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How did you tell your GP about your depression/anxiety? (my first time) watch

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    I've been seeing a counselor at university for 2 months now and she's told me I need to get it diagnosed properly from my GP now if I want to access better support at university (e.g if I need adjustments made to exams or deadlines) - and I know that I really need this.
    She also gave me a medical form that I have to give to my GP and ask them to fill it out... it's basically a Disability form and the GP has to declare that I have a mental or physical illness that's preventing me from doing every day things to my best ability e.g concentrating in lectures etc I usually end up leaving halfway because I get so tired and feel like I'm not learning.

    I'm just really nervous about how I'm going to bring this up.. I know I have a problem because I've been seeing a counselor for 8 weeks at university and she's said that she can tell I have a lot of anxiety and that I've been depressed due to recent bereavement. I'm comfortable speaking to her about how I feel because I've seen her so many times now but I feel like I won't be able to open up to a GP because I don't know them.

    Whenever we go to the GP, we get a different doctor every time, so I don't have a regular doctor, meaning it's just going to be a complete stranger. Sometimes I accompany a family member to appointments so I kind of know the doctors who are there, but this is making me feel awkward because they've probably seen me so many times accompanying my parent for their problems and now suddenly I'm going to be turning up alone.

    I just feel like I won't be able to open up properly and that they'll think there's nothing wrong with me and they won't fill in the medical form that I need for university.

    Has anyone else been through this - how did you approach your GP about your depression? What was the conversation like? Had you been to counselling before your appointment? Did you need them to fill out a medical form for university?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've been seeing a counselor at university for 2 months now and she's told me I need to get it diagnosed properly from my GP now if I want to access better support at university (e.g if I need adjustments made to exams or deadlines) - and I know that I really need this.
    She also gave me a medical form that I have to give to my GP and ask them to fill it out... it's basically a Disability form and the GP has to declare that I have a mental or physical illness that's preventing me from doing every day things to my best ability e.g concentrating in lectures etc I usually end up leaving halfway because I get so tired and feel like I'm not learning.

    I'm just really nervous about how I'm going to bring this up.. I know I have a problem because I've been seeing a counselor for 8 weeks at university and she's said that she can tell I have a lot of anxiety and that I've been depressed due to recent bereavement. I'm comfortable speaking to her about how I feel because I've seen her so many times now but I feel like I won't be able to open up to a GP because I don't know them.

    Whenever we go to the GP, we get a different doctor every time, so I don't have a regular doctor, meaning it's just going to be a complete stranger. Sometimes I accompany a family member to appointments so I kind of know the doctors who are there, but this is making me feel awkward because they've probably seen me so many times accompanying my parent for their problems and now suddenly I'm going to be turning up alone.

    I just feel like I won't be able to open up properly and that they'll think there's nothing wrong with me and they won't fill in the medical form that I need for university.

    Has anyone else been through this - how did you approach your GP about your depression? What was the conversation like? Had you been to counselling before your appointment? Did you need them to fill out a medical form for university?
    Mind.org has some good advice for a first appointment with your doc. It also has some good info and advice in general so is worth checking out if you haven't already.
    I would suggest you write everything you want to say down before you go in so you can use it to prompt yourself or even just pass it to them if you get nervous. Include things like asking about treatment options and for them to fill in the form. You may want to book a double appointment to give yourself some extra time to talk things through without feeling pressured. Also include things that would count as evidence, just as you would with a physical condition. Mention that you have been seeing a counsellor and any ways in which it affects your life and include how long it's been going on for.

    Unfortionately doctors will sometimes be less understanding than they probably should be and you may find that you are not too happy with your first appointment. If that happens, do not feel discouraged and just go back.

    I was diagnosed right at the end of college and when I was accepted to uni I was told to apply for DSA. The doctor had to sign something for evidence and then I was given an asessment. It really helps to have a good idea of what you struggle with and what might help you before the asessment.
    I'll be honest, my first appointment wasn't the best. I was so nervous I just handed over my note and wasn't good at being honest about how I was feeling. I kinda played it down a little and that ended up with me needing to go back. Eventually though I was taken seriously and was given group therapy and ADs which really helped me.

    My best advice to you is to stick to your guns. Only you know how you are feeling and if it is an issue. If you feel like people aren't taking you seriously, make them. Be sure to be honest about things, even anything you are scared to mention and make it clear how much it is affecting you. If you want a treatment or something, ask.

