ett11
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Hi! I have an offer for Law at Sheffield for 2017, and I am seriously thinking about firming it. However, I am unable to come and visit the university.

It would be amazing if any Sheffield students could tell me the advantages and disadvantages of the Law School and just a bit about it.

How many places are there per year? What is the library like? Are the lecturers good and do you feel like you get enough support? Is there a community feel? What is the city like?

I would be really happy with any information about Law at Sheffield! Thanks
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Mosi1234$
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[QUOTE=ett11;68733400]Hi! I have an offer for Law at Sheffield for 2017, and I am seriously thinking about firming it. However, I am unable to come and visit the university.

It would be amazing if any Sheffield students could tell me the advantages and disadvantages of the Law School and just a bit about it.

How many places are there per year? What is the library like? Are the lecturers good and do you feel like you get enough support? Is there a community feel? What is the city like?

I would be really happy with any information about Law at Sheffield! Thanks

Just contact the university directly. I visited the university in the summer of 2016 and I felt a connection with the university. I have firmed Sheffield ( asking for 36 IB pts) and Manchester (asking for 32 IB points) is my insurance.
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Mosi1234$
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Where are you applying from? I am an international student, applying from Canada
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Helloworld_95
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I'll try and answer a few of your questions as a non-law student who has taken law modules.

There's about 300 people per year. The library is fairly nice but the university in general has an overpopulation problem so it gets very busy very often. Law Lecturers are mixed, but generally very good. There is a very strong community feel because chances are if you've never met someone you at least have a mutual friend or 10, and you're also likely to have a lot of shared experiences as everything