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    We have currentlt just moved onto mitosis and, while I understand the mechanics of the process, there is one part I find quite confusing.
    Cells, for 90% of their time, are within the interphase. Does this statement only apply to cells which are aboit to undergo mitosis, or all of the mitotic cells in the body? For example if I were to obtain any mitotic cell i the body, would it definitely be engaged in either interphase, prophase, metaphase, anaphase or telophase? Or could it be operating in none of these distinct phases, onlt carrying out its specific function?
    Sorry its a bit long but I find I can only learn if i have a holistic understanding of the topic.
    Thanks to anyone who replies it's kuch appreciated!!
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    (Original post by BackLumbarJack)
    We have currentlt just moved onto mitosis and, while I understand the mechanics of the process, there is one part I find quite confusing.
    Cells, for 90% of their time, are within the interphase. Does this statement only apply to cells which are aboit to undergo mitosis, or all of the mitotic cells in the body? For example if I were to obtain any mitotic cell i the body, would it definitely be engaged in either interphase, prophase, metaphase, anaphase or telophase? Or could it be operating in none of these distinct phases, onlt carrying out its specific function?
    Sorry its a bit long but I find I can only learn if i have a holistic understanding of the topic.
    Thanks to anyone who replies it's kuch appreciated!!
    Okay so from what i remember, it does apply to all the mitotic cells. They are always in one stage or the other. If they're carrying out their normal functions, they are usually in interphase. So although interphase is for preparation of mitosis to take place, its also just when the cell is doing its normal activities. Interphase used to actully be called the resting period because thats when the cell is chilling out.

    Sorry if that doesnt make sense or i've repeated myself but i hope it helps. Feel free to ask more questions.
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    (Original post by BackLumbarJack)
    We have currentlt just moved onto mitosis and, while I understand the mechanics of the process, there is one part I find quite confusing.
    Cells, for 90% of their time, are within the interphase. Does this statement only apply to cells which are aboit to undergo mitosis, or all of the mitotic cells in the body? For example if I were to obtain any mitotic cell i the body, would it definitely be engaged in either interphase, prophase, metaphase, anaphase or telophase? Or could it be operating in none of these distinct phases, onlt carrying out its specific function?
    Sorry its a bit long but I find I can only learn if i have a holistic understanding of the topic.
    Thanks to anyone who replies it's kuch appreciated!!
    I don't really understand what you're asking, tbh. Cells are at any given time in a point in the 'cell cycle' - mitosis is one small part of this where the cell is actively dividing. Most of the time, the cell is not mitotically active (i.e. not dividing), but in an 'interphase' period of 'rest'. Some cells divide more regularly than others (e.g. gut microvilli). Is this what you're asking?
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    (Original post by DabThruALevels)
    Okay so from what i remember, it does apply to all the mitotic cells. They are always in one stage or the other. If they're carrying out their normal functions, they are usually in interphase. So although interphase is for preparation of mitosis to take place, its also just when the cell is doing its normal activities. Interphase used to actully be called the resting period because thats when the cell is chilling out.

    Sorry if that doesnt make sense or i've repeated myself but i hope it helps. Feel free to ask more questions.

    Ahh so interphase is not a part of mitosis directly, but is rather the constant phase in which all cells exist when they are not directly involved in mitosis?
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    (Original post by BackLumbarJack)
    Ahh so interphase is not a part of mitosis directly, but is rather the constant phase in which all cells exist when they are not directly involved in mitosis?
    Short answer: yes, interphase is when the cell is not dividing, its just doing its own thing and preparing everything for mitosis to take place.

    Long answer: we can split the cell cycle into three parts: Interphase (broken down into G1, S phase, and G2 - my teacher was rubbish at explaining this to me when i was in college so i dont wanna confuse u by going into it), Mitosis itself (Prophase, Metaphase, Anaphase, Telophase - make sure you deffo know these), and lastly Cytokinesis (seperating the cytoplasm). A lot of the time people assume interphase and cytokinesis is part of mitosis but they're just other parts of the cell cycle. (Although i always used to put cytokinesis as one of the phases in mitosis oops).

    Think of it this way: interphase is when youre studying/preparing for your exams (which takes up all ur time during the year) whereas mitosis is the actual exam (not so much time) and cytokinesis is when you get your results. So basically they all link together but theyre seperate things.

    Anyway i hope that example wasnt too confusing, i just came up with it now so it might not make as much sense as i hope it does. I hope you get it now
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    Oops I've pretty much forgotten everything I ever learnt about mitosis/meiosis!
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    Thanks that's a great explanation

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