    Hope that helps and if you have any other questions feel free to ask.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've been seeing a counselor at university for 2 months now and she's told me I need to get it diagnosed properly from my GP now if I want to access better support at university (e.g if I need adjustments made to exams or deadlines) - and I know that I really need this.
    She also gave me a medical form that I have to give to my GP and ask them to fill it out... it's basically a Disability form and the GP has to declare that I have a mental or physical illness that's preventing me from doing every day things to my best ability e.g concentrating in lectures etc I usually end up leaving halfway because I get so tired and feel like I'm not learning.

    I'm just really nervous about how I'm going to bring this up.. I know I have a problem because I've been seeing a counselor for 8 weeks at university and she's said that she can tell I have a lot of anxiety and that I've been depressed due to recent bereavement. I'm comfortable speaking to her about how I feel because I've seen her so many times now but I feel like I won't be able to open up to a GP because I don't know them.

    Whenever we go to the GP, we get a different doctor every time, so I don't have a regular doctor, meaning it's just going to be a complete stranger. Sometimes I accompany a family member to appointments so I kind of know the doctors who are there, but this is making me feel awkward because they've probably seen me so many times accompanying my parent for their problems and now suddenly I'm going to be turning up alone.

    I just feel like I won't be able to open up properly and that they'll think there's nothing wrong with me and they won't fill in the medical form that I need for university.

    Has anyone else been through this - how did you approach your GP about your depression? What was the conversation like? Had you been to counselling before your appointment? Did you need them to fill out a medical form for university?
    Just tell them- yes I know thats unhelpful. It just depends what sort of person you are and how you communicate.

    Taking a step back and your concerns, then if I were you I would write it down and either use the notes as a prompt or give them a note for them to read. they are trained to diagnose, so you can get it faster and more accurately if you give them the information they need.

    Explain how you feel- nervous etc.

    That you have been seeing a counsellor for x weeks and she suggested you need a proper diagnosis.

    Then explain some of the things about your background (the bereavement especially) and any other factual events or situations that you are finding it difficult to deal with.

    Then explain some of how it affects you and how it makes you feel.
    You can do a symptoms checklist- linked below- plus examples

    Then explain what you want from them.
    Assistance and that your counselor has given you a form that needs their approval for you to get some assistance at uni.

    It should be a straightforward talk. If you are unable to talk just give them the preprepared note and they will sort it for you. Also you can worry less about not getting the right things said. They will see this every day, so worry less about being unusual. it is very common.

    Answer any additional questions.

    http://www.nhs.uk/Tools/Pages/depression.aspx

    http://healingheartscc.com/docs/firs...essionQuiz.pdf
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    +1 to what kindred said about mind if they have an article on it. the importnat thing is to get to your target which for you menas saying what you need to say plus hopefully getting a diagnosis, assistance and the form signed.
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    When I went to talk to my doctor about my Depression and Anxiety, I simply went for it and said that I felt I had Depression. My doctor made me talk about my symptoms (what I was experiencing, how long I had experienced it for etc) for a while, and then he made me answer questions. After that he informed me he felt confident that a diagnosis of Depression would be correct. Although, I do know that not all appointments will go so smoothly.

    If you don't feel confident in your ability to recall or explain your symptoms I would definitely write it down, even if it is just in bullet form. This can be really useful as it provides more insight for your doctor, and can also alleviate the pressure off of you.

    I haven't been to counselling before or after the diagnosis, instead relying on medication.

    This website - http://www.itv.com/thismorning/mental-health-helplines - is full of mental health helplines and resources. This can be great if you need more advice and/or want support. I really recommend talking through it with one of the helplines. It can really help you with your appointment, coping with your diagnosis (whether they diagnose you or not), and can be a really good support system.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    Mind.org has some good advice for a first appointment with your doc. It also has some good info and advice in general so is worth checking out if you haven't already.
    I would suggest you write everything you want to say down before you go in so you can use it to prompt yourself or even just pass it to them if you get nervous. Include things like asking about treatment options and for them to fill in the form. You may want to book a double appointment to give yourself some extra time to talk things through without feeling pressured. Also include things that would count as evidence, just as you would with a physical condition. Mention that you have been seeing a counsellor and any ways in which it affects your life and include how long it's been going on for.

    Unfortionately doctors will sometimes be less understanding than they probably should be and you may find that you are not too happy with your first appointment. If that happens, do not feel discouraged and just go back.

