Has anyone actually CURED their depression? Watch

Anonymous #1
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Not just 'low mood' but I-don't-feel-like-leaving-my-bed-ever-again' type.......
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Anonymous #2
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I did, but my circumstances were far from typical so i'm probably not the most representative example.
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Anonymous #3
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I was only depressed for a few months when my parents told me they were getting divorced. I also developed some anxiety but not too severe.
I started to come out of it around 5 months after they told me, and a few months after that they decided not to get divorced so I'm not sure if that helped me along a little. I still get panic attacks from time to time but induced under very specific conditions. I rarely feel depressed any more although I have those days.
I can't really work out why/how I came out of it, perhaps because it wasn't clinical but rather definitely caused by a singular event which I ended up getting over? Not really sure.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I did, but my circumstances were far from typical so i'm probably not the most representative example.
Mind sharing how you did it? Drugs, therapy etc.?


(Original post by Anonymous)
I was only depressed for a few months when my parents told me they were getting divorced. I also developed some anxiety but not too severe.
I started to come out of it around 5 months after they told me, and a few months after that they decided not to get divorced so I'm not sure if that helped me along a little. I still get panic attacks from time to time but induced under very specific conditions. I rarely feel depressed any more although I have those days.
I can't really work out why/how I came out of it, perhaps because it wasn't clinical but rather definitely caused by a singular event which I ended up getting over? Not really sure.
I see. Sorry to hear that, must've been stressful. Glad you're better now.
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Barbastelle
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Not just 'low mood' but I-don't-feel-like-leaving-my-bed-ever-again' type.......
Depends on your definition of 'cured'.
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Anonymous #4
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I'm not sure about "cured" as such, but I am doing so so so much better now I've found the right medication and I really pushed towards leading a normal life again
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Anonymous #3
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I see. Sorry to hear that, must've been stressful. Glad you're better now.
Thanks very much
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Barbastelle)
Depends on your definition of 'cured'.
Back to how you were BEFORE it started. To me, minor mood lifts are not even worth the effort.

(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm not sure about "cured" as such, but I am doing so so so much better now I've found the right medication and I really pushed towards leading a normal life again
I see, thanks for sharing your experience
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Anonymous #5
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Not just 'low mood' but I-don't-feel-like-leaving-my-bed-ever-again' type.......
I think so. I don't have days where I don't feel like leaving my bed anymore. But I am still quite isolated.
I've gone from hardly attending lectures in first year, spending days sat in bed, eating junk food every day to now (in third year) full attendance, getting up early and going to the gym most days. I basically forced myself out of my comfort zone and, whilst it was hard at first, I am much better off now. Also, working out helps me a lot. If I don't go to the gym for 2+ days I start feeling low again.
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Petulia
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I've been seeing a counselor because people kept telling me that it can ease your depression, and while it is helpful to have someone who listens and being able to cry things out once a week, I don't really see it helping me in the long term. It fulfils that part of me which desperately needs someone to open up to and share things with, so I feel like someone cares and so I don't feel alone, but I feel like it's a bit of a temporary fix.

It feels like when I talk to her I get so many things off my chest and I feel so relieved afterwards to know that someone has just let me vent out all of the horrible thoughts I'd been having, as if she's just put a plaster over me. But over the week the same feelings start to come back and it's as if the plaster is getting old and starting to peel off and I need to see her again the next week to get a new plaster.


I would be really interested to know if counselling or therapy has worked for anyone else though as a treatment for depression, so I will keep watching this thread, it's a really good question that no one has ever really answered for me either.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Petulia)
I've been seeing a counselor because people kept telling me that it can ease your depression, and while it is helpful to have someone who listens and being able to cry things out once a week, I don't really see it helping me in the long term. It fulfils that part of me which desperately needs someone to open up to and share things with, so I feel like someone cares and so I don't feel alone, but I feel like it's a bit of a temporary fix.

It feels like when I talk to her I get so many things off my chest and I feel so relieved afterwards to know that someone has just let me vent out all of the horrible thoughts I'd been having, as if she's just put a plaster over me. But over the week the same feelings start to come back and it's as if the plaster is getting old and starting to peel off and I need to see her again the next week to get a new plaster.


