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    Hi everyone, I've applied for Zoology and have received offers, so I'm not worried about getting into uni without Chemistry. However, I'm extremely worried about not being able to do well at uni without sufficient knowledge in Chemistry.

    I gave up applying for Law to go for the subject I'm truly passionate about, but now I'm starting to doubt if it was a wise decision! Would it still be possible for me to graduate with a first in Zoology/Biology given my lack of Chemistry?:erm:

    I'd also like to clarify that while Zoology usually contains a bit less chemistry than general Biology, there's a 90% chance I'll be going to Bristol. Their Zoology course is quite similar to Biology and they share an identical first year as well. It's also easy to switch between the two courses.

    Some background info: I'm doing the IB and have Biology, Geography, English at HL and Maths, Economics, Chinese at SL.

    It'd be amazing to hear from someone who's doing a Biology degree without having studied Chemistry previously. Is it manageable or would you advise against doing so? I'd appreciate any advice! Thanks!!!
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    I'm studying bioveterinary at Lincoln, but the first year is identical for all life sciences- including Biology and Zoology. I didn't do chemistry a-level, and in fact most people didn't, a lot didn't even do a-levels. What are the modules like? This semester we do biochemistry, and next biochemistry and metabolism. It's the module most people struggle with so they provide a lot of support, but to be honest if the entry requirements don't ask for chemistry you should be fine. I bought a few cheap them books to go over basic things but gcse chem and then the biochem you cover in biology a-level should be more than enough, so I really wouldn't worry! Good luck
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    (Original post by loganley)
    I'm studying bioveterinary at Lincoln, but the first year is identical for all life sciences- including Biology and Zoology. I didn't do chemistry a-level, and in fact most people didn't, a lot didn't even do a-levels. What are the modules like? This semester we do biochemistry, and next biochemistry and metabolism. It's the module most people struggle with so they provide a lot of support, but to be honest if the entry requirements don't ask for chemistry you should be fine. I bought a few cheap them books to go over basic things but gcse chem and then the biochem you cover in biology a-level should be more than enough, so I really wouldn't worry! Good luck
    Thanks very much for your reply! I'm glad to hear that I'm not alone

    Only thing is I'm studying in Hong Kong, so I haven't done gcse chem. I only did one very basic year of chemistry at school three years ago, from which I barely remember anything! Haha
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    (Original post by JessicaApple)
    Thanks very much for your reply! I'm glad to hear that I'm not alone

    Only thing is I'm studying in Hong Kong, so I haven't done gcse chem. I only did one very basic year of chemistry at school three years ago, from which I barely remember anything! Haha
    Honestly don't worry, you will be fine! The first year will be a catch up on basics exactly for this reason; everyone has learnt different things. So the people who did chem might breeze through that module while the others just have to do a little more work.
    If you're seriously worried I would get a basic cheap chem book and go over moles and electron configuration (the summer before uni- not while you have actual exams to worry about!) everything else will probably just be carbohydrates and proteins.
    Really don't let it scare you off, not many people do chem and you definitely don't need it (if the uni don't ask for it)
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    (Original post by loganley)
    Honestly don't worry, you will be fine! The first year will be a catch up on basics exactly for this reason; everyone has learnt different things. So the people who did chem might breeze through that module while the others just have to do a little more work.
    If you're seriously worried I would get a basic cheap chem book and go over moles and electron configuration (the summer before uni- not while you have actual exams to worry about!) everything else will probably just be carbohydrates and proteins.
    Really don't let it scare you off, not many people do chem and you definitely don't need it (if the uni don't ask for it)
    Thanks very much again for the reassurance!
    I think I'll read my old chemistry textbook once I've finished IB just so I know the basics

    But the way, although you study Bioveterinary instead... What are your thoughts on the graduate prospects of Zoology?
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    (Original post by JessicaApple)
    Thanks very much again for the reassurance!
    I think I'll read my old chemistry textbook once I've finished IB just so I know the basics

