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    (Original post by Joanna May)
    But then surely by that logic, Scottish unis should be asking for a lot higher grades than normal for English students, simply because the A levels are easier than the highers?

    (I'm not trying to pick a fight, I'm just curious)
    He was talking about Advanced Highers - which are different from Highers and are generally more comparible with A-Levels, although still don't have the same popularity in Scotland as they're a bit of an unknown quantity thus far (being created in 2001). I'd take an A-level over an AH, although the AH is probably more challenging.
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    (Original post by Libertin du Nord)
    He was talking about Advanced Highers - which are different from Highers and are generally more comparible with A-Levels, although still don't have the same popularity in Scotland as they're a bit of an unknown quantity thus far (being created in 2001). I'd take an A-level over an AH, although the AH is probably more challenging.
    I didn't see what was wrong with the CSYS.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    I didn't see what was wrong with the CSYS.
    I can't say I was old enough to experience it. I imagine it probably had the same problems at the AH does now but, in lieu of any actual change, the SQA etc just decided to shake things up and hope nobody cared enough to point out the problems which arose as a result.

    The Scottish qualifications framework needs an A-level equivilent that is respected, acknowledged and has lasted a good deal of time in order for it to have sufficient study materials etc to cater to it. Perhaps more significantly, I think we would also benefit from the introduction of sixth form colleges as in reality very few schools actually have the facilities or staff to enable study to an Advanced Higher level.

    Or, as I suggested earlier, a UK wide exams structure.
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    (Original post by Libertin du Nord)

    The Scottish qualifications framework needs an A-level equivilent that is respected, acknowledged and has lasted a good deal of time in order for it to have sufficient study materials etc to cater to it. Perhaps more significantly, I think we would also benefit from the introduction of sixth form colleges as in reality very few schools actually have the facilities or staff to enable study to an Advanced Higher level.
    I think that would, in effect, mean the scrapping of highers and education to 18. I think a major reason why the AH or the SYS before it struggled with recognition is because you can go straight to university without it.

    I was under the impression that there were many FE colleges in Scotland already?
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    I was under the impression that there were many FE colleges in Scotland already?
    Yes, but they don't offer AHs typically to my knowledge and have a very different ethos.
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    Yeah, they don't generally do Advanced Highers and only a small number of them if they do.
    AHs are pretty crap though
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    What have you got against AHs?!
    Good for us Scots to have a chance at independant learning for a change rather than being spoonfed throughout our Highers
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    AHs are harder than ALevels as far as my teachers are concerned. They go into slightly more depth than ALevels which is why we were advised to take them. My chemistry teacher had worked down in england and said that the work done in A-Level nowhere near covers what is covered in AHs yet if we scottish students go to uni with only highers we are a step behind those with A-levels coming up from england if that makes sense.
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    (Original post by Danielle89)
    AHs are harder than ALevels as far as my teachers are concerned. They go into slightly more depth than ALevels which is why we were advised to take them. My chemistry teacher had worked down in england and said that the work done in A-Level nowhere near covers what is covered in AHs yet if we scottish students go to uni with only highers we are a step behind those with A-levels coming up from england if that makes sense.
    Not only that but there is the fact that higher grades are not carried over to AH like AS grades are for A levels. Also we sit one all or nothing exam instead of sitting modules as with A levels.

    Yes the thing about only having highers and being behind is true... but for a lot of subjects if you apply to a Scottish university you can be offered direct entry into 2nd year with good A levels or AH's. Personally if I had failed to get into my first choice I could have gone into 2nd year of my backup choices based on my AH results.
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    So just to clarify, is there a catch with the low entry requirements?

    I’m from Wales; I hope to get ABB-AAB in my A-Levels. I want to study Philosophy in Edinburgh, Aberdeen or St Andrews (I think Edinburgh would be my first choice – the university that David Hume went to and all)

    For instance are there tests which are going to kick me off half way through the course? That’s pure speculation but I can’t believe there isn’t a catch. Do they put down lower entry requirements than they actually accept?
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    (Original post by Micky666)
    So just to clarify, is there a catch with the low entry requirements?

    I’m from Wales; I hope to get ABB-AAB in my A-Levels. I want to study Philosophy in Edinburgh, Aberdeen or St Andrews (I think Edinburgh would be my first choice – the university that David Hume went to and all)

    For instance are there tests which are going to kick me off half way through the course? That’s pure speculation but I can’t believe there isn’t a catch. Do they put down lower entry requirements than they actually accept?
    At St Andrews one has to qualify to enter honours (i.e. the bit where you study your chosen subject) by passing your second year above a certain standard, but most universities have such requirements. When I was there one had to get 11 out of 20 on the non-linear scale that St Andrews uses (a third) to get into honours for most courses (except undergraduate masters where good 2:1 marks were needed), so you could actually pass the year but not gain enough marks to proceed.
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    I don't get it either...I noticed edinburgh was very highly ranked for law and then see you only need 3xB's at A-level to get in :confused: Surely such a prestigious university will still want the creme de la creme so why not up them for english students? OR is there much more to the selection process than grades and they have other means of filtering you out?

    My school has said that they have had very limited success in getting students into scottish uni's though, and we had 3 students go to oxford last year so that says soemthing...
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    (Original post by Ryanm8655)
    I don't get it either...I noticed edinburgh was very highly ranked for law and then see you only need 3xB's at A-level to get in :confused: Surely such a prestigious university will still want the creme de la creme so why not up them for english students? OR is there much more to the selection process than grades and they have other means of filtering you out?

    My school has said that they have had very limited success in getting students into scottish uni's though, and we had 3 students go to oxford last year so that says soemthing...
    Scottish uni's take a preferance over scottish students because of the whole higher thing, and english uni's not accepting just plain highers when they are infact gold-standard.

    They also don't like taking too many english students in because of the fee aspect, as alot of english students apply here just to use the SAAS feature.

    Also, Edinburgh places much lower grades than required, it asks for 4xB at higher as well... however, the "realistic" grade is AAAAB. This is because they place extenuating circumstances on those who have not had anyone in their family go to uni before, and to those who come from a school with low university prospects.

    You can also look at this from another point of view as to why the ALevel req. is low. Edinburgh offers a scottish law degree, so despite its prestige and quality of teaching, English students will be reluctant to come here if they don't intend to practise law here as well.
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    O right I see...hmm...interesting...

    No-one in ym family has ever been to uni before so will I get extenuating circumstances :P

    So would I have a chance at edinburgh with AAAaa/AABaa There's alot more to my application mind as I missed a year due to a serious accident so things are very complicated lol.

    I am tempted by it as it is so prestigious plus I want to experience soemwhere new...although depending on job prospects in scotland and also whetther I do like it (I can't see any reason why I won't) I'm not sure whether or nto I would work in scotland...but there is always the conversion course to english law anyway...
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    (Original post by Josypie)
    Scottish uni's take a preferance over scottish students because of the whole higher thing, and english uni's not accepting just plain highers when they are infact gold-standard.

    They also don't like taking too many english students in because of the fee aspect, as alot of english students apply here just to use the SAAS feature.

    Also, Edinburgh places much lower grades than required, it asks for 4xB at higher as well... however, the "realistic" grade is AAAAB. This is because they place extenuating circumstances on those who have not had anyone in their family go to uni before, and to those who come from a school with low university prospects.

    You can also look at this from another point of view as to why the ALevel req. is low. Edinburgh offers a scottish law degree, so despite its prestige and quality of teaching, English students will be reluctant to come here if they don't intend to practise law here as well.
    I was under the impression that it was only Scottish and EU students who got their fees paid by SAAS, english students still have to pay
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    (Original post by SmilerNuts)
    I was under the impression that it was only Scottish and EU students who got their fees paid by SAAS, english students still have to pay

    " If you do not meet the conditions above, you may still be eligible to apply for support if you are a:

    UK national who was born in and has spent the greater part of their life in the UK"

    Taken from the official website. Of course, not all english students will get it, but a lot of english students will apply for Scotland for this service and an amount of them will be able to claim the benefit.
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    Hmn, I wonder if that's new. Cause we had English students applying here cause tuition fees were cheaper even over 4 years than they were for 3 in England but they were still expected to pay, they didn't have SAAS paying for them.
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    (Original post by SmilerNuts)
    Hmn, I wonder if that's new. Cause we had English students applying here cause tuition fees were cheaper even over 4 years than they were for 3 in England but they were still expected to pay, they didn't have SAAS paying for them.
    Perhaps it is new. The universities might also have a reluctance to deprive the Scottish students from their privelages by giving English students places despite their inability to claim SAAS.
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    Yeah, you often find unis in Scotland rejecting English applicants simply because they pay the fees themselves as opposed to SAAS paying for them :rolleyes: :p:
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    I didn't even know about this saas malarky!!
 
 
 
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