Russell Group university lecturers on 'sports direct' contracts

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Joinedup
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The Grauniad reports that university teaching is blighted by precarious employment.
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...-lecturers-pay
Academics teaching or doing research in British universities will typically have spent years earning doctorates or other qualifications, yet more than half of them – 53% – manage on some form of insecure, non-permanent contract. They range from short-term contracts that typically elapse within nine months, to those paid by the hour to give classes or mark essays and exams.
University managers typically argue that such flexible contracts allow young academics to gain valuable experience. But in interviews with the Guardian, academics have disputed that argument from their own experience, including:


https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...nough-for-rent
• A 44-year-old politics lecturer working at three different institutions at once but still earning only just over £6,000 a year, relying on benefits to top up his poverty pay.

• A 32-year-old linguistics lecturer who has experienced “serious mental health issues” and says “unstable work without a network of colleagues and without any security is proving really difficult”.

• A 49-year-old English lecturer who says: “I earn such a pathetic amount. I feel quite humiliated.”

If you have ever thought you'd received a lecture that seemed like it had been cobbled together at the last minute, bear in mind that for one of the lecturers speaking to the graun...
The hourly-paid lecturing rate includes payment for half an hour preparation and half an hour marking for each hour of face-to-face teaching.
Current & prospective students, does it make you wonder where the £9000 tuition fee is really going if the people doing the tuition are frequently getting so little of it?
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Joinedup)
The Grauniad reports that university teaching is blighted by precarious employment.
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...-lecturers-pay


University managers typically argue that such flexible contracts allow young academics to gain valuable experience. But in interviews with the Guardian, academics have disputed that argument from their own experience, including:


https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...nough-for-rent
• A 44-year-old politics lecturer working at three different institutions at once but still earning only just over £6,000 a year, relying on benefits to top up his poverty pay.

• A 32-year-old linguistics lecturer who has experienced “serious mental health issues” and says “unstable work without a network of colleagues and without any security is proving really difficult”.

• A 49-year-old English lecturer who says: “I earn such a pathetic amount. I feel quite humiliated.”

If you have ever thought you'd received a lecture that seemed like it had been cobbled together at the last minute, bear in mind that for one of the lecturers speaking to the graun...


Current & prospective students, does it make you wonder where the £9000 tuition fee is really going if the people doing the tuition are frequently getting so little of it?
The Guardian as usual misses the point.

These people are not being paid at a poor hourly rate. They don't have enough hours work.

The universities' argument is directed to people building a career but the older lecturers interviewed are essentially people who, for one reason or another, have failed at an academic career. They will have, no doubt, applied for hundreds of permanent posts, but nobody wants them. These are not people squeezed out by ageism or blocked by a recruitment freeze. They are people who have been passed over, time and again.
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Joinedup
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
The Guardian as usual misses the point.

These people are not being paid at a poor hourly rate. They don't have enough hours work.

The universities' argument is directed to people building a career but the older lecturers interviewed are essentially people who, for one reason or another, have failed at an academic career. They will have, no doubt, applied for hundreds of permanent posts, but nobody wants them. These are not people squeezed out by ageism or blocked by a recruitment freeze. They are people who have been passed over, time and again.
the interviewees did seem similar. However the graun says the younger ones are too terrified of retribution to talk :unsure:
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J Papi
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I think that the mistaken assumption, as nulli tertius said, would be to assume that these people would be employed at all in other circumstances if they had permanent contracts or higher salaries. Come to think of it, two of my four class teachers seem to be on part-time contracts (one of them also teaches at a neighbouring uni), but I haven't, anecdotally, seen it influence their enthusiasm or involvement in classes.

Edit: This figure also presumably includes PhD students, who only view teaching as a topup to whatever salary/funds they have to cover their living costs. In that case, I don't really have an issue - it's a temporary solution and the part-time aspect allows them to fit in classes with their research.
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#ChaosKass
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Oh, cry me a river. If they were sensible they would have gone and got a job with a good private company in industry rather than letting themselves wither away in the "safe space" of academia. No sympathy whatsoever.
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