Anyone a sick chemist?

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KyleH123
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#1
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#1
Struggling with some of these questions.

Don't know the proper terms to find the proper information on them

Love ya all
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ceryshughes17
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c) Calcium bromide is ionic as is non-metal and metal. Bromine is two non-metal hence why it is bonded covalently.

e) Potassium is only +1 charge meaning there are less electrons within the sea of delocalised the forces between ions within the metallic layers are weaker.

2a) All are induce dipole-dipole meaning an instantaneous dipole can occur at any moment within a bromine molecule, causing it to induce other dipoles in neighbouring molecules, causing the dipoles to be attracted to eachother forming intermolecular bonds. (a.k.a london forces)

2b) There is no hydrogen bonding here. Both have permanent dipoles within the molecules as in HBr, Br is highly electro-ve and in NF3, the F is also. Causes electrons to be more attracted to the areas of high electro-vity, forming a dipole. Postive end of one dipole attracted to negative end on other dipole creating intermolecular forces.

2c) This has h. bonding(H bonds only occur between H and O/F/N. Due to the lone pair of electrons on nitrogen are able to form a nitrogen bond with the H atom on a different ammonia molecule. (Ammonia also is polar, same as H2O)

D

2) V soluble, same reasons as NaCl.

5) High - strong metallic bonds

6) none unless molten or in aqueous sol - ionic bonds, same again as NaCl.

8) Water is high due to H bonds needing a lot of energy to break.

9) Good conductor as electrons in 'sea' are able to flow thus carry a charge


Everything Ive said is written off the top of my head so I cant guarantee is 100% - everything in here would have been in my textbook so you could find in a decent A Level Chem textbook (my spec is OCR)
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KyleH123
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#3
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#3
(Original post by ceryshughes17)
c) Calcium bromide is ionic as is non-metal and metal. Bromine is two non-metal hence why it is bonded covalently.

e) Potassium is only +1 charge meaning there are less electrons within the sea of delocalised the forces between ions within the metallic layers are weaker.

2a) All are induce dipole-dipole meaning an instantaneous dipole can occur at any moment within a bromine molecule, causing it to induce other dipoles in neighbouring molecules, causing the dipoles to be attracted to eachother forming intermolecular bonds. (a.k.a london forces)

2b) There is no hydrogen bonding here. Both have permanent dipoles within the molecules as in HBr, Br is highly electro-ve and in NF3, the F is also. Causes electrons to be more attracted to the areas of high electro-vity, forming a dipole. Postive end of one dipole attracted to negative end on other dipole creating intermolecular forces.

2c) This has h. bonding(H bonds only occur between H and O/F/N. Due to the lone pair of electrons on nitrogen are able to form a nitrogen bond with the H atom on a different ammonia molecule. (Ammonia also is polar, same as H2O)

D

2) V soluble, same reasons as NaCl.

5) High - strong metallic bonds

6) none unless molten or in aqueous sol - ionic bonds, same again as NaCl.

8) Water is high due to H bonds needing a lot of energy to break.

9) Good conductor as electrons in 'sea' are able to flow thus carry a charge


Everything Ive said is written off the top of my head so I cant guarantee is 100% - everything in here would have been in my textbook so you could find in a decent A Level Chem textbook (my spec is OCR)
Thank you so much; honestly this gave me a base to research from.
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KyleH123
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#4
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(Original post by ceryshughes17)
c) Calcium bromide is ionic as is non-metal and metal. Bromine is two non-metal hence why it is bonded covalently.

e) Potassium is only +1 charge meaning there are less electrons within the sea of delocalised the forces between ions within the metallic layers are weaker.

2a) All are induce dipole-dipole meaning an instantaneous dipole can occur at any moment within a bromine molecule, causing it to induce other dipoles in neighbouring molecules, causing the dipoles to be attracted to eachother forming intermolecular bonds. (a.k.a london forces)

2b) There is no hydrogen bonding here. Both have permanent dipoles within the molecules as in HBr, Br is highly electro-ve and in NF3, the F is also. Causes electrons to be more attracted to the areas of high electro-vity, forming a dipole. Postive end of one dipole attracted to negative end on other dipole creating intermolecular forces.

2c) This has h. bonding(H bonds only occur between H and O/F/N. Due to the lone pair of electrons on nitrogen are able to form a nitrogen bond with the H atom on a different ammonia molecule. (Ammonia also is polar, same as H2O)

D

2) V soluble, same reasons as NaCl.

5) High - strong metallic bonds

6) none unless molten or in aqueous sol - ionic bonds, same again as NaCl.

8) Water is high due to H bonds needing a lot of energy to break.

9) Good conductor as electrons in 'sea' are able to flow thus carry a charge


Everything Ive said is written off the top of my head so I cant guarantee is 100% - everything in here would have been in my textbook so you could find in a decent A Level Chem textbook (my spec is OCR)
yeah I didn't grab a chemistry book from the college library today, damn. :-(
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FlowerFaerie087
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www.chemguide.co.uk is a really useful resource!
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username2637499
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CheeseIsVeg
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CheeseIsVeg
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#7
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I am so sick :puke:
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username2637499
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#8
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(Original post by CheeseIsVeg)
I am so sick :puke:
Not that way
OP needs help :lol:
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