects the laboratory you will be placed in during your 2nd and 3rd year placements.

The niche aspect of the course is one thing that often concerns people and some do thing they're committing to the BMS career by going for the course and therefore steer away from it but it's not true. BSc HCS is actually very similar to BSc BMS in the first 2 years and you're able to go on to do anything that you can do on BSc BMS with the added option of being a HCPC registered BMS.

If you like the idea of armed forced, why not look into doing a degree and training with them? I know one of the BMS' at my laboratory did his with the RAF, they fund your degree and put you through your training.
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KaranKKC
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
There are various specialisms and as such the one you'd be looking for is BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science). This will allow you to become a HCPC registered Biomedical Scientist. It also allows final year specialisation into infection science, blood science, cellular science or genetics. The choice of specialism affects the laboratory you will be placed in during your 2nd and 3rd year placements.

The niche aspect of the course is one thing that often concerns people and some do thing they're committing to the BMS career by going for the course and therefore steer away from it but it's not true. BSc HCS is actually very similar to BSc BMS in the first 2 years and you're able to go on to do anything that you can do on BSc BMS with the added option of being a HCPC registered BMS.

If you like the idea of armed forced, why not look into doing a degree and training with them? I know one of the BMS' at my laboratory did his with the RAF, they fund your degree and put you through your training.
I'll have to have a look into that, but if i did choose to do biomedical science at university, how likely would i be able to become an accredited biomedical scientist. because i have a month till my personal statement is due and i honestly thought i was going on the right track. Also if i carry out a degree in biomedical science would there be more job opportunities even if i don't take the biomedical scientist route.
Also which universities would you recommend for HCS, because different universities have things such as blood sciences so could i do a degree in blood science in Manchester and still be able to become a registered BMS?
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by KaranKKC)
I'll have to have a look into that, but if i did choose to do biomedical science at university, how likely would i be able to become an accredited biomedical scientist. because i have a month till my personal statement is due and i honestly thought i was going on the right track. Also if i carry out a degree in biomedical science would there be more job opportunities even if i don't take the biomedical scientist route.
Just to clear something up as it's confusing otherwise, it's a degree in Healthcare Science (Life Science) that gets you to become a Biomedical Scientist, not a degree in Biomedical Science (yeah, weird I know.)

The opportunities when comparing a normal Biomedical Science course and the Healthcare Science course are exactly the same except for the fact that a graduate of Healthcare Science would be qualified to enter immediately as a Band 5 Biomedical Scientist.

Your personal statement should not need changing really if it was aimed towards being a Biomedical Scientist. The courses aren't that dissimilar since they will both be IBMS accredited and the IBMS require certain modules in order for them to stamp a course as accredited.
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KaranKKC
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
Just to clear something up as it's confusing otherwise, it's a degree in Healthcare Science (Life Science) that gets you to become a Biomedical Scientist, not a degree in Biomedical Science (yeah, weird I know.)

The opportunities when comparing a normal Biomedical Science course and the Healthcare Science course are exactly the same except for the fact that a graduate of Healthcare Science would be qualified to enter immediately as a Band 5 Biomedical Scientist.

Your personal statement should not need changing really if it was aimed towards being a Biomedical Scientist. The courses aren't that dissimilar since they will both be IBMS accredited and the IBMS require certain modules in order for them to stamp a course as accredited.
which universities would you recommend for the HCS course that is accredited by the IBMS
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KaranKKC
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(Original post by KaranKKC)
which universities would you recommend for the HCS course that is accredited by the IBMS
also would you say it would be worth applying to three universities for the Biomedical science course and two for Healthcare Science, and would it be possible to be able to transfer from biomedical to healthcare?
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I think it would be sensible to apply to some BMS courses because as I say there are limited HCS options in terms of University.

My knowledge doesn't stem to other Universities, but I know at the University of Bradford that they actively recruit a few students from the BMS course in around November of the first semester. A few will then transfer across. My year had 10 people on the HCS course since it's limited by how many placements are available. The University of Bradford is a massively undervalued University and there's a reason when you go over to Leeds Teaching Hospital's that a lot of their diagnostic laboratory staff attended the University of Bradford. You do have to ask yourself if there's anything else you want out of University though such as nightlife. Bradford is not great for that and it's not a great city but Leeds is next door.

