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    Anyone else homeschooling their A Levels? how do you stay focused? how do you keep on target and motivated??
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    Out of interest, would you mind saying why you chose not to go to College or sixth-form to do your A levels? I have a preconception that it must be awfully isolating, and not an ideal preparation for living at University with a diverse range of students, but I've always wanted to ask an actually home-schooled student.
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    well i went to sixth form for a year, but decided to change subjects and didnt want to redo with the year below. i still keep in touch with my friends from college though
    and see them a lot so its not too isolating. i just struggle with the keeping myself on
    target part of it.
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    There are a lot of misconceptions about 'homeschooling' which is the American way of saying it. In the UK, it is known as home education.
    I home educated my grandson whom I've had custody of since birth. He never attended school. He was well socialised, and although I'm aware during those years - he is 17 now and in his 2nd year at College, there were children whom I came across who were very much isolated, but they tended to be children who were home educated because of religious reasons. I also met a few families whose children were literally.
    Home education doesn't suit everyone, and neither does the school system.
    He is well-liked at college, gets on with his peers and tutors alike and has had no problems fitting in.
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    (Original post by Seamus123)
    There are a lot of misconceptions about 'homeschooling' which is the American way of saying it. In the UK, it is known as home education.
    I home educated my grandson whom I've had custody of since birth. He never attended school. He was well socialised, and although I'm aware during those years - he is 17 now and in his 2nd year at College, there were children whom I came across who were very much isolated, but they tended to be children who were home educated because of religious reasons. I also met a few families whose children were literally.
    Home education doesn't suit everyone, and neither does the school system.
    He is well-liked at college, gets on with his peers and tutors alike and has had no problems fitting in.
    Interesting. Not wishing to pry, but were there specific reasons which led you to home educate your grandson: it doesn't seem like something you'd just decide on a whim? It sounds like it's worked in your case, so that's good to hear. One usually only hears of the freaks and god squads.
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    Well, the freaks and God squads make better television, don't they? He was born with heart issues and other health related problems, late development, delayed speech and failure to thrive. So I took him - it was that or Care.
    Social Services didn't want me to work or study, his needs were too high. So I had to drop out of uni and after a lot of thought, decided that home education was in his best interests. Very hard work as his learning was slow. When he got to secondary age, I gave him the choice of going to school or continue with home ed and he chose home ed.
    he started college last year and I went back to uni last year to do the degree I started 17 years ago. I'm 68 now and in my second year.
    My 7 children went to school and they did just fine, but I very quickly realised that one size doesn't fit all.
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    (Original post by Seamus123)
    Well, the freaks and God squads make better television, don't they?
    Quite.
    (Original post by Seamus123)
    He was born with heart issues and other health related problems, late development, delayed speech and failure to thrive. So I took him - it was that or Care.
    Social Services didn't want me to work or study, his needs were too high. So I had to drop out of uni and after a lot of thought, decided that home education was in his best interests. Very hard work as his learning was slow. When he got to secondary age, I gave him the choice of going to school or continue with home ed and he chose home ed.
    he started college last year and I went back to uni last year to do the degree I started 17 years ago. I'm 68 now and in my second year.
    My 7 children went to school and they did just fine, but I very quickly realised that one size doesn't fit all.
    What a selfless thing of you to do. And such a success story - from an unpromising start he's now at college and obviously doing well, and you've been able to finish your degree as well.

    I really hope those who instantly scoff at home education read your post and see that in some circumstances it is absolutely the right thing to do, but it only works with selfless and dedicated parents or guardians like you.
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    Thank you. That is very much appreciated.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    Out of interest, would you mind saying why you chose not to go to College or sixth-form to do your A levels? I have a preconception that it must be awfully isolating, and not an ideal preparation for living at University with a diverse range of students, but I've always wanted to ask an actually home-schooled student.
    It is, of course, completely different for every homeschooler, just like every normally educated person has a different life- but home schoolers, I find, often have better friends. We are not forced into socialisation with groups of people who bully us, nor do we only have to socialise with people our own age. To me, every person I meet and talk to, be they 10 or 70, is a friend, and I feel all the more enriched for the time to make these strong friendships- often whilst doing things I love like going to groups for different activities/hobbies. Sometimes it has felt lonely as you don't always see your friends every day, but usually you can choose the balance of work/social time you want, as opposed to at school where you're stuck around people all day and have no private time. So yeah, school isn't the only place in the world to make friends.
    I believe my home ed. has helped me become a more independent, motivated and enthusiastic learner, which is exactly what unis are looking for.
 
 
 

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