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    why does phosphorus have a 3+ charge instead of a 3- charge. I think it is something to do with a reduced octect? But i'm still confused.
    Thanks.
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    Sorry you've not had any responses about this. Are you sure you've posted in the right place? Here's a link to our subject forum which should help get you more responses if you post there.


    Just quoting in Fox Corner so she can move the thread if needed :wizard:
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    (Original post by IGCSETANK)
    why does phosphorus have a 3+ charge instead of a 3- charge. I think it is something to do with a reduced octect? But i'm still confused.
    Thanks.
    Because it has lost three electrons?

    Usually it would like to gain three and form a 3- ion, but it all depends on what it is attached to.
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    I suspect you really mean something that might be called a "3+ valence", since it's unlikely you'll find actual P trications floating around!

    P is fairly central in the periodic table, and really quite electropositive. It's often found bound to elements that are more electronegative than itself (PCl3, P(OCH3)3, P(C6H5)3, etc).

    Try comparison with nitrogen - both NCl3 and Li3N exist.
 
 
 
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