    But the way, although you study Bioveterinary instead... What are your thoughts on the graduate prospects of Zoology?
    I never looked into zoology so I'm not really sure what the prospects are, but I imagine if you had relevant work experience and placements you could go into most areas; animal management, conservation work, lab work, a masters in a more specific area, research work, environmental work, working within animal nutrition etc. Do you have any idea what sort of thing you'd like to do? Apparently with bioveterinary most people go on to work in labs (with pretty much any life science degree you can apparently do lab work) or aim to do postgrad vet med, personally I want to do a masters in behaviour (specifically interested in dogs rather than wild animals etc) where have you applied to?
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    (Original post by loganley)
    I never looked into zoology so I'm not really sure what the prospects are, but I imagine if you had relevant work experience and placements you could go into most areas; animal management, conservation work, lab work, a masters in a more specific area, research work, environmental work, working within animal nutrition etc. Do you have any idea what sort of thing you'd like to do? Apparently with bioveterinary most people go on to work in labs (with pretty much any life science degree you can apparently do lab work) or aim to do postgrad vet med, personally I want to do a masters in behaviour (specifically interested in dogs rather than wild animals etc) where have you applied to?
    I'm not completely sure what I'd like to do at this moment, but I've considered conservation work, ecological consultancy, wildlife trusts, environmental organisations, etc. I've just heard it can be quite challenging to land those jobs due to huge competition.
    I'm also a bit worried about the pay being too low since I have to pay ultra expensive tuition fees, being classified as an international student.

    I've applied to Bristol, Manchester, Sheffield, and Leeds. Well, I guess there's Oxford too but I've been rejected so...

    Good luck with your master's!
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    (Original post by JessicaApple)
    I'm not completely sure what I'd like to do at this moment, but I've considered conservation work, ecological consultancy, wildlife trusts, environmental organisations, etc. I've just heard it can be quite challenging to land those jobs due to huge competition.
    I'm also a bit worried about the pay being too low since I have to pay ultra expensive tuition fees, being classified as an international student.

    I've applied to Bristol, Manchester, Sheffield, and Leeds. Well, I guess there's Oxford too but I've been rejected so...

    Good luck with your master's!
    most jobs will be competitive unfortunately, you just have to try and do extra things to help you be a good candidate; placements, societies, volunteering, jobs etc! And although fees leave a lot of debt, try not to let it stress you. It's not seen as "bad debt" by banks so won't effect your ability to get a mortgage etc.
    To be quite honest unless you're doing a very specific degree such as medicine, dentistry or vet med, you'll be in the same boat in terms of what possible job prospects there'll be in future and will they pay well etc. You just have to pick a degree that you'll enjoy and is also hopefully a field you'd like to work in, and along the way you'll find placement opportunities, get job ideas etc!
    Those are all great unis, good luck with your decisions and results! you'll love it!
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    (Original post by loganley)
    most jobs will be competitive unfortunately, you just have to try and do extra things to help you be a good candidate; placements, societies, volunteering, jobs etc! And although fees leave a lot of debt, try not to let it stress you. It's not seen as "bad debt" by banks so won't effect your ability to get a mortgage etc.
    To be quite honest unless you're doing a very specific degree such as medicine, dentistry or vet med, you'll be in the same boat in terms of what possible job prospects there'll be in future and will they pay well etc. You just have to pick a degree that you'll enjoy and is also hopefully a field you'd like to work in, and along the way you'll find placement opportunities, get job ideas etc!
    Those are all great unis, good luck with your decisions and results! you'll love it!
    Thanks for the advice again I'll difinitely try my very best to gain as much experience as I can to improve my chances.

    However, even with higher tuition fees, I'm not allowed student loans because I'm not classified as a home student.
    That's despite being a British citizen! All because I haven't been living in the UK for the past three years...
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    I'm in the final year of my Biology degree now and I only have Chemistry up to AS (and I didn't understand any of it!). I never found it to be a problem. We had some Biochemistry modules and some of my friends said it was just a repeat of Chemistry A Level for them, but the lecturers explained all of it so I wasn't at a disadvantage. In the end I had similar results to my friends with Chemistry A Level so it doesn't mean you'll automatically do worse because you don't have it!