    I was diagnosed right at the end of college and when I was accepted to uni I was told to apply for DSA. The doctor had to sign something for evidence and then I was given an asessment. It really helps to have a good idea of what you struggle with and what might help you before the asessment.
    I'll be honest, my first appointment wasn't the best. I was so nervous I just handed over my note and wasn't good at being honest about how I was feeling. I kinda played it down a little and that ended up with me needing to go back. Eventually though I was taken seriously and was given group therapy and ADs which really helped me.

    My best advice to you is to stick to your guns. Only you know how you are feeling and if it is an issue. If you feel like people aren't taking you seriously, make them. Be sure to be honest about things, even anything you are scared to mention and make it clear how much it is affecting you. If you want a treatment or something, ask.

    Hope that helps and if you have any other questions feel free to ask.
    Thanks for replying. What was your assessment like? The woman I've been talking to at uni has told me that I need to fill in this medical form as a way to access support from disability services at university and then they can override decisions about exams or trips made by my lecturers and they can make adjustments for me when I need them. I'm not sure if I'm doing the same thing that you did? I just hope that this will be the end of it after I see the GP and get this medical form filled in... I started seeing the counselor because of anxieties I was having about a compulsory residential trip and then she said it seems like a more serious/long term issue and I should go to the GP now and then the disability team can make adjustments for me on the trip to make me more comfortable... I just really hope it's that straight forward. I really don't feel comfortable seeing so many strangers and speaking to them about the problems I'm having but some of my lecturers have been so rude to me I feel like they genuinely won't believe me until I get some proper confirmation from the GP and support from the disability team.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Just tell them- yes I know thats unhelpful. It just depends what sort of person you are and how you communicate.

    Taking a step back and your concerns, then if I were you I would write it down and either use the notes as a prompt or give them a note for them to read. they are trained to diagnose, so you can get it faster and more accurately if you give them the information they need.

    Explain how you feel- nervous etc.

    That you have been seeing a counsellor for x weeks and she suggested you need a proper diagnosis.

    Then explain some of the things about your background (the bereavement especially) and any other factual events or situations that you are finding it difficult to deal with.

    Then explain some of how it affects you and how it makes you feel.
    You can do a symptoms checklist- linked below- plus examples

    Then explain what you want from them.
    Assistance and that your counselor has given you a form that needs their approval for you to get some assistance at uni.

    It should be a straightforward talk. If you are unable to talk just give them the preprepared note and they will sort it for you. Also you can worry less about not getting the right things said. They will see this every day, so worry less about being unusual. it is very common.

    Answer any additional questions.

    http://www.nhs.uk/Tools/Pages/depression.aspx

    http://healingheartscc.com/docs/firs...essionQuiz.pdf
    Thanks so much. I've looked at a few of those depression diagnosis quizzes before and a lot of them ask about self harm/suicidal thoughts and that's honestly the opposite of how I feel. I feel like I have so many burdens and responsibilities and things that I'm stressed about and that's the reason I'm depressed.. like I'm trying my best to balance things and to make an effort at university but I feel like the lecturers aren't being reasonable sometimes because they don't think I have a real problem. So yeah the suicidal/self harm thoughts almost never cross my mind - do you think this is a vital part of the diagnosis though?
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    (Original post by EmmaCx)
    When I went to talk to my doctor about my Depression and Anxiety, I simply went for it and said that I felt I had Depression. My doctor made me talk about my symptoms (what I was experiencing, how long I had experienced it for etc) for a while, and then he made me answer questions. After that he informed me he felt confident that a diagnosis of Depression would be correct. Although, I do know that not all appointments will go so smoothly.

    If you don't feel confident in your ability to recall or explain your symptoms I would definitely write it down, even if it is just in bullet form. This can be really useful as it provides more insight for your doctor, and can also alleviate the pressure off of you.

    I haven't been to counselling before or after the diagnosis, instead relying on medication.

