Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am going to try to apply to Cambridge NatSci (that's a lot of "to"s ) and it said that you might be able to take physics first year if you are doing "Further Maths (mechanics)" when in fact I am only doing it up to P5. At the Trinity open day, they gave a very good impression of kindness, so maybe I would be able to take physics without having done physics A-level.

    I wanted to take physics AS, but I can't arrange the practical exam... Any thoughts? Thnx!
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    It's inadvisable to do Cambridge physics without reaching A-level standard first (the jump from A-level to Cam first year is quite big in itself). You could always self-teach yourself the syllabus without doing the exams, but it might be better to choose another NatSci first year option (Materials Science or Geology say).
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Squishy)
    (the jump from A-level to Cam first year is quite big in itself).
    Bleh, not really, I think the jump to double phys and maths in the second year is probably bigger.

    I would agree that it is inadvisable though unless you're really keen and can swim fast .

    Alaric.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Alaric)
    Bleh, not really, I think the jump to double phys and maths in the second year is probably bigger.
    Ahh, glad to hear it.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    What A-levels are you doing Wagamuffin?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    ATM I am doing Maths and FurtherM, French, Russian, Biology, Chemistry. I just realised I meant to say I am doing maths up to M5 not P5. I am pretty keen on physics, but the A level appeears a little too centered on engineering (correct me if I am wrong). For the moment I just want to know if it is possible I will worry about sink or swim after I get in Thnx guys!
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I think it will be OK. Just learn some mechanics in your own time and read a textbook or something
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I hope you don't mind me hijacking the thread slightly (it's still related), but does any one know if quantitative maths for biologists (or what ever it is called) is compulsory when doing Biological Natsci?

    By the way it sounds like you are doing enough A levels to grasp just about any subject!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    if you do natsci you MUST DO A MATHS COURSE. The elementary maths course is for scientists (mostly biologists) who didnt do any A level or AS maths. If you want to avoid doing too much maths then you pick quantitative biology as your maths course. If you want to do more maths than that, then they welcome you onto the maths a or b courses, although you should keep in mind that stuff taught on those courses may be completely useless unless you do physics. It just depends how much you like maths.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am assuming your school is offering Advancing Physics (sponsered by the Institute of Electrical Engineers...).

    I would recommend contacting local colleges and seeing if you can pay to use the labs at lunchtimes, or failing that just borrow someone's practical notes and find some books on experimental technique. Is your school not willing to help?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Let's put it this way; my school is French! -----> Very little personal attention. Argh I am kicking myself sooo badly for not taking Physics - it fitted PERFECTLY in my timetable; but I was too angry because if being denied History (which I love!!!) and so I never realised till Xmas!

    Hipocrit - blush I am just lucky; my weird life has resulted in my being tri-lingual so I get 2 "free" A-levels! - hijaking approved and permitted. You are forced to choose one of 3 maths courses. I was told at a Trinity open day the quantitative biology IS for people who are competent in maths (maths A-level I suppose), but the "pure" maths courses offered aren't for sissies so if you find that more fun I think it is worth trying out!

    Oh and just so you know I think when you "label" yourself as a "biological" NatScientist, you aren't limiting yourself to anything AT ALL, they will still let you major in Physics for example, no questions asked. (I am undecided between Chem and Biochem, so I am in between a physical and biological NatScientist :confused: )
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Wagamuffin)
    I was told at a Trinity open day the quantitative biology IS for people who are competent in maths (maths A-level I suppose), but the "pure" maths courses offered aren't for sissies so if you find that more fun I think it is worth trying out!
    There are 4 maths courses available in IA natsci. Maths A and B lead to the same exam and are primarily designed for the physical scientists; most of the stuff you learn is very useful in phys, chem etc later on. B has slightly more material covered than A, but you can manage either on single A-level maths if you work hard, and with further maths they're actually quite straightforward (sleep through the Michaelmas lectures...)

    The maths courses for biologists are Quantitative Biology (which is mostly statistical stuff I think) which is for people who've got A-level maths, and Elementary Maths for Biologists, which is for people who don't have A-level (this is what willla2 mentioned).

    (Original post by Wagamuffin)
    Oh and just so you know I think when you "label" yourself as a "biological" NatScientist, you aren't limiting yourself to anything AT ALL, they will still let you major in Physics for example, no questions asked. (I am undecided between Chem and Biochem, so I am in between a physical and biological NatScientist :confused: )
    Indeed, there's definitely no need to label yourself. I did Physics, Chem, Evolution + Behaviour and Maths B for IA, and never really knew what to say when people asked me whether I'm a physical or bio natsci. But to specialize in Physics later, you'd definitely need to do it as a IA choice. And I would recommend avoiding it if you haven't done it at A-level.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by christ's-boy)
    The maths courses for biologists are Quantitative Biology (which is mostly statistical stuff I think)
    Yup, quite a lot of stats. Little bit of calculus (we got as far as solving 2nd order non-linear differential equations, which feels impressive when you hate maths as much as I do), some population modelling, competition stuff... that's about it. I loathed it. As did almost everybody else doing it.

    Yeah, they only recommend you 'label' yourself physical or biological so they have an idea of which interviewers to assign to you.

    As for physics... Be warned, the physicists I know (excluding christ's-boy, of whose prowess in physics I've no idea but who probably sailed through it ) all, almost without exception, found first-year physics really tough. Two of them began the course determined to specialise in physics and will be biologists next year! I'm sure it's do-able, but if people with A level physics found it hard... I think you might be climbing a rather steep hill. I'm a biologist though so don't take my word for it. Take christ's-boy's
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    Yup, quite a lot of stats. Little bit of calculus (we got as far as solving 2nd order non-linear differential equations, which feels impressive when you hate maths as much as I do), some population modelling, competition stuff... that's about it. I loathed it. As did almost everybody else doing it.
    My girlfriend did a first year stats module and a few extra maths lessons here and there during her E.S. degree...

    Any differential equations were handed over to me right away!

    Why do you need to do that stuff? In the real world you would just get a colleague to do maths for you and a mathematician who needs to know some biology would come to you...

    You can't expect everyone to be wonderful at everything (unless they want to become a doctor! )
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Wagamuffin)
    ATM I am doing Maths and FurtherM, French, Russian, Biology, Chemistry.
    You are a masochist man! Why do that all stuff?

    You didn't need to, surely...?!

    I needed 4 subjects so I took four. I could quite easily have got another few A's if I wanted but that'd have been too much like hard work for me! :rolleyes:

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    As for physics... Be warned, the physicists I know (excluding christ's-boy, of whose prowess in physics I've no idea but who probably sailed through it ) all, almost without exception, found first-year physics really tough. Two of them began the course determined to specialise in physics and will be biologists next year! I'm sure it's do-able, but if people with A level physics found it hard... I think you might be climbing a rather steep hill. I'm a biologist though so don't take my word for it. Take christ's-boy's
    Gah nope, didn't enjoy a single minute of the physics really Ended out with a 2.2 in the module, which pulled me down to a 2.1 overall. I'm running off to do HPS! Neither physical nor bio (did someone say drop-out? )
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    My school kinda forces me to do french, and I still had to take sciences cos I don't want to study languages I finish at 6 PM usually :mad:
 
 
 
Poll
Who is most responsible for your success at university

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.