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stevesturdy
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Hi Guys,

Are UK university degrees equivalent to US university degrees? I ask because my long term ambition is to work in America, but their heavily dependent on university degrees. Any ideas? I don't want to spend years of hard work and money to find out once completed it's completely different and wouldn't be considered in the USA.

Thanks in advance,
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Yaboi
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No.
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stevesturdy
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(Original post by Yaboi)
No.
What is the difference, and why would it not be recognised?
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Sabertooth
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US undergrad is 4 years vs the English 3. You'd also be expected to study other areas in the US.

Might be worth looking into whether your university does a study-abroad program where you could spend a semester in the US.

But, to be blunt, it is very difficult for a British person to move to the US. I would recommend studying hard to get a 1st at a well-respected university and then try to get sponsored for a work visa by a US business.
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dragonkeeper999
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(Original post by stevesturdy)
Hi Guys,

Are UK university degrees equivalent to US university degrees? I ask because my long term ambition is to work in America, but their heavily dependent on university degrees. Any ideas? I don't want to spend years of hard work and money to find out once completed it's completely different and wouldn't be considered in the USA.

Thanks in advance,
I would have thought so - the only issue I can see is that UK degrees are three rather than four years, but since many US university accept A levels for credits this implies that the first year at a US college covers stuff UK students study in sixth form (high school). Also, most UK universities make you pick your subject from day one rather than the rather broad liberal arts colleges in the US where you can study all kinds of random stuff and not declare your major for a couple of years, which means that you should have just as deep a knowledge of your major subject from a UK degree as a US one despite it taking one year less.

However, if your plan is to work in the USA after graduation it would make much more sense to study there for university - you will have access to good industry contacts and internships in American companies, have more relevant careers advice from the university, and get to know which areas of the country you would be interested in.

Are you a UK citizen/ US citizen/ other international student? It generally works out cheaper to study in your home country because of government loans/ grants etc. (big shout out to the UK government for scrapping grants lol...), but if you are a US citizen interested in studying in the UK as a study abroad opportunity, bear in mind that you can probably do a semester/ year abroad anyway as part of some American degree courses
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stevesturdy
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(Original post by Sabertooth)
US undergrad is 4 years vs the English 3. You'd also be expected to study other areas in the US.

Might be worth looking into whether your university does a study-abroad program where you could spend a semester in the US.

But, to be blunt, it is very difficult for a British person to move to the US. I would recommend studying hard to get a 1st at a well-respected university and then try to get sponsored for a work visa by a US business.
I currently work for a US business full time and am looking at doing a distance learning course for an extended diploma level 4/5. Upon completion of this, I can top up my degree to achieve a Bachelor's through specific universities. Does this change anything?
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stevesturdy
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(Original post by dragonkeeper999)
I would have thought so - the only issue I can see is that UK degrees are three rather than four years, but since many US university accept A levels for credits this implies that the first year at a US college covers stuff UK students study in sixth form (high school). Also, most UK universities make you pick your subject from day one rather than the rather broad liberal arts colleges in the US where you can study all kinds of random stuff and not declare your major for a couple of years, which means that you should have just as deep a knowledge of your major subject from a UK degree as a US one despite it taking one year less.

However, if your plan is to work in the USA after graduation it would make much more sense to study there for university - you will have access to good industry contacts and internships in American companies, have more relevant careers advice from the university, and get to know which areas of the country you would be interested in.

Are you a UK citizen/ US citizen/ other international student? It generally works out cheaper to study in your home country because of government loans/ grants etc. (big shout out to the UK government for scrapping grants lol...), but if you are a US citizen interested in studying in the UK as a study abroad opportunity, bear in mind that you can probably do a semester/ year abroad anyway as part of some American degree courses
Thanks for the feedback. I do not plan to study in the US as I work full time here in the UK for a US company. I am a UK citizen and am looking at doing a distance learning extended diploma levels 4/5 (which is equivalent to the first 2 years at university, and I can then top it up with a Bachelors again through distance learning at various universities.
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Yaboi
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(Original post by Sabertooth)
US undergrad is 4 years vs the English 3. You'd also be expected to study other areas in the US.

Might be worth looking into whether your university does a study-abroad program where you could spend a semester in the US.

But, to be blunt, it is very difficult for a British person to move to the US. I would recommend studying hard to get a 1st at a well-respected university and then try to get sponsored for a work visa by a US business.
Are you talking about for postgrad studies or for work?

didn't think they'd care about grades as long as you get 2:1 or above like they do here.
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Sabertooth
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(Original post by stevesturdy)
I currently work for a US business full time and am looking at doing a distance learning course for an extended diploma level 4/5. Upon completion of this, I can top up my degree to achieve a Bachelor's through specific universities. Does this change anything?
Yes, it does sound like that changes things.

Have you inquired with the business you work for whether they would sponsor you? You might even be able to study in the US if this business deems you "good enough".


But for what it's worth: I have a UK degree and am now studying in the US. They let me off taking a few core classes due to UK credits but I'm still expected to study at least 3 years here - including stuff like math which has no relation to my major.
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dragonkeeper999
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(Original post by stevesturdy)
Thanks for the feedback. I do not plan to study in the US as I work full time here in the UK for a US company. I am a UK citizen and am looking at doing a distance learning extended diploma levels 4/5 (which is equivalent to the first 2 years at university, and I can then top it up with a Bachelors again through distance learning at various universities.
How exactly does that extended diploma thing work? If that's what you meant by a UK degree I'm not sure it would necessarily be accepted in the US since it isn't the standard system, and I'm not aware of any reputable universities offering top-up courses from extended diplomas :/ I might be wrong though, but definitely check out all the details, talk to previous students and perhaps discuss with American universities/ companies as to whether they would accept it.
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stevesturdy
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(Original post by Sabertooth)
Yes, it does sound like that changes things.

Have you inquired with the business you work for whether they would sponsor you? You might even be able to study in the US if this business deems you "good enough".


But for what it's worth: I have a UK degree and am now studying in the US. They let me off taking a few core classes due to UK credits but I'm still expected to study at least 3 years here - including stuff like math which has no relation to my major.
I don't know if that is a good or bad thing, ha!

Yes, I have applied for a number of roles out there. The company are willing to sponsor me, but I will need to obtain a position higher up in the business to transfer through, they cannot just give anyone an opportunity to transfer, especially given how hard it is to get a Visa. With that in mind, I believe getting a degree would look significantly good. Asking the Visa specialists, they strongly recommended getting one, but they didn't know if US degrees were equivalent to UK degrees, or vice versa.
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stevesturdy
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(Original post by dragonkeeper999)
How exactly does that extended diploma thing work? If that's what you meant by a UK degree I'm not sure it would necessarily be accepted in the US since it isn't the standard system, and I'm not aware of any reputable universities offering top-up courses from extended diplomas :/ I might be wrong though, but definitely check out all the details, talk to previous students and perhaps discuss with American universities/ companies as to whether they would accept it.
Each level of Diploma will give you 120 credits. As it's level 4 and 5, this equals 240 credits and is equivalent to the 1st 2 years at university. Upon completion of this, you can top up to a full degree through an accredited University, such as Northampton, Derby & London Metropolitan. Below is the link to what I have been looking into, but if I can say I have a degree and have been working for the international company for 6 years come completion of the course, I'd be quitely confident that looks strong on my CV.

http://www.onlinebusinessschool.com/...ement-diploma/
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alberbarkalay
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No, they are not same.
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HS2030
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funny, apparently, it is the same, but our a-levels were harder compared to US, so that's why they do an extra year.
source: my extended american family
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dragonkeeper999
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(Original post by stevesturdy)
Each level of Diploma will give you 120 credits. As it's level 4 and 5, this equals 240 credits and is equivalent to the 1st 2 years at university. Upon completion of this, you can top up to a full degree through an accredited University, such as Northampton, Derby & London Metropolitan. Below is the link to what I have been looking into, but if I can say I have a degree and have been working for the international company for 6 years come completion of the course, I'd be quitely confident that looks strong on my CV.

http://www.onlinebusinessschool.com/...ement-diploma/
Have you looked into the employability of graduates from this program? Those are not exactly the best universities in the UK (although I'm sure they are good for some courses) and some employers may not really value a degree earned through distance learning at a poorly ranked institution. Also, most graduate employees aren't really that interested in the degree anyway - it's the other skills you have gained at university such as through volunteering, societies, committees, socialising, organising events, etc. which are hard to gain through distance learning degrees. Is there any particular reason you are so keen to get a degree? With all your work experience you are probably already in a better position than most graduates to launch your career anyway, without having to pay for an overpriced bit of paper saying you studied some stuff.
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dragonkeeper999
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I don't want to put you off if it's something you really want to do for personal satisfaction etc., but if you're purely career focussed then this probably isn't the best use of your time and money to be brutally honest. Do you feel like you are being held back at work due to lack of a degree? A degree in business management isn't going to teach you many complex technical skills (I can see the point in doing e.g. an engineering degree, since it is pretty much essential to become a fully qualified engineer), just build on knowledge you could gain anyway from working in a business focused role.

Perhaps talk to your line manager about possible personal development opportunities, study courses, etc. the company may be able to offer you - and some large international companies even sponsor top employees through degrees if this is something they might do for you?
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stevesturdy
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(Original post by dragonkeeper999)
Have you looked into the employability of graduates from this program? Those are not exactly the best universities in the UK (although I'm sure they are good for some courses) and some employers may not really value a degree earned through distance learning at a poorly ranked institution. Also, most graduate employees aren't really that interested in the degree anyway - it's the other skills you have gained at university such as through volunteering, societies, committees, socialising, organising events, etc. which are hard to gain through distance learning degrees. Is there any particular reason you are so keen to get a degree? With all your work experience you are probably already in a better position than most graduates to launch your career anyway, without having to pay for an overpriced bit of paper saying you studied some stuff.
No I haven't. I am bit of a newbie to this as I never looked into university previously. Who would be worth asking in that situation? Granted, but if they can see that a BA has been completed, surely they would still give this recognition?

The reason why I feel I need to go to university is because US appear heavily dependent on achieving Bachelor's to get a job and progress. My girlfriend who is in America has told me you will also get paid more, and on top of this, my work and Visa specialists have advised they really look into having the educational requirements, and they are often required to obtain a Visa.
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dragonkeeper999
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(Original post by stevesturdy)
No I haven't. I am bit of a newbie to this as I never looked into university previously. Who would be worth asking in that situation? Granted, but if they can see that a BA has been completed, surely they would still give this recognition?

The reason why I feel I need to go to university is because US appear heavily dependent on achieving Bachelor's to get a job and progress. My girlfriend who is in America has told me you will also get paid more, and on top of this, my work and Visa specialists have advised they really look into having the educational requirements, and they are often required to obtain a Visa.
Hmmm, this information should be clearly listed on their website (it's a requirement) - or if not then you should be able to find it on UniStats. You might need to look up the info for the actual BA awarding universities rather than for the online business school since they might not fit under the same regulations as they don't award full degrees. If you can't find it easily online, then email the course provider to request this information - asking for exact percentages of graduates who go on to complete the degree, percentages in further study/ employment after graduation, percentages in graduate level employment after graduation, etc.

Perhaps some places wouldn't care where you got the degree from, but they may be more inclined to trust a degree from a university they had heard of any had employed/ taught graduates from before so they can be sure of the teaching quality.

From the point of view of getting a visa though, yes I can definitely see the benefits of having a degree no matter where it's from. Some countries (quite possibly including the US, although I haven't checked - this info should be on their website) require a minimum of a bachelor's degree if you want a work visa. So if you don't have one it could be a major barrier to getting a work visa, depending on their visa requirements. From the point of view of getting paid more, again I can't imagine any employer being like "oh, he has a degree, let's double his salary" - on average, graduates earn more, yes - but various employer surveys have demonstrated that they are not really looking for just a degree (there's a reason the majority of graduates are in non-graduate jobs...), it's about all the other skills that you have. A good university will give you plenty of opportunities to develop these extra skills, e.g. through group projects, links with industry for placements/ projects/ internships, as well as various extracurricular opportunities which I can't see you getting with an online school.

Are you planning to stay on at your current company for much longer? It may be worth talking to them about potentially sponsoring a degree or what they would recommend you do in terms of personal development to move to a more senior position in the company. If you seem keen on learning new skills they may be more willing to put up the cash for a course they personally recommend and value
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stevesturdy
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Who should post it on their website, the Online Business School or the University? I've just had a quick look on UniStats under the Uni of Derby - it states I will achieve a BA/BSc depending on the course I choose, but there is no accreditation, what does this mean?

I intend to stay with my company for a while, in the UK and in the US. But when I transfer to the US, it would be under a separate segment of the business.
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shani8811
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Do yourself a favor stop asking from who has no professional knowledge about degree equivalency, most of these informations are not correct. You can top up a HND to a degree and university clearly says it's the same course same certificate as student study on the campus, degree certificate doesn't mention it's a online degree as its a accredited degree study.but it says on the transcripts mode of study is online/ distance learning. Then in that argument I can ask all of you what about the students who take online master degrees. Doesn't it has a value either it's because it's from online study, online students work so harder than regular students to pass subjects, just make sure you select the right university and well ranked one. I would recommend university of Hertfordshire /Essex. University of London international has full 3 year distance learning degree but not top up. I would say it make so much sense if you apply graduate school in US after bachelors. Don't ever try to transfer to US before bachelors. The syllabuses are really stupid and waste our time making us to 2 year prerequisites. Which is not related to degree at all and you end up studying 3 years to complete it. But once U.K. Degree completed there is a possibility you can get into graduate school and finish masters in one year. Hope this would help
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