How do you get a caloric deficit???

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username1292215
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More calroies out than in seems so impossible like if I only eat 1000 calories how can I burn more than 1000 calories? I read that 1 hour of strength training only burns 200 calories...
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Greg Jackson
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You burn calories just by being alive, calculate your TDEE then eat at a deficit from that

http://www.freedieting.com/tools/calorie_calculator.htm
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BurstingBubbles
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(Original post by SuperHuman98)
More calroies out than in seems so impossible like if I only eat 1000 calories how can I burn more than 1000 calories? I read that 1 hour of strength training only burns 200 calories...
(Original post by Greg Jackson)
You burn calories just by being alive, calculate your TDEE then eat at a deficit from that

http://www.freedieting.com/tools/calorie_calculator.htm
As above. The average human burns out 60 calories an hour just by existing iirc, all the energy required to pump the heart, digest food etc. Plus things like walking and moving around burns calories
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Rakas21
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(Original post by SuperHuman98)
More calroies out than in seems so impossible like if I only eat 1000 calories how can I burn more than 1000 calories? I read that 1 hour of strength training only burns 200 calories...
If you only ate 1000 calories on a consistent basis then you would be seriously malnourished. Assuming your an average male then you'll require 2300 per day just to maintain an average weight.
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mrhedgehog
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You clearly don't eat 1000 calories a day. Track your macronutrients rather than calories and then you decrease carbs to reach a calorie deficit.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by mrhedgehog)
You clearly don't eat 1000 calories a day. Track your macronutrients rather than calories and then you decrease carbs to reach a calorie deficit.
I'm sorry but this is scientifically wrong. Macronutrients are irrelevant. It's energy which is relevant to weight loss or gain.

Decreasing carbohydrate intake is one way to lose weight, but so is decreasing fat intake or even, horror of horrors, decreasing excessive protein intake. The obsession with 'macros' is not helpful for the majority of people.

OP: you make a good point here, that it is essentially impossible to lose weight by exercise alone. As well as using far less energy than you think, there is plenty of evidence that strenuous exercise actually increases energy consumption as people get hungrier and feel they 'deserve' to eat more. Moderate exercise is great for overall energy expenditure (and even more important once you've reached your goal weight for keeping your weight within sensible limits) but reducing your energy intake through diet is key to successful weight loss. 1,000kCal is very low - we'd really need to assess a food diary to calculate whether indeed you are eating 1000kCal to help you properly.

Source: Biology NatSci and dietetics degree.

http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/loseweigh...ng-weight.aspx
https://www.bda.uk.com/foodfacts/Want2LoseWeight.pdf
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mrhedgehog
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I'm sorry but this is scientifically wrong. Macronutrients are irrelevant. It's energy which is relevant to weight loss or gain.

Decreasing carbohydrate intake is one way to lose weight, but so is decreasing fat intake or even, horror of horrors, excessive protein intake. The obsession with 'macros' is not helpful for the majority of people.

Source: Biology NatSci and dietetics degree.
Well I assumed fats were quite 'low' anyway. Yes decreasing fats and keeping carbs high may work.
Macros are way better and more accurate than counting total calorie intake.

Source: Medicine degree and years of bodybuilding and powerlifting experience.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by mrhedgehog)
Well I assumed fats were quite 'low' anyway. Yes decreasing fats and keeping carbs high may work.
Macros are way better and more accurate than counting total calorie intake.

Source: Medicine degree and years of bodybuilding and powerlifting experience.
It'd be great if you could provide some sources for the claim that macros are "better and more accurate than counting total calorie intake", so that the OP can assess the best evidence base on which to make a decision.
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mrhedgehog
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(Original post by Reality Check)
It'd be great if you could provide some sources for the claim that macros are "better and more accurate than counting total calorie intake", so that the OP can assess the best evidence base on which to make a decision.
Your idea would work if OP is a regular person who wants to lose fat. But counting macros is more superior if OP is strength training and wants to lose fat but maintain strength/muscle.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/content/...nutrition.html

http://vitals.lifehacker.com/count-m...die-1706873465

Overall it depends on OP's goals.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by mrhedgehog)
Your idea would work if OP is a regular person who wants to lose fat. But counting macros is more superior if OP is strength training and wants to lose fat but maintain strength/muscle.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/content/...nutrition.html

http://vitals.lifehacker.com/count-m...die-1706873465

Overall it depends on OP's goals.
Thanks. The OP makes no mention of strength training; he is only asking how you create a calorie deficit, and your post tells them to 'track macronutrients and decrease carbs' which is not the current advice. Thank you for the sources but they are rather unreliable, as you know as a Cambridge medic... Please note that I'm not targeting you personally, but I think providing the most up-to-date, evidenced and referenced advice is important for the OP and others who might be reading the thread.

The OP can decide on the evidence and make a judgement from there.
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mrhedgehog
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Thanks. The OP makes no mention of strength training, and your post tells them to 'track macronutrients and decrease carbs' which is not the current advice. Thank you for the sources but they are rather unreliable, as you know as a Cambridge medic... Please note that I'm not targeting you personally, but I think providing the most up-to-date, evidenced and referenced advice is important for the OP and others who might be reading the thread.

The OP can decide on the evidence and make a judgement from there.
But I read 'strength training' in OP's post so I assumed it's a possibility.
My sources might not be the best because I am going off experience rather than evidence.
Also once again I reiterate that your sources are for losing weight overall for a regular person and I totally agree with those methods.

Also thanks for stalking my profile but bringing up the fact that I am a Cambridge medic has nothing to do with this.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by mrhedgehog)
Also thanks for stalking my profile but bringing up the fact that I am a Cambridge medic has nothing to do with this.
Yes, you're right. It could have been left at 'medic'. Apologies.
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username1292215
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mrhedgehog realitycheck I do strength training , and the 1000 calories was just a scenario
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Reality Check
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(Original post by SuperHuman98)
mrhedgehog realitycheck I do strength training , and the 1000 calories was just a scenario
Thanks for clarifying this. In the scenario you paint, 1000kCal a day with strength training really isn't a good combination - you wouldn't have enough energy to train in any way decently, and the combination of severe energy restriction and microtrauma to the muscles is only going to lead in one direction - catabolism.

Where mrhedgehog is correct is in suggesting that the macronutrient balance can play a part of dieting in certain circumstances. Severe energy restriction could be one of these, insofar as maintaining a relatively high protein intake during times of severe calorie restriction has been shown to help preserve LBM (International Journal of Obesity (2007) 31, 743–750 & 2007 Nature Publishing Group). However, weight training would increase protein turnover further and further aggravate the situation.
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