Your options for HCS are

University of Bradford
Cardiff Metropolitan University
University of Hertfordshire
University of Hull
Manchester Metropolitan University
Plymouth University
University of Portsmouth (Noted as not currently recruiting on the NHS website)
University of Sunderland
University of Central Lancashire
University of the West of England


When I applied it was only University of Bradford and Bristol University that ran the course with Bradford being the first to run it. I guess we had the bonus of having the Uni most experienced with the course but the option of that fairly large list would have been nice.
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Charles97
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Very little job opportunity and a course commonly used as a GEM application.
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KaranKKC
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
I think it would be sensible to apply to some BMS courses because as I say there are limited HCS options in terms of University.

My knowledge doesn't stem to other Universities, but I know at the University of Bradford that they actively recruit a few students from the BMS course in around November of the first semester. A few will then transfer across. My year had 10 people on the HCS course since it's limited by how many placements are available. The University of Bradford is a massively undervalued University and there's a reason when you go over to Leeds Teaching Hospital's that a lot of their diagnostic laboratory staff attended the University of Bradford. You do have to ask yourself if there's anything else you want out of University though such as nightlife. Bradford is not great for that and it's not a great city but Leeds is next door.

Your options for HCS are

University of Bradford
Cardiff Metropolitan University
University of Hertfordshire
University of Hull
Manchester Metropolitan University
Plymouth University
University of Portsmouth (Noted as not currently recruiting on the NHS website)
University of Sunderland
University of Central Lancashire
University of the West of England


When I applied it was only University of Bradford and Bristol University that ran the course with Bradford being the first to run it. I guess we had the bonus of having the Uni most experienced with the course but the option of that fairly large list would have been nice.
i've read around and Bradford and Manchester Met seem like two really good options, the only problem is I've really based my personal statement around the Biomedical science course so i wouldn't really know how to change it to suit both the HCS course and the biomedical science.
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(Original post by Charles97)
Very little job opportunity and a course commonly used as a GEM application.
Spoken like someone with no experience of the Biomedical Science courses. Out of the crop of ~100 in my year less than 10 were remotely interested in medicine. Interested involved diagnostic laboratory medicine, postgraduate study/research, clinical research/trials etc.
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(Original post by KaranKKC)
i've read around and Bradford and Manchester Met seem like two really good options, the only problem is I've really based my personal statement around the Biomedical science course so i wouldn't really know how to change it to suit both the HCS course and the biomedical science.
I genuinely don't believe you would need to. Tweak a few words and talk about Healthcare Science and it's applicable. The courses in first and second year are 99% identical. Literally the only difference is one module at Bradford where the BMS course do Developing Professional Skills and HCS do Work-Based Learning and Professional Practice which incorporates your registration portfolio and placements.

You've just missed a open day on the 5th for Bradford but there is one on the 23rd of Nov if you can get along and ask any questions. I know if Bradford rejected you on Healthcare Science they quite often offer you Biomedical Science among other courses as alternatives unless you completely flunk.
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KaranKKC
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
I genuinely don't believe you would need to. Tweak a few words and talk about Healthcare Science and it's applicable. The courses in first and second year are 99% identical. Literally the only difference is one module at Bradford where the BMS course do Developing Professional Skills and HCS do Work-Based Learning and Professional Practice which incorporates your registration portfolio and placements.

You've just missed a open day on the 5th for Bradford but there is one on the 23rd of Nov if you can get along and ask any questions. I know if Bradford rejected you on Healthcare Science they quite often offer you Biomedical Science among other courses as alternatives unless you completely flunk.
thank you so much for your help truly. also if i get accepted into the healthcare course at Bradford of Manchester Met would i be able to go onto careers similar to those if i did the BMS, excluding becoming a biomedical scientist.
im sill not sure how i would be able to incorporate the HCS without making it irrelevant to the BMS, or should i just talk about the aspects of both HCS and BMS that are identical. how would i be able to develop and expand on including the microbiology/ pathology modules in my personal statement.
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(Original post by KaranKKC)
thank you so much for your help truly. also if i get accepted into the healthcare course at Bradford of Manchester Met would i be able to go onto careers similar to those if i did the BMS, excluding becoming a biomedical scientist.
im sill not sure how i would be able to incorporate the HCS without making it irrelevant to the BMS, or should i just talk about the aspects of both HCS and BMS that are identical. how would i be able to develop and expand on including the microbiology/ pathology modules in my personal statement.
Yes you will definitely have all the non-BMS careers available to you.