I would be really interested to know if counselling or therapy has worked for anyone else though as a treatment for depression, so I will keep watching this thread, it's a really good question that no one has ever really answered for me either.
Yeah, I know what you mean. Personally I don't see any point in getting counseling, I don't see how talking about stuff would help, when I already talk to my partner about everything, and it doesn't help.
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Mind sharing how you did it? Drugs, therapy etc.?
For me it was actually going travelling, which is why I said it wasn't very conventional. I was absolutely dreading going away to the point where I would have quite easily not gone if it weren't for the financial repercussions. But I think the break in my daily routine of staying in bed doing nothing all day somehow sparked my old self. By the time i got back I had run out of medication, so I came off it somewhat accidentally, and was noticeably different (in a good way) according to others.
Other factors that helped were ending a toxic relationship and getting a new job in a new city, so basically a complete lifestyle change which forced me to push myself and break my old habits.
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Petulia
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Yeah, I know what you mean. Personally I don't see any point in getting counseling, I don't see how talking about stuff would help, when I already talk to my partner about everything, and it doesn't help.
It does put a lot less strain on your relationship and your family members/friends etc. I found that it can be really frustrating for other people to listen to this type of stuff even though they usually won't voice it, and I start to feel guilty for bringing down other people's moods. So your relationship with your partner/family is one thing that I found can definitely be improved by speaking to a counselor instead of your loved ones.
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Barbastelle
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Back to how you were BEFORE it started. To me, minor mood lifts are not even worth the effort.
I don't think it's something that ever truly leaves you. You can go on to live an amazing life afterwards, and yes it does get much, much better - you can be just like you were before. You will just need to become aware of the early symptoms so that you never relapse, and develop ways of reminding yourself that life (and in particular, your life!) is good. It's an uphill struggle and it isn't easy, but it does get better and you can do it!
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Anonymous #6
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Just over a year ago I lost all motivation to do anything, even basic stuff like showering and going to school. I didn't eat and would have to be constantly distracted otherwise I would just scream and cry, I left school for a few months before GCSE'S and just managed to get through them. I got into a really unhealthy habit of walking at least 10 miles a day until i was exhausted enough to get to sleep.
I tried counselling, group therapy, meds etc. and none of it made me feel better, people always said the same or the wrong things and the meds made me lethargic.
What worked for me was looking after myself physically before dealing with the mental aspect of depression. I began forcing myself to eat healthily, get dressed everyday and wash. Progressing on from this, one of the few things that helped was starting to swim a little and run. It occupied my mind, gave me something other than school to think about and you can't argue with endorphins!
When I was better physically I was at a point to start recovering mentally, it was the hardest thing I've done in my life and often I slipped back into destructive patterns and routines however, I thought logically and got out of it. I made productive routines for my day, planned things to look forward to, little things like buying a new book or going to the supermarket.
Now I would say I am 'recovered'. Moving to sixth form helped me and I accepted the world for it's imperfections. I am sure in the future I will get down again but having been through this ~1 year period i (cringe) feel so much stronger and like I can deal with it. Keep persevering. Time heals,
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Barbastelle
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Yeah, I know what you mean. Personally I don't see any point in getting counseling, I don't see how talking about stuff would help, when I already talk to my partner about everything, and it doesn't help.
I was like you - I didn't think that talking about it would help at all (I wasn't talking to anyone about it), but I was really surprised at how much better it made me feel. Just knowing that someone was listening to you who you didn't know so they weren't judging you and they weren't going to have this memory of you later (which in my opinion would be why it would be awkward talking about it with friends or family) was really supportive and made me feel a lot better (although I only actually had two sessions over two months due to lack of availability).
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Anonymous #7
#17
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Personally, my experience stemmed from years of underlying emotional abuse as well as slightly difficult situations.
My parents divorced when I was about 8, went through some legal issues with that, then a lot of it was loneliness following that. Then I went to a secondary school I didn't really like. I didn't really get along with many people. Every other secondary school I tried to get into rejected me. Then I finished year 11 with a very unproductive summer and got into a very good sixth form. However, even though I achieved my dream school, I started self-harming a month in after losing my old friends for a stupid argument, and I was unprepared for Year 12. Some reckless behaviour like constant arguments, aggression and unconsented outings happened. What remained of my family disapproved of me.
At the same time, I guess I had philosophical depression too.
I was contemplating suicide since I felt like a complete failure.
It took intervention on my mum's behalf to take me to an intense therapy workshop. It was a bit unorthodox - a group effort where every person has their own issues to deal with - but I've been once before and it was so lovely to return. The therapist that led the workshop, a graduate of Natural Sciences from Cambridge, told me that thoughts form crystal structures within the brain - it takes effort and long-term commitment to convince the habits of the brains that the crystals formed by negative thoughts have no use, instead, rewiring them with positivity.
That way, I can say today that I am on my way to curing depression.
It requires constant diligence as it means you have to force yourself to find a purpose in life, to find joy in little things so that you have the mental endurance to not get depressed by stressful situations (stressful because they can either be dislikeable or likeable, provided that you need to muster energy to go and do them and so put stress on your body). It's mind training to get the neurones in your brain firing with life.
Still, take anything that everyone says with a grain of salt. It is for you to find your own path.
For me, it took a lot of TED talks, a bit of a weird phase in my art, confessions to a few close friends, repeating Year 12, lots of walks in nice weather, and rebuilding the relationship with my family to become harmonious. Another thing was a busy week of work experience - something completely new - which helped get my work ethic back.
Good luck
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Anonymous #1
#18
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(Original post by Anonymous)
For me it was actually going travelling, which is why I said it wasn't very conventional. I was absolutely dreading going away to the point where I would have quite easily not gone if it weren't for the financial repercussions. But I think the break in my daily routine of staying in bed doing nothing all day somehow sparked my old self. By the time i got back I had run out of medication, so I came off it somewhat accidentally, and was noticeably different (in a good way) according to others.
Other factors that helped were ending a toxic relationship and getting a new job in a new city, so basically a complete lifestyle change which forced me to push myself and break my old habits.
I see, yeah, massive lifestyle change. Wish I could do something like that but it's not an option at the moment.

