could do with some advice?

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Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
everyone around me thinks i have bipolar. however since all of them do not have psychiatry degrees i take what they say with a pinch of salt.

basically my MH is pretty ****. i can be so high and everything is heightened and with that comes my really really bad anger and irritability and inability to sleep or function properly. then i can get really sad and i know that's equally bad. plus my psychosis is bad at either end and i get really bad.

i'm struggling at the minute and i have just left the service i was going to since they were not in anyway helpful and they knew that.

but i'm not good and there is no decent MH support in the nhs?

what should i do?
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qu0y
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People opinions are just that, opinions. I would advise you to go talk to your GP about it and follow their guidance. If they dont suit you, keep looking, there are other GPs and MH practices with different therapeuts. Just dont give up for having a couple of bad experiences. Never give up on yourself. There are no instant or definite solutions. If you want instant fixes for mood, music, socialising (with people that make you feel good), exercise and food are the best I know that work with me. Give yourself a break, everyone has problems, but you have what it takes to make yourself feel better, from what I see you are seeking to change that, thats a great start find what makes you laugh.
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Airmed
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Unless you have the money for private, I would suggest returning to your GP and see about being assessed by a psychiatrist. It's good that you take your friends' 'diagnosis' with a pinch of salt, as such things should only be diagnosed by trained professionals.

In general, MH support in the NHS is iffy, but that's thanks to the cuts.
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Kindred
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(Original post by Anonymous)
everyone around me thinks i have bipolar. however since all of them do not have psychiatry degrees i take what they say with a pinch of salt.

basically my MH is pretty ****. i can be so high and everything is heightened and with that comes my really really bad anger and irritability and inability to sleep or function properly. then i can get really sad and i know that's equally bad. plus my psychosis is bad at either end and i get really bad.

i'm struggling at the minute and i have just left the service i was going to since they were not in anyway helpful and they knew that.

but i'm not good and there is no decent MH support in the nhs?

what should i do?
Unfortionately unless you can pay for private or have insurance NHS is basically your only option. It can take some pushing to get taken seriously sometimes and there can be long waits, but if you make your issues clear and don't give up you should get the help yu need. You might be able to talk to a mh charity like mind.org or sane for advice too.

My general advice is to see if you have anything diagnosable so you know a bit better what it wrong and to look into getting therapy. There are also charities focused on things like work or living etc which may or may not apply to you.

You can check out mind.org and sane.org in thte meantime for some info and advice and you could consider counselling if you think it may help.
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~Tara~
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There are lots of mental health problems which cause irritability anger and highs and lows..not simply bipolar. The NHS has its difficulties, some of which is funding related but private and public therapists go through very similar training. You're not necessarily getting better treatments or better diagnosis because you're paying out your ear for it. There's only one route to psychiatrist in the UK.

Diagnosis in mental health is not an exact science, it relies on you being able to present or describe your symptoms well (a large flaw in the system because we all use unique language for our experiences and people can be very guarded and not show their worst mental state to dr) and then the doc interpreting those symptoms against conditions which overlap so closely sometimes. Mood changes can be related to bipolar or borderline personality or schizophrenia or PTSD or dissociative disorder etc etc. Irritability can be high stress. Anger can be any of the ones I mentioned above. Hyperactivity/hyperarousal falls under many conditions too. It's about your history, how your symptoms present and how you describe them.

There's a difference between seeing things and a particular form of dissociation (I'm not aware of how to tell that difference as a therapist because I'm not clinically trained to that level, but there's a difference). You can experience schizo-type episodes and not be schizophrenic. It's complex and is why very few people can officially diagnose in their job. I can suggest someone sees a GP, but I can't say they have depression etc even if it sounds and looks very like it
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Anonymous #2
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sounds more like manic depression which is extreme highs and extreme lows but as you said dont take my opinion as gospel either as im not a professional.

the best thing to do is to talk to your GP and ask about counciling or medication and if they wont listen go to your walk in centre (hospital) and tell them the situation and say your doctor wont help you and you cant take it anymore. lie if you have to and tell them youll kill yourself if you cant get anyone to speak to you or give you some help
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~Tara~
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There are plenty of good staff in nhs but sometimes you have to fight the conveyor belt system that tries to quick fix you. I've been with my clinical psych for nearly 2 years and they are top notch. Kind, compassionate, extremely knowledgeable in helping me manage my mental health and learning safe ways to approach my dissociative disorder. I have multiple dx but try not to focus too much on all the letters and clubs I belong to! you can have dual dx or co-morbidity. But they don't have to be full blown. Like I have PTSD and DID, but I have traits of borderline and schizo-type episodes. Just them finding a new name for a bunch of behaviours, I guess. Borderline traits covers most of the ways I tried to cope with the trauma: self harm, risk taking, suicidal. And I'm in eating disorder remission

Don't get me wrong, some nhs stuff has been pants, but I've learnt it's partly because I could never be honest. In my case my DID meant I was in high functioning mode. I needed to appear okay, even when I was begging for help.