The options given to you on the course to specialise into for your final year are:
Infection Science (Microbiology, Virology and Serology)
Blood Science (Biochemistry, Haematology and Transfusion Science
Cellular Science (Histology and Cytology)
Genetics

I imagine you have an idea about what excites you, just talk about why it excites you and why you want to work in a NHS laboratory. The main difference between a HCS personal statement and a BMS one is I thin it is quite important to talk about the NHS. You can still use this statement for your BMS applications because you could be potentially applying to them to go the long way round to the BMS job. A bit like how you can use a medicine personal statement for a biology degree because of the potential graduate entry.
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KaranKKC
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
Yes you will definitely have all the non-BMS careers available to you.

The options given to you on the course to specialise into for your final year are:
Infection Science (Microbiology, Virology and Serology)
Blood Science (Biochemistry, Haematology and Transfusion Science
Cellular Science (Histology and Cytology)
Genetics

I imagine you have an idea about what excites you, just talk about why it excites you and why you want to work in a NHS laboratory. The main difference between a HCS personal statement and a BMS one is I thin it is quite important to talk about the NHS. You can still use this statement for your BMS applications because you could be potentially applying to them to go the long way round to the BMS job. A bit like how you can use a medicine personal statement for a biology degree because of the potential graduate entry.
so could i really go into detail about microbiology, but i would want to be able to incorporate the NHS into that as well, I'm not sure how. because i think that microbiology is in all the courses BMS and HCS. also do you think that talking about my voluntary work at the British heart foundation would be useful or not. also would it be any use in stating how biology and geo at a level can help me, because they could develop practical skills?
this is all so stressful :eek::eek:
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(Original post by KaranKKC)
so could i really go into detail about microbiology, but i would want to be able to incorporate the NHS into that as well, I'm not sure how. because i think that microbiology is in all the courses BMS and HCS. also do you think that talking about my voluntary work at the British heart foundation would be useful or not. also would it be any use in stating how biology and geo at a level can help me, because they could develop practical skills?
this is all so stressful :eek::eek:
So I think you can use your volunteering work to discuss how you want to work in an area that provides some help to people.

I think your biology A level can be discussed since there will be heavy human biology but it is very different.

In a Microbiology laboratory tests are run on urine for UTI's, faeces, sputum, swabs, gynae samples for chlamydia and gonorrhea, tissues and fluids. Microscope work is common. A lot of problem solving, the main thing that draws people to micro is the idea that it is a puzzle. You'd be working in a multi-disciplinary team of biomedical scientists, lab assistants, medical consultants and more so team work and working with a variety of people is something to mention too.
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Charles97
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
Spoken like someone with no experience of the Biomedical Science courses. Out of the crop of ~100 in my year less than 10 were remotely interested in medicine. Interested involved diagnostic laboratory medicine, postgraduate study/research, clinical research/trials etc.
I'm glad you are passionate for the subject. I think it's a breath of fresh air considering most people apply so they can do graduate entry courses. I know 4 people that have graduated with a biomed degree, 3 with a 2:1 and one with a 1st. As far as I know, 3 of them are unemployed and work low pay full time jobs. I'm just going from my opinion.

Who knows, maybe the role will develop as much as pharmacy is at the moment.
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KaranKKC
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
So I think you can use your volunteering work to discuss how you want to work in an area that provides some help to people.

I think your biology A level can be discussed since there will be heavy human biology but it is very different.

In a Microbiology laboratory tests are run on urine for UTI's, faeces, sputum, swabs, gynae samples for chlamydia and gonorrhea, tissues and fluids. Microscope work is common. A lot of problem solving, the main thing that draws people to micro is the idea that it is a puzzle. You'd be working in a multi-disciplinary team of biomedical scientists, lab assistants, medical consultants and more so team work and working with a variety of people is something to mention too.
Thank you so would you think it would be better for me to focus on the Biology aspect or more on Microbiology as its something I'm more interested in
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(Original post by KaranKKC)
Thank you so would you think it would be better for me to focus on the Biology aspect or more on Microbiology as its something I'm more interested in
Bit of both
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