(Original post by Petulia)
It does put a lot less strain on your relationship and your family members/friends etc. I found that it can be really frustrating for other people to listen to this type of stuff even though they usually won't voice it, and I start to feel guilty for bringing down other people's moods. So your relationship with your partner/family is one thing that I found can definitely be improved by speaking to a counselor instead of your loved ones.
Makes sense. I don't think I'd be able to fully trust a counselor, though.

(Original post by Barbastelle)
I don't think it's something that ever truly leaves you. You can go on to live an amazing life afterwards, and yes it does get much, much better - you can be just like you were before. You will just need to become aware of the early symptoms so that you never relapse, and develop ways of reminding yourself that life (and in particular, your life!) is good. It's an uphill struggle and it isn't easy, but it does get better and you can do it!
Wish it would just get better already. It's been years to be honest...............
(Original post by Anonymous)
Just over a year ago I lost all motivation to do anything, even basic stuff like showering and going to school. I didn't eat and would have to be constantly distracted otherwise I would just scream and cry, I left school for a few months before GCSE'S and just managed to get through them. I got into a really unhealthy habit of walking at least 10 miles a day until i was exhausted enough to get to sleep.
I tried counselling, group therapy, meds etc. and none of it made me feel better, people always said the same or the wrong things and the meds made me lethargic.
What worked for me was looking after myself physically before dealing with the mental aspect of depression. I began forcing myself to eat healthily, get dressed everyday and wash. Progressing on from this, one of the few things that helped was starting to swim a little and run. It occupied my mind, gave me something other than school to think about and you can't argue with endorphins!
When I was better physically I was at a point to start recovering mentally, it was the hardest thing I've done in my life and often I slipped back into destructive patterns and routines however, I thought logically and got out of it. I made productive routines for my day, planned things to look forward to, little things like buying a new book or going to the supermarket.
Now I would say I am 'recovered'. Moving to sixth form helped me and I accepted the world for it's imperfections. I am sure in the future I will get down again but having been through this ~1 year period i (cringe) feel so much stronger and like I can deal with it. Keep persevering. Time heals,
Thanks for sharing your story!

(Original post by Anonymous)
Personally, my experience stemmed from years of underlying emotional abuse as well as slightly difficult situations.
My parents divorced when I was about 8, went through some legal issues with that, then a lot of it was loneliness following that. Then I went to a secondary school I didn't really like. I didn't really get along with many people. Every other secondary school I tried to get into rejected me. Then I finished year 11 with a very unproductive summer and got into a very good sixth form. However, even though I achieved my dream school, I started self-harming a month in after losing my old friends for a stupid argument, and I was unprepared for Year 12. Some reckless behaviour like constant arguments, aggression and unconsented outings happened. What remained of my family disapproved of me.
At the same time, I guess I had philosophical depression too.
I was contemplating suicide since I felt like a complete failure.
It took intervention on my mum's behalf to take me to an intense therapy workshop. It was a bit unorthodox - a group effort where every person has their own issues to deal with - but I've been once before and it was so lovely to return. The therapist that led the workshop, a graduate of Natural Sciences from Cambridge, told me that thoughts form crystal structures within the brain - it takes effort and long-term commitment to convince the habits of the brains that the crystals formed by negative thoughts have no use, instead, rewiring them with positivity.
That way, I can say today that I am on my way to curing depression.
It requires constant diligence as it means you have to force yourself to find a purpose in life, to find joy in little things so that you have the mental endurance to not get depressed by stressful situations (stressful because they can either be dislikeable or likeable, provided that you need to muster energy to go and do them and so put stress on your body). It's mind training to get the neurones in your brain firing with life.
Still, take anything that everyone says with a grain of salt. It is for you to find your own path.
For me, it took a lot of TED talks, a bit of a weird phase in my art, confessions to a few close friends, repeating Year 12, lots of walks in nice weather, and rebuilding the relationship with my family to become harmonious. Another thing was a busy week of work experience - something completely new - which helped get my work ethic back.
Good luck
Sounds like a really tough job :< glad you're on your way to recovery now
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Nirvana1989-1994
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At the start of the year, life just really got too much for me, and I felt I couldn't cope anymore. I even quit going to my counsellor because, I just didn't even want to leave the house, not to go to college, not to go anywhere. But, tbh, joining here made me feel a lot better in myself, as just talking to people just made life that bit more bearable. There are still some days where I feel terrible, where I feel I'm just going to relapse again, but, you've just got to keep going. I'm nowhere near 'cured', but I'm just taking one day at a time.
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Barbastelle
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Wish it would just get better already. It's been years to be honest...............
It will get better, but only if you let it. It's not going to go away if you just bury your head in the sand and wait for it to blow it over. You will need to do something about it - firstly come to terms with the fact that you are depressed, and that you have decided to do something about it. Set yourself manageable goals each day, so that you can see progress, which is an excellent motivator. Try to keep a diary as well, even if it seems pointless.
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