Why do you want to study law? What motivated you to want to study it?

Watch this thread
Amina_Z
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Hi,

I finished college in 2016 and instead of applying straight to uni I took a gap year because I decided I don't want to study primary education and decided I would take a year out to work.
I have finally decided to study law and apply for 2017 but I'm struggling with my personal statement.
I want to study law because it is interesting, i want to make a difference and it doesn't hurt that the money is good. But i cant think of more...

This is a question to those who have applied to do Law or are already doing Law ...

Ps. I didn't do law as an A - Level.
1
reply
Ray04
Badges: 10
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
Shadow a lawyer/work in a law firm first. You need to get a proper idea of what a lawyer's work consists of before committing. I've applied for law 2017 and already have got experience work shadowing at law firms.

Have you truly considered what you want to do? It's ok to do a gap year, just make full use of it (ie. work in a law firm if your really interested, explore other areas of interest etc).

You're young i assume, like many of us, but you seem a little uncertain (from the way you phrased your question). Most of us applying for law will know to some degree why we want to do it and the sheer amount of work/studying involved. I think the best way to address this uncertainty is not just to ask for and listen to advice but to try it yourself.

(Im doing law at A level, my mother's a solicitor and my aunt's a District Judge in Manchester so i have a background in legal work and know whats involved)
1
reply
TK_23
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
OvergrownMoose
0
reply
999tigger
Badges: 19
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
It doesnt matter that you didnt do A level law.
Bear in mind you are asking to be let on a course to be an academic and that's different from practcing law.
Your answers dont sound very developed yet so do some research to understand what studying law involves and what appeals to you about it. Work experience is not essential.

The best answers imo sound genuine and offer a good insight into your potential as a student. They help you stand out compared against the many predictable ones.

If you want ideas of the basics of possible reasons then google is your friend. You can use those answers to help you think about different ways you can approach it. You cna also get your PS chcked one by a PS reviewer on TSR. G luck.
0
reply
lawx1998
Badges: 4
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 5 years ago
#5
But many people will study Law because they're interested in the academic side of it, not just because they want to work in a law firm later on.

Not everyone who studies Law becomes a lawyer.


(Original post by Ray04)
Shadow a lawyer/work in a law firm first. You need to get a proper idea of what a lawyer's work consists of before committing. I've applied for law 2017 and already have got experience work shadowing at law firms.

Have you truly considered what you want to do? It's ok to do a gap year, just make full use of it (ie. work in a law firm if your really interested, explore other areas of interest etc).

You're young i assume, like many of us, but you seem a little uncertain (from the way you phrased your question). Most of us applying for law will know to some degree why we want to do it and the sheer amount of work/studying involved. I think the best way to address this uncertainty is not just to ask for and listen to advice but to try it yourself.

(Im doing law at A level, my mother's a solicitor and my aunt's a District Judge in Manchester so i have a background in legal work and know whats involved)
0
reply
Jasy
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
I'm a Solicitor and I recall that my initial attraction to 'law' was due to being a competitive person. This competitive side of me drew my attention to the adversarial side of law (basically anything involving one side vs. another - so from criminal to anything litigation based).
0
reply
username967462
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
Not having studied A-level Law will not disadvantage you in any way whatsoever because top unis (LSE, Oxbridge etc) class it as a "soft subject". It has very little resemblance and benefit to the law course at uni.

Also many applicants make the grave fallacy in thinking that Law is a vocational course. It's a deeply academic and theoretical degree. It's nice that you might want to be a lawyer but's that not what the admissions staff really care about. In fact, 50% of qualified lawyers today have not studied the LLB. To be lawyer, you can sit the any first degree, convert on the one year GDL and then do the LPC or BPTC (which is the professional skills course).

Your PS should emphasise your academic curiosity for Law. So express your views about topical legal issues which you have read about. Or write a two or three sentences about some preliminary reading you've done. This will demonstrate your interest, enthusiasm and commitment.
0
reply
username967462
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#8
Report 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by Amina_Z)
i want to make a difference and it doesn't hurt that the money is good.
I do want to add that initially when I set out studying Law, one of my reasons was that I wanted to make a difference. That was when I was naive and idealistic. The reality is that most lawyers do not contribute to landmark rulings. Also if you really want to help people, then bear in mind areas like criminal law and other areas or publically funded work often pays very little. The criminal bar is seeing a serious brain drain due to legal aid cute. The majority of top candidates are setting their sights on commercial firms.

Even then, the competition for graduate positions is cut throat. It's becoming increasingly difficult to apply for training contracts or pupillage and there is a gross oversupply of law students.

You'll only tend to earn mega bucks if you are working in a large commercial firm or at the commercial bar. Of course there are exceptions.

I'm not trying to put you off, but it's good to be informed.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How did your Edexcel A-level Economics Paper 1 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (61)
15.76%
The paper was reasonable (190)
49.1%
Not feeling great about that exam... (97)
25.06%
It was TERRIBLE (39)
10.08%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise