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    (Original post by shiny)
    What maths is involved?
    Calculus
    Graph Theory
    Group Theory
    Linear and non-linear algebra
    Fourier Transforms
    Vector Calculus
    Trig
    ...
    ...
    ...

    I could go on for ages, most mathematical concepts eventually find some application in science.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Calculus
    Graph Theory
    Group Theory
    Linear and non-linear algebra
    Fourier Transforms
    Vector Calculus
    Trig
    ...
    ...
    ...

    I could go on for ages, most mathematical concepts eventually find some application in science.
    What are Fourier transforms? I have to do that this year coming.
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    (Original post by Nylex)
    What are Fourier transforms? I have to do that this year coming.
    It's basically a method that splits a waveform into components called sinuoids (or something like that) which when summed equal the total waveform. Spectroscopic techniques (such as infrared and Nuclear magnetic resonance) use these transforms to add together various bits of information collected by the spectrometer and create a spectrum (which is the total waveform) - it's much more accurate than non-FT techniques. I'm afraid I'm a bit ropey on the actual derivations!
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    (Original post by Nylex)
    What are Fourier transforms? I have to do that this year coming.
    Have you done Fourier Series?
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    (Original post by shiny)
    Have you done Fourier Series?
    Nope, we do that this year as well.
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    (Original post by Nylex)
    Nope, I assume we do those this year as well. All I know is we do Fourier *something* .
    Oh, can't explain Fourier Transforms that way then

    P.S. Since you are a physicist remember this, the FT of a Gaussian is another Gaussian You'll probably need that for Quantum Mechanics next year
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    (Original post by shiny)
    Oh, can't explain Fourier Transforms that way then

    P.S. Since you are a physicist remember this, the FT of a Gaussian is another Gaussian You'll probably need that for Quantum Mechanics next year
    Don't worry, I looked up both Fourier Series and Fourier Transforms on Mathworld. They look complicated :eek:. Oh boy, I don't even know what a Gaussian is!
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    (Original post by Nylex)
    Don't worry, I looked up both Fourier Series and Fourier Transforms on Mathworld. They look complicated :eek:. Oh boy, I don't even know what a Gaussian is!
    Gaussian Distribution = Normal Distribution
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    (Original post by shiny)
    Gaussian Distribution = Normal Distribution
    Oh ok, I hated Statistics! Thanks.
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    (Original post by Nylex)
    Oh ok, I hated Statistics! Thanks.
    No wonder you hate quantum stuff! All that probability!
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    (Original post by Nylex)
    Oh ok, I hated Statistics! Thanks.
    statistics suckssssss
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    (Original post by tammypotato)
    statistics suckssssss
    Indeed .

    (Original post by shiny)
    No wonder you hate quantum stuff! All that probability!
    Exactly .
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    Hey Nylex, do you need to know about Polar Co-ords for first year physics? just not sure whether to bother with that P4 topic, or move onto P5 once I've done 2nd order differentials.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Hoofbeat)
    Hey Nylex, do you need to know about Polar Co-ords for first year physics? just not sure whether to bother with that P4 topic, or move onto P5 once I've done 2nd order differentials.

    Thanks
    In my course we didn't, check with elpaw about Oxford though .
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Calculus
    Graph Theory
    Group Theory
    Linear and non-linear algebra
    Fourier Transforms
    Vector Calculus
    Trig
    ...
    ...
    ...

    I could go on for ages, most mathematical concepts eventually find some application in science.
    what's the calculus stuff on? like reaction rates? Im only A level chemist
 
 
 
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