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    Does anybody else find it rude when second generation Asian people speak in an Asian language? I mean they speak English just as well as anybody else and theyve lived here their whole lives, so why do they feel the need to speak to each other in languages other than English? (Especially on public transport!).
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    That isn't really anything to do with you. I am Indian, but don't speak any other language (bet that makes you happy.) People are free to speak what ever they want, there is no law stating you must speak English. If it anoys you, thats your problem. Why are you picking on Indians? What about all the Poles etc, they haven't even made an effort to learn the language. For your information, there is no language called 'Indian.'
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    (Original post by NW8_SW1_EC3)
    That isn't really anything to do with you. I am Indian, but don't speak any other language (bet that makes you happy.) People are free to speak what ever they want, there is no law stating you must speak English. If it anoys you, thats your problem. Why are you picking on Indians? What about all the Poles etc, they haven't even made an effort to learn the language. For your information, there is no language called 'Indian.'
    I wasn't sure how to categorise the language. What are you talking about the Poles have made no effort to learn English, I work in a hospital and i've never had to book a Polish person public transport and a translator at the cost of £40 an hour, then have them not turn up. I know there isn't a law against speaking another language, it just seems rude if you speak the native one just as well.
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    (Original post by Elipsis)
    Does anybody else find it rude when second generation Asian people speak in an Asian language? I mean they speak English just as well as anybody else and theyve lived here their whole lives, so why do they feel the need to speak to each other in languages other than English? (Especially on public transport!).
    I don't see how its rude, explain...:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Elipsis)
    I wasn't sure how to categorise the language. What are you talking about the Poles have made no effort to learn English, I work in a hospital and i've never had to book a Polish person public transport and a translator at the cost of £40 an hour, then have them not turn up. I know there isn't a law against speaking another language, it just seems rude if you speak the native one just as well.
    Why? They're not conversing with you or about you, they're talking amongst themselves. Unless you desire to eavesdrop then I don't see the problem. I personally speak to everyone in English except my parents and other Punjabi Indian people who's Punjabi is better than their English.
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    (Original post by S a n d h u)
    I don't see how its rude, explain...:rolleyes:
    Because it would be just as easy to speak in English, then everybody could understand what theyre saying. They would also not be distancing themselves from the rest of the world then complaining about how they arent accepted in society.
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    (Original post by Elipsis)
    I wasn't sure how to categorise the language. What are you talking about the Poles have made no effort to learn English, I work in a hospital and i've never had to book a Polish person public transport and a translator at the cost of £40 an hour, then have them not turn up. I know there isn't a law against speaking another language, it just seems rude if you speak the native one just as well.
    Ever stepped foot into London? You live in Letchworth, I live in London, there is a slight difference in the Polish population.
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    (Original post by Pav27)
    I personally speak to everyone in English except my parents and other Punjabi Indian people who's Punjabi is better than their English.
    That's fair enough. My point is that what's the point in being in England if you arent going to accept any part of our culture.
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    (Original post by NW8_SW1_EC3)
    Ever stepped foot into London? You live in Letchworth, I live in London, there is a slight difference in the Polish population.
    I actually live in Leeds atm we have a pretty big Polish population here.
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    I find it quite strange, but English is probably a second language to them. I don't see any harm in them practicising it, i know i'd do it if i could speak two languages. I've always assumed they do it so that it is always fresh in their minds. I'm already forgetting the 5 years of french i learnt, and i've only stopped speaking it for about 11 weeks. :p:
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    (Original post by Elipsis)
    Because it would be just as easy to speak in English, then everybody could understand what theyre saying. They would also not be distancing themselves from the rest of the world then complaining about how they arent accepted in society.
    I don't know any Indians/Asians who feel that way. I know Black people that feel like that though.
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    (Original post by LPK)
    I find it quite strange, but English is probably a second language to them. I don't see any harm in them practicising it, i know i'd do it if i could speak two languages. I've always assumed they do it so that it is always fresh in their minds. I'm already forgetting the 5 years of french i learnt, and i've only stopped speaking it for about 11 weeks. :p:
    I really dont mind if its peoples second language at all.
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    Well im Filipino, and me and my brothers, and my Filipino friends always follows the rule: if we got other friends around of different background, we dont speak filipino language. In public we lower our voices down. But those rules never have to be followed.

    But yeah its a bit awkward to be sitting in front of two people speaking a different language. It makes you a bit insecured. But then again if you think about it, its awkward for two people who has a common language speaking in another language. Example, lets say you go to france with your friend and both of you are English and you're in public, would you address him in french? I bet you wont.
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    (Original post by iCeCream)
    Well im Filipino, and me and my brothers, and my Filipino friends always follows the rule: if we got other friends around of different background, we dont speak filipino language. In public we lower our voices down. But those rules never have to be followed.

    But yeah its a bit awkward to be sitting in front of two people speaking a different language. It makes you a bit insecured. But then again if you think about it, its awkward for two people who has a common language speaking in another language. Example, lets say you go to france with your friend and both of you are English and you're in public, would you address him in french? I bet you wont.
    I'm not asking visitors here to speak in a language thats harder for them at all. I'm only refering to people who were born here and speak English as freely and easily as anybody else who lives here. I just think if they made the effort to not segregate themselves in this way it would definately improve relations between all groups of people.
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    I don't see why you can single out Indians.
    I know many Koreans/Japanese people who do that all the time...and sometimes it can get a bit annoying, but I understand why they do it!
    I find it easier to speak Gujarati to some friends, Hindi to others and even French. Sometimes English isn't the easiest form of communication even though you are living in England.
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    Elipsis surely you are refering to a TINY proportion of people? I don't know any who are fully able to speak to English as their first language but speak a different one. I know two Greek girls who get very shy to speak to Greek infront of others who are not Greek.
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    *The OP has obviously not been to a multi-cultural city like Melbourne where practically everyone speaks in some EUROPEAN language, even though they know how to speak Australian perfectly well...*

    EDIT: Or Canberra, you wouldn't believe how many Croatians live here.
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    (Original post by sugar_cane)
    I don't see why you can single out Indians.
    I know many Koreans/Japanese people who do that all the time...and sometimes it can get a bit annoying, but I understand why they do it!
    I find it easier to speak Gujarati to some friends, Hindi to others and even French. Sometimes English isn't the easiest form of communication even though you are living in England.
    I didnt mean to single out Indians in particular sorry, I couldnt phrase the name of the thread properly. Maybe i'm being a bit unreasonable expecting English people to speak English in England...
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    (Original post by sugar_cane)
    I don't see why you can single out Indians.
    I know many Koreans/Japanese people who do that all the time...and sometimes it can get a bit annoying, but I understand why they do it!
    I find it easier to speak Gujarati to some friends, Hindi to others and even French. Sometimes English isn't the easiest form of communication even though you are living in England.
    Sugar_Cane steps in her with linguistic skills :p: *Jealous face*
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    (Original post by NW8_SW1_EC3)
    Elipsis surely you are refering to a TINY proportion of people? I don't know any who are fully able to speak to English as their first language but speak a different one. I know two Greek girls who get very shy to speak to Greek infront of others who are not Greek.
    Nah its almost every time I get on public transport. Its especially worse at school times when literally whole schools of Asian/black children filter out gibbering away when I know for a fact they were born here.
 
 
 
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