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    Hello TSR,

    I am in a bad situation currently,
    Here is a little about my background:

    I started my first year in university at September 2015, throughout the year I started getting homesick, anxious and depressed. I had poor attendance throughout the year and I failed my Summer exams and thus I was allowed to to a resit at September.

    During the Summer, my depression was significantly worse and I then failed my all my September resits.

    I never told my department anything and they decided to terminate me from my course. I was allowed to appeal against this decision. I then got a letter from my GP around the end of September which confirmed I had depression.

    I used this evidence in my appeal, In my appeal, I said I have changed my lifestyle around completely and I'm actively doing my best to combat this depression.

    Fast forward a month, and the decision to terminate me was revoked. But, I now have to wait a whole year and restart my studies at September 2017, and sit my first year as it was my first time, provided I prove I am fit to study.

    This whole month, I feel like a completely different person and my previous symptoms have virtually gone. I revisited my GP, and she confirmed that I am much better, and currently I am fit to resume my studies, provided I have a plan and seek regular counselling to avoid any re-occurances. I also have a GP letter which confirms this.

    On receipt of my appeal, they said I am allowed to ask for a review within 14 days of receiving the appeal.
    Now, I want to review this decision on the basis that I am not depressed currently, and I can resit my modules again this June so I can start year 2 at September 2017.
    I have passed my coursework, however I have 3 modules and I need to achieve roughly 55% in each of them to have to academic requirements to go to year 2.

    However there is a major sticking point, in my original appeal, I specifically said that "my only option is to retake the year". The board of examiners granted this request from my original appeal. But now, I am trying to say that I want to just do the Summer exams. I don't know how to word my letter to convince the university to review my appeal. Also I have failed by more than 30 credits and I have 3 modules. Also if it does get reviewed, it will be sent to the Appeals Panel rather than the Board of Examiners this time.

    I have 1 day to submit a letter requesting a review.

    I want your help TSR. My future depends on it.
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    Just explain in the letter exactly what you mean. I know it sounds like a very simple answer to s complex question, write the letter explaining the whole situation and then explain that as you are fit to study, and have already passed your coursework, you feel it would be most beneficial to just re-take
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    Also another detail,

    The University only accepts to review an appeal, on the condition of there being procedural irregularities or there is evidence which has not been fully considered from my original appeal.

    Also, the student unions said, normally at this stage new evidence will not be considered, and the likelihood of actually getting an appeal reviewed isn't very likely.
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    Also another note,

    There is no benefit for me to wait a year. In my eventual degree results, it will probably say that I have retook a year.

    If they don't accept my request, I am probably going to just going to quit this university and retake my maths a level, and also do a further maths a level, hopefully I'll get improved grades this time, and I will transfer to a better University.

    Now, would it be better to include some sort of indirect threat to leaving the university in my letter, in the hopes of it increasing my chances?
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    By the sounds of it it doesn't sound like you are going to get what you want. Work on a positive plan for the year and take some time to continue to work on your mental health so you can feel confident in 2017. And no, threats won't work.
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    i agree the threat wont work and youll have to repay some of your loan if you quit before the end of the university year. If it was me, id ask for a meeting with the head of department for your subject and explain that you feel a lot better and would rather retake your modules now to go into year two so you can gauge his reaction before bothering to formerly try to get a review
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    (Original post by Consigliere111)
    Also another note,

    There is no benefit for me to wait a year. In my eventual degree results, it will probably say that I have retook a year.

    If they don't accept my request, I am probably going to just going to quit this university and retake my maths a level, and also do a further maths a level, hopefully I'll get improved grades this time, and I will transfer to a better University.

    Now, would it be better to include some sort of indirect threat to leaving the university in my letter, in the hopes of it increasing my chances?
    Depends what uni it is. If it's one that struggles to keep up numbers (the kind of one that accepts everyone who applies etc) then yes. If they have a lot of people wanting to go there and could easily replace you , then no don't threaten to leave.
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    I have just recently received my provisional result for a module assessment component at Undergrad. The assessment was a presentation followed by a couple of questions at the end.

    ISSUE 1: the feedback mentions that my presentation was of a FIRST, however, mark returned is a 2.2. Is it just to drop one by two whole classifications from a FIRST to a 2.2?

    ISSUE 2: It was never communicated by the module lecturer/ convenor (the module lecturer & the examiner I had is the module convenor) that the questions would decrease the mark. Explicit reference was made by the convenor & the (lecturer) that the questions were there to push up the mark for the presentation and in no way to decrease the mark.

    So the cohorts' interpretation was that if one choose to withhold from answering a question or answered a question incorrectly the mark of the presentation would not actually decrease (what the lecturer actually said in a lecture).

    Therefore, the issue and main concern is the feedback explicitly indicates that the presentation is of a FIRST and that could be my mark - BUT decided to award mark on the questions and gave a 2.2! Is it just for someone in their right mind to decrease a students' mark from a FIRST to a 2.2 actually state that in the feedback? And base the mark on a 3/4 questions when the actual significant chunk of the assessment was the presentation not the questions.

    Someone please advice on what their thoughts are of this and what could be done.

    P.s I have already spoken to the marker/ convenor and they cannot be bothered by looking into it (the module convenor was my actual examiner/ marker).
 
 
 
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