    This website - http://www.itv.com/thismorning/mental-health-helplines - is full of mental health helplines and resources. This can be great if you need more advice and/or want support. I really recommend talking through it with one of the helplines. It can really help you with your appointment, coping with your diagnosis (whether they diagnose you or not), and can be a really good support system.
    Thanks for the reply. I do feel like I'm wasting a doctor's time by calling up to make an appointment about depression.. that's why I've been putting it off for so long. I feel like it is one of those things that they don't really take seriously and if I go in with my medical form from university it looks like I just came in to get something signed. I mean when I'm with my counselor I get really emotional and I cry a lot and open up to her so much but if a friend or stranger asked me about it I would probably be a bit more closed. I feel like I seem quite normal, maybe just tired on the outside, and that can give people the impression that nothing is really wrong with you.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thanks so much. I've looked at a few of those depression diagnosis quizzes before and a lot of them ask about self harm/suicidal thoughts and that's honestly the opposite of how I feel. I feel like I have so many burdens and responsibilities and things that I'm stressed about and that's the reason I'm depressed.. like I'm trying my best to balance things and to make an effort at university but I feel like the lecturers aren't being reasonable sometimes because they don't think I have a real problem. So yeah the suicidal/self harm thoughts almost never cross my mind - do you think this is a vital part of the diagnosis though?
    The burns link is straightforward- fill it out and hand it him/her. Its information they want. If need be annotate it. If you dont feel suicidal then just put zero. They need to assess you. Dont forget they havent met you and they need to consider everything until they get an appreciation of where the issues are.

    Let the GP do the thinking and you be helpful by not leaving anything out.

    Make a mind map of all the things woryying and affecting you then show what the effect is.

    It is something they need to consider, but of not applicable its still importnat they considered it , so they know they did a full assessment. Seriously go and get it done, do as above and you will feel a lot better for things.

    You are least helpful if you dont talk. let them make sense of it if need be or fo through it with them to make sure no misunderstandings have happened.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thanks for replying. What was your assessment like? The woman I've been talking to at uni has told me that I need to fill in this medical form as a way to access support from disability services at university and then they can override decisions about exams or trips made by my lecturers and they can make adjustments for me when I need them. I'm not sure if I'm doing the same thing that you did? I just hope that this will be the end of it after I see the GP and get this medical form filled in... I started seeing the counselor because of anxieties I was having about a compulsory residential trip and then she said it seems like a more serious/long term issue and I should go to the GP now and then the disability team can make adjustments for me on the trip to make me more comfortable... I just really hope it's that straight forward. I really don't feel comfortable seeing so many strangers and speaking to them about the problems I'm having but some of my lecturers have been so rude to me I feel like they genuinely won't believe me until I get some proper confirmation from the GP and support from the disability team.
    Well weather they would believe you or not you can just wait to tell people until after you've seen the GP and sorted out all the stuff you need to with the disability team. You won't need to talk to lecturers about it if you don't want to btw cos thte disability team can do that for you.

    I'm not sure if what you're doing at the moment is DSA. It sounds more like an internal thing within uni. You might want to ask about DSA since it could give you access to other support uni can't give, but what you are doing at the moment sounds like it will help so keep at that too. DSA can take a while so it migh not help you in time for your trip.
    My asessment was fine. It's a bit awkward and embarassing, but the lady was really nice and tried to think of ways to help me.

    Try to remember that although it is awkward talking to strangers about it seeing your doctor is your way to support and it's best to be as honest as you can be to get the best help you can. Also try to keep the disability team up to date because it can make things simpler. If later you are starting to get nervous about anything like a trip or piece of work again let them know. I know with DSA you can get meetings with a support worker so you might be able to get that. I had weekly sessions where I could have a chat about how things were going and mention any concerns. It can be helpful to have that safety net and it also means you'll develop a relationship with somebody who can talk to lecturesrs etc for you so getting help in the future may feel less awkward for you.

    It sounds like you're heading down the right track so just keep doing that, try not to worry and let the disability team know if you have any concerns. Think of them as your support network. If you need anything you can go to them
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've been seeing a counselor at university for 2 months now and she's told me I need to get it diagnosed properly from my GP now if I want to access better support at university (e.g if I need adjustments made to exams or deadlines) - and I know that I really need this.
    She also gave me a medical form that I have to give to my GP and ask them to fill it out... it's basically a Disability form and the GP has to declare that I have a mental or physical illness that's preventing me from doing every day things to my best ability e.g concentrating in lectures etc I usually end up leaving halfway because I get so tired and feel like I'm not learning.

    I'm just really nervous about how I'm going to bring this up.. I know I have a problem because I've been seeing a counselor for 8 weeks at university and she's said that she can tell I have a lot of anxiety and that I've been depressed due to recent bereavement. I'm comfortable speaking to her about how I feel because I've seen her so many times now but I feel like I won't be able to open up to a GP because I don't know them.