    Good luck and don't worry about it, you'll be fine
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    (Original post by Firefly13)
    I'm in the final year of my Biology degree now and I only have Chemistry up to AS (and I didn't understand any of it!). I never found it to be a problem. We had some Biochemistry modules and some of my friends said it was just a repeat of Chemistry A Level for them, but the lecturers explained all of it so I wasn't at a disadvantage. In the end I had similar results to my friends with Chemistry A Level so it doesn't mean you'll automatically do worse because you don't have it!

    Good luck and don't worry about it, you'll be fine
    Thanks for your reply! Hopefully, there will be less biochemistry in Zoology

    You had it up to AS, though I didn't even have it up to GCSE level
    I'm sure you had an understanding of basic chemical ideas. I literally know almost nothing apart from what's covered in the Biology syllabus haha... Even then I rely on memorising what I don't understand!
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    (Original post by JessicaApple)
    Thanks for your reply! Hopefully, there will be less biochemistry in Zoology

    You had it up to AS, though I didn't even have it up to GCSE level
    I'm sure you had an understanding of basic chemical ideas. I literally know almost nothing apart from what's covered in the Biology syllabus haha... Even then I rely on memorising what I don't understand!
    Haha, true! Most of what we covered was similar to what we did in A Level Biology, apart from one or two things about chemical bonding (but hopefully in Zoology you won't even have that!) if that makes you feel any better!

    My advice to you is to not worry about it, I'm sure you won't have a problem and that you will be able to learn any of the Chemistry without a problem (you can clearly manage it in Biology so it's not that you don't know anything!). If you are worried then having a quick look on the BBC Bitesized website for Chemistry GCSE to get an overview of some of the basic ideas over the summer before you start your course.
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    (Original post by Firefly13)
    Haha, true! Most of what we covered was similar to what we did in A Level Biology, apart from one or two things about chemical bonding (but hopefully in Zoology you won't even have that!) if that makes you feel any better!

    My advice to you is to not worry about it, I'm sure you won't have a problem and that you will be able to learn any of the Chemistry without a problem (you can clearly manage it in Biology so it's not that you don't know anything!). If you are worried then having a quick look on the BBC Bitesized website for Chemistry GCSE to get an overview of some of the basic ideas over the summer before you start your course.
    Thanks again and wow that's exactly what I've been doing! I've taken a look at bitesize Chemistry GCSE and it seems manageable with enough effort and time
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    In short, yes. I didn't have a chemistry A level but managed my molecular biology degree just fine and I now spend my days predicting the chemical structures of novel organic compounds.

    I suspect your first year module will cover structures of macro molecules, major pathways (citric acid pathway, photosynthesis) and labs on basic biochemical assays. You can either embrace it and aim to do well or do what I've seen many zoologists do: bluff their way through it. After that it should be possible to pick modules than largely avoid biochemistry.
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    (Original post by Quantex)
    In short, yes. I didn't have a chemistry A level but managed my molecular biology degree just fine and I now spend my days predicting the chemical structures of novel organic compounds.

    I suspect your first year module will cover structures of macro molecules, major pathways (citric acid pathway, photosynthesis) and labs on basic biochemical assays. You can either embrace it and aim to do well or do what I've seen many zoologists do: bluff their way through it. After that it should be possible to pick modules than largely avoid biochemistry.
    A molecular biology degree without chemistry? Now THAT'S impressive!

    The major pathways you mentioned are precisely the only parts of the Biology syllabus I actually "hate."

    I guess I'll have to try my very best in year one! The modules I'm interested in are probably the least chemical ones anyway so hopefully I'll be able to avoid biochemistry afterwards.
 
 
 
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