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    Hello all!

    I graduated with a 2:1 in Psychology from Uni of Manchester in 2013. After that I took some time as a kind of a gap year and tended bar for a year. Which turned into 3 years. In that time I've done 6 months of volunteering, 13 months (and counting) as an honorary assistant psychologist and in May, quit my job in a restaurant and became a bank mental healthcare support worker.

    Since becoming an honorary AP I've been getting interviews for paid AP/Band 4 mental health jobs - although I've only had about 5 and I've had an absolute stack of rejections. I get horrendously nervous in interviews and feel like this screws me over and the rejections have started to shake my confidence.

    Rather than blindly keep trying the same thing over and over I decided to do an MSc in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology. I've been offered my place, but my excitement to start was short lived as the reality of taking a massive loan to pay for it dawned on me.

    I think the biggest fear comes from not being guaranteed any improvement in career prospects at the end of it. I obviously really want to study it and freshen up/broaden my knowledge of mental illness, and I feel like it'll make me more confident in what I'm talking about going into interviews, and obviously helps with the DClinPsy application.

    Big question today though is: For those of you who've done a Masters in Psychology, how have you felt like it's affected your job prospects/employability?

    Thank you!
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    I know it maybe out of topic but how
    Did you find it doing your psych degree?.. I'm going to do it next year but I've always been told there's no proper career you can go into straight after :/


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    Why don't you do something to work on your nerves instead?

    If you're doing the masters to get a job then that's silly. Doing a masters won't make you less nervous during interviews.

    If you're doing a masters because you actually want to and think you will enjoy it then go for it.
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    (Original post by Maddi22)
    I know it maybe out of topic but how
    Did you find it doing your psych degree?.. I'm going to do it next year but I've always been told there's no proper career you can go into straight after :/


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    I really enjoyed my degree personally, but it is a struggle to get your foot on the career ladder :/ If you're dedicated and thick skinned it is possible but I won't lie that it is hard. I'm qualified for a Band 4 or 5 job and I'm doing a Band 2 job.
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    (Original post by Da Di Doo)
    Why don't you do something to work on your nerves instead?

    If you're doing the masters to get a job then that's silly. Doing a masters won't make you less nervous during interviews.

    If you're doing a masters because you actually want to and think you will enjoy it then go for it.
    I'm working on my nerves with a counsellor, with anti-anxiety medication and my supervisor (the consultant clin psyc) as I have a problem with anxiety. I am hoping that one benefit of having more specialist knowledge going into interview will help to reduce that.

    Like I said in my original post, I'm doing the masters because I genuinely want to study it, but with this massive debt I have to think practically about career prospects. If it has very little impact on employability then it'd be more practical to spend the next year trying to get extra experience, but I'm curious as to how people in the know found their Masters affected their employability.
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    (Original post by qqpeow)
    I really enjoyed my degree personally, but it is a struggle to get your foot on the career ladder :/ If you're dedicated and thick skinned it is possible but I won't lie that it is hard. I'm qualified for a Band 4 or 5 job and I'm doing a Band 2 job.
    Hmmm that's true.. it is difficult!!

    Good luck though


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    (Original post by Maddi22)
    Hmmm that's true.. it is difficult!!

    Good luck though


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    Thank you! If you're really serious about it and you're willing to put the work in I'd say go for it. I adore my subject. If you have anymore questions feel free to message me.
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    I am currently studying my MSc in Clinical Psychology, originally with the intention to do the DclinPsych but decided a few weeks in it's not for me and am now applying for research PhDs in clinical psychology area.

    I think it's good to make you decide if it's the right path, not sure if it really helps with employability as it's more a research based degree than applied therapy etc.
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    Thank you, that's helpful would I be able to ask where you're studying your MSc?

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    (Original post by qqpeow)
    Thank you, that's helpful would I be able to ask where you're studying your MSc?

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    I have an MRes psychology from uni of Manchester which I found incredibly dull and tedious. I did get a PhD offer but I wished I would have saved my £6000. The boringness made me slightly realise that psychology wasn't not for me.
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    (Original post by qqpeow)
    I really enjoyed my degree personally, but it is a struggle to get your foot on the career ladder :/ If you're dedicated and thick skinned it is possible but I won't lie that it is hard. I'm qualified for a Band 4 or 5 job and I'm doing a Band 2 job.
    Who is getting the higher band jobs? Is it experience or qualification that is enabling them?
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    I know experience is important but I'm wondering if qualification has much impact. It seems important in the band 5 jobs.
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    (Original post by qqpeow)
    Thank you! If you're really serious about it and you're willing to put the work in I'd say go for it. I adore my subject. If you have anymore questions feel free to message me.
    Thank you! X


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    I graduated in 2010 and had worked as a bank support worker part time for 2 years. I applied for a lot of jobs (AP, STAR and so on) and didn't get a single interview. I continued as a support worker for a further year and then did an MSc in Forensic Psychology. I applied for a variety of jobs and landed 2-3 interviews in for what were essentially glorified support worker roles - I was rejected for all of these. Then I finally got offered two AP interviews, the first one, a band 4 post, I did pretty terribly at. The following Monday I had a band 5 interview and got the job.

    Did the MSc help? Probably not. I was much less nervous in the second interview, but looking back on it now, it was still pretty terrible. I genuinely have no idea how I got the job. At the end of the day, the Psychologists are looking for someone they can trust to work independently and get things done - it's more about a general air of competence than any specific knowledge or skills.

    Which questions are you finding it the hardest to answer?
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    Hey, thank you for your advice! What do you feel it was that took you from no interviews to getting some?

    Question-wise, I'm not really sure. I feel like I turn into a stuttering mess in interviews but a lot of interviewers have told me I interviewed well and was likeable, there was just another candidate with closer experience to the job (however obviously I'm stuck in that catch-22 of being unable to get anymore experience without being given experience).
    I think I struggle to properly articulate my experience and reflect on it fully. The way I feel (even with my two current jobs) is that I can do the job really well but I can't explain that I can do the job, which is frustrating!

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