    Whenever we go to the GP, we get a different doctor every time, so I don't have a regular doctor, meaning it's just going to be a complete stranger. Sometimes I accompany a family member to appointments so I kind of know the doctors who are there, but this is making me feel awkward because they've probably seen me so many times accompanying my parent for their problems and now suddenly I'm going to be turning up alone.

    I just feel like I won't be able to open up properly and that they'll think there's nothing wrong with me and they won't fill in the medical form that I need for university.

    Has anyone else been through this - how did you approach your GP about your depression? What was the conversation like? Had you been to counselling before your appointment? Did you need them to fill out a medical form for university?
    My doctor took it seriously, unlike some people I know... my mum just said to him "Connor (me) has been really struggling with anxiety, depression etc. So he asked me a couple of questions about what I find difficult and that was it.

    I've been on some kind of disability benefit for a couple of months now because I am utterly incapable of doing everyday things - like leaving the house for more than 5 minutes, speaking to a receptionist, talking on the phone blah blah blah.... Just going to see the doctor itself was really difficult for me. I'm really struggling mentally atm :cry2:
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thanks for the reply. I do feel like I'm wasting a doctor's time by calling up to make an appointment about depression.. that's why I've been putting it off for so long. I feel like it is one of those things that they don't really take seriously and if I go in with my medical form from university it looks like I just came in to get something signed. I mean when I'm with my counselor I get really emotional and I cry a lot and open up to her so much but if a friend or stranger asked me about it I would probably be a bit more closed. I feel like I seem quite normal, maybe just tired on the outside, and that can give people the impression that nothing is really wrong with you.
    This is just procratsination and excuse making.

    You have a condition that you need diagnised. It is affecting you. The Dr needs to assess it but cnat if you never go. Your reasons for not going do not appear to be sound. Give them the infomration i suggested and then they can diagnose you. They must have hundreds of people on their list witch such a diagnosis.

    Fill out the form. Tell them about the bereavment and how it affects you. They have to take you at your word.
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    I've been seeing a counselor at university for 2 months now and she's told me I need to get it diagnosed properly from my GP now if I want to access better support at university (e.g if I need adjustments made to exams or deadlines) - and I know that I really need this.
    She also gave me a medical form that I have to give to my GP and ask them to fill it out... it's basically a Disability form and the GP has to declare that I have a mental or physical illness that's preventing me from doing every day things to my best ability e.g concentrating in lectures etc I usually end up leaving halfway because I get so tired and feel like I'm not learning.

    I'm just really nervous about how I'm going to bring this up.. I know I have a problem because I've been seeing a counselor for 8 weeks at university and she's said that she can tell I have a lot of anxiety and that I've been depressed due to recent bereavement. I'm comfortable speaking to her about how I feel because I've seen her so many times now but I feel like I won't be able to open up to a GP because I don't know them.

    Whenever we go to the GP, we get a different doctor every time, so I don't have a regular doctor, meaning it's just going to be a complete stranger. Sometimes I accompany a family member to appointments so I kind of know the doctors who are there, but this is making me feel awkward because they've probably seen me so many times accompanying my parent for their problems and now suddenly I'm going to be turning up alone.

    I just feel like I won't be able to open up properly and that they'll think there's nothing wrong with me and they won't fill in the medical form that I need for university.

    Has anyone else been through this - how did you approach your GP about your depression? What was the conversation like? Had you been to counselling before your appointment? Did you need them to fill out a medical form for university?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've been seeing a counselor at university for 2 months now and she's told me I need to get it diagnosed properly from my GP now if I want to access better support at university (e.g if I need adjustments made to exams or deadlines) - and I know that I really need this.
    She also gave me a medical form that I have to give to my GP and ask them to fill it out... it's basically a Disability form and the GP has to declare that I have a mental or physical illness that's preventing me from doing every day things to my best ability e.g concentrating in lectures etc I usually end up leaving halfway because I get so tired and feel like I'm not learning.

    I'm just really nervous about how I'm going to bring this up.. I know I have a problem because I've been seeing a counselor for 8 weeks at university and she's said that she can tell I have a lot of anxiety and that I've been depressed due to recent bereavement. I'm comfortable speaking to her about how I feel because I've seen her so many times now but I feel like I won't be able to open up to a GP because I don't know them.

    Whenever we go to the GP, we get a different doctor every time, so I don't have a regular doctor, meaning it's just going to be a complete stranger. Sometimes I accompany a family member to appointments so I kind of know the doctors who are there, but this is making me feel awkward because they've probably seen me so many times accompanying my parent for their problems and now suddenly I'm going to be turning up alone.

