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Can't decide between Biochemistry and English Literature. watch

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    The decision will come from me at the end of the day but here are my thoughts about the two courses. Please share your opinion on my situation :P

    Biochemistry/Biomed (applying for both): I am good at science and there are modules on cancer biology as well as neuroscience. I get to understand the processes that happen inside us as well as what the body does when things fail. However, there is long lab hours (might get used to it) and it may get tricky and overwhelming (but I always try my best). I may not want a science job but who knows, the broad career prospects it gives is great.

    English literature: I am naturally better at. I am creative, and I like looking at different eras in literature and just understanding and analysing meanings of humanity. I know I will do well at but it might be playing too safe, there is less contact hours with tutors and more restrictive career prospects after graduating. I also don't read a lot but when I do, I enjoy reading and criticising different literature formats.

    I hope I make my mind up soon. Whichever path I choose, I know that I will happy and again, I'm just looking for some thoughts and guidance. Thanks
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    Just a couple things.

    Most graduate jobs are non-subject specific. You can therefore apply to them with either degree. But you're right, there are probably more jobs which require a specific biochem degree than there are those that specifically want an English Literature degree.

    It is a very personal decision. I had a similar conflict some years ago. Mine was between linguistics and medicine. I chose medicine but then life pushed me towards biochemistry! All I can suggest is doing a bit more further reading and perhaps having a look at some degree programme structures. Remember there is a lot more to the degree than the specific part you like.
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    (Original post by pizza23)
    The decision will come from me at the end of the day but here are my thoughts about the two courses. Please share your opinion on my situation :P

    Biochemistry/Biomed (applying for both): I am good at science and there are modules on cancer biology as well as neuroscience. I get to understand the processes that happen inside us as well as what the body does when things fail. However, there is long lab hours (might get used to it) and it may get tricky and overwhelming (but I always try my best). I may not want a science job but who knows, the broad career prospects it gives is great.

    English literature: I am naturally better at. I am creative, and I like looking at different eras in literature and just understanding and analysing meanings of humanity. I know I will do well at but it might be playing too safe, there is less contact hours with tutors and more restrictive career prospects after graduating. I also don't read a lot but when I do, I enjoy reading and criticising different literature formats.

    I hope I make my mind up soon. Whichever path I choose, I know that I will happy and again, I'm just looking for some thoughts and guidance. Thanks
    I think you're right in thinking of the broadness of doing a degree in bioscience - however I think, paradoxically, it's limiting your opportunities to venture outside your field if you do something of a particular science. It would be more broader to do something like Biology or whatnot. But by focusing on a particular branch of Science, you limit yourself in that respect.

    It really doesn't matter if you are naturally better at something in all honesty. I am naturally better at English Language to that of English Literature, but I prefer writing about literature than I do language which is why I ended up doing a Lit degree instead. If you need to enjoy it rather than doing something because you're better at it.

    Most jobs nowadays you doesn't ask for a specific degrees (however a career does; i.e you cant enter the medical career with a lit degree; likewise you can't enter the publishing career with a degree in chemical engineering). I think it's worth trying to research career opportunities within both disciplines and see if you can get some work experience relating to both. Working in a carer's home or hospital admin for the science one and then maybe working in a local newspaper printing office or maybe some kind of journalism just to see how you'd need different skills from the degrees to help you with those particular jobs.

    PS: by working I meant volunteering.
 
 
 
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