Anyway rambles. My point is, forget the media hype and try it out. There are very caring individuals within the system.
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~Tara~
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(Original post by Anonymous)
sounds more like manic depression which is extreme highs and extreme lows but as you said dont take my opinion as gospel either as im not a professional.

the best thing to do is to talk to your GP and ask about counciling or medication and if they wont listen go to your walk in centre (hospital) and tell them the situation and say your doctor wont help you and you cant take it anymore. lie if you have to and tell them youll kill yourself if you cant get anyone to speak to you or give you some help
Manic depression is the old name for bipolar disorder. Threatening suicide is definitely NOT the way to go. Not if you want to be taken seriously in future, if you want to avoid being labelled manipulative. You'll also have wasted the money and time of a team of emergency medicine staff and mental health crisis workers. If you genuinely feel suicidal, you should absolutely reach out to these people. That's what they are there for. But to waste 1000s of £s in holding up a bed, wages etc to try and force an outcome that likely won't happen anyway or risks a mental health label being attached to you which doesn't really belong to you??!

You can be persistent in seeking assessment and treatment in other ways. The best way is to understand what you want help with. List the symptoms causing you problems. Be honest about your personal history and have some idea about what treatment you want - therapy? Meds? Etc
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by ~Tara~)
Manic depression is the old name for bipolar disorder. Threatening suicide is definitely NOT the way to go. Not if you want to be taken seriously in future, if you want to avoid being labelled manipulative.

You can be persistent in seeking assessment and treatment in other ways. The best way is to understand what you want help with. List the symptoms causing you problems. Be honest about your personal history and have some idea about what treatment you want - therapy? Meds? Etc
i meant more saying to them he feels suicidal and needs help to combat it not actually threatening to commit suicide the second hes turned away. i agree it is a former name but there are types of bipolar with manic episodes known is hypermania which my doctor has said would be better described as manic depressive rather than bipolar which is more of a general term these days
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~Tara~
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(Original post by Anonymous)
i meant more saying to them he feels suicidal and needs help to combat it not actually threatening to commit suicide the second hes turned away. i agree it is a former name but there are types of bipolar with manic episodes known is hypermania which my doctor has said would be better described as manic depressive rather than bipolar which is more of a general term these days
It was the "lie if you have to, to make people listen" I was responding to.

I don't think bipolar has really changed in definition. The change was largely imposed to remove the association to clinical depression. Bipolar has individual differences in sufferers but I wouldn't say it was a broad spectrum illness. I mean if the analogy helped you to understand your stuff better against all the social myths and over emphasis on mood change - ignoring the risk taking etc that also comes alongside, then that's all that matters
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by ~Tara~)
It was the "lie if you have to, to make people listen" I was responding to.

I don't think bipolar has really changed in definition. The change was largely imposed to remove the association to clinical depression. Bipolar has individual differences in sufferers but I wouldn't say it was a broad spectrum illness. I mean if the analogy helped you to understand your stuff better against all the social myths and over emphasis on mood change - ignoring the risk taking etc that also comes alongside, then that's all that matters
thanks for the definition its nice to learn something new, thanks for taking the time to politely correct me (i hope that didnt come off as sarcastic im being sincere! its hard to convey tone over a text comment)
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Little Popcorns
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(Original post by Anonymous)
everyone around me thinks i have bipolar. however since all of them do not have psychiatry degrees i take what they say with a pinch of salt.

basically my MH is pretty ****. i can be so high and everything is heightened and with that comes my really really bad anger and irritability and inability to sleep or function properly. then i can get really sad and i know that's equally bad. plus my psychosis is bad at either end and i get really bad.

i'm struggling at the minute and i have just left the service i was going to since they were not in anyway helpful and they knew that.

but i'm not good and there is no decent MH support in the nhs?

what should i do?
Go back to your GP and discuss everything and be honest about the extent of things!

Best of luck :hugs:
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Anonymous #3
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Hey I'm happy you really want to seek help, it's about knowing you need help which is the first step. it's a really scary experience but I know you can do it! Good luck <3 Remember if you tell someone and they don't really understand/beleive you, find someone else hwo will - you deserve to be listened to and you are valid okay

Also, I know everyone here is talking about bipolar - has anyone thought of schizoaffective? I'm not a doctor so I can't diagnose but perhaps it is something you could look up. It includes psychotic symptoms and symptoms of a mood disorder - there are two types of it, one being the bipolar type, which means that you experience mania and depressive symptoms alongside psychotic/dissociative symptons(i'm not a doctor i might be wrong, it's from what I've been told myself from a doctor). I just thought I'd mention as it is fairly unkown and can be disregarded (in my experience).
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~Tara~
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I'd honestly avoid looking it up because most illnesses on the DSM overlap on a number of points. It takes a trained professional and sometimes a lengthy assessment process to get the right diagnosis. Better to go get assessed than worry yourself unnecessarily with scary sounding mental illnesses
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