    I just feel like I won't be able to open up properly and that they'll think there's nothing wrong with me and they won't fill in the medical form that I need for university.

    Has anyone else been through this - how did you approach your GP about your depression? What was the conversation like? Had you been to counselling before your appointment? Did you need them to fill out a medical form for university?
    Hello! :hugs:

    First of all, I just want to say I think you're really brave for doing this. :yep:

    As for the GP problem: when I went to the GP, I just explained how I felt etc. She asked some questions, and then I got referred to MH services (though this was during my A2s, so I was not at uni then). I had had counselling before, but it was not effective at all. I think the reason you need the form filled out is because the only way to get reasonable adjustments etc at uni is through DSA, and you need medical evidence to be approved for that.

    Is it possible for you to ask for a specific GP when you make a doctor or is all just completely random?
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    GPs usually like to have a clear and concise presentation of the problem and what they are being asked to do:

    - You are basically wanting a medical note to access the University support services . So if you say this near the start of your consultation, it will help.

    - The GP will definitely feel more comfortable if they are reassured that some other professional has already done some basic 'screening'. So if you can be clear that you've been seeing a counsellor for some time and that s/he has recommended that you follow this process, and that you should see the GP, that should really help

    - try and prepare your thoughts around what your main symptoms are - and especially, the impact it has had on your everyday functioning. Make sure you don't underplay how difficult it has been to get up in the morning, or attend lectures, or concentrate on work etc - and try to quantify it if you can ("I have missed three quarters of my scheduled lectures...every essay deadline...stopped going out to socialise..." etc)

    It will feel scary right now, but GPs spend their whole day, every day, dealing with this. They won't think anything bad of you. Some of them are a bit crap at it, it's true. But you need this right now, and will feel better for having sorted it. Good luck.
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    I booked an appointment but they said I'm going to have to speak to the GP on the phone first before he agrees to make an appointment with me, so I'm really nervous about what I'll say. Thanks everyone who replies
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I booked an appointment but they said I'm going to have to speak to the GP on the phone first before he agrees to make an appointment with me, so I'm really nervous about what I'll say. Thanks everyone who replies
    Fill out the burns assessment I linked you with.

    Then give him a very brief snapshot of what I indicated previously.

    Who you are.
    That you have recently suffered a bereavment and anxiety issues- that you have been to counseling for x weeks and they suggested you needed to discuss this with the GP.

    Tell them some symptoms and that you are distressed and having difficulty coping.

    Just to add its their job to diagnose you. be clear in getting the information across and they will see you. Its the quickest way to get you what you want and ready to move onto the next stage.
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    Is this thread duplicated?

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...060&highlight=
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    I was lucky in regards that I was diagnosed with OCD and a few other things as a child so my GP always knew about my MH but when I went to a new GP, despite them having my records, they acted like this was a complete shock and I was telling them my story and diagnosis from scratch.

    How it goes when explaining your MH concerns to a GP can be really difficult to predict. I've had some very empathetic doctors who put me at ease and showed me they were on my side and then I had others that played my suffering down and basically just told me to go outside and meditate.

    I always found starting up the conversation to be the hardest part. Once I got into the swing of it, the rest of the convo came naturally. My mind would often go blank so I wrote down the key points and if I was in a bad state would bring a carer such as my mum or partner in with me to help explain things better or let the doc read what I had wrote down and then they could ask me questions.

    They then ask you questions such as - has anything happened to trigger these feelings? How long have the feelings lasted? Do you ever feel suicidal? Do you have a family history of MH problems? How much has this impacted on your day to day life? And they will ask about uni and then is when you could mention you are looking for an official diagnosis in order to get more support at uni.

    They will then offer you treatment. This will either be some self help or support groups if they think your case is very mild, medications ranging from beta blockers to antidepressants and/or therapy such as CBT. You don't have to go along with any treatment you don't feel comfortable with.

    All in all, I would say the first appointment talking about it is the hardest but if the doctor is empathetic and on your side, then your battle is half way won. It takes a lot of courage to seek help so you have already taken the first big step even considering going to a GP :hugs: good luck
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by OxFossil)
    Is this thread duplicated?

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...060&highlight=
    Sorry I didnt realise this, it didn't get posted in the Mental Health forum straight away so I made it again in General Health. Could a mod delete the other thread or maybe merge them together as there were some good answers there too I've just seen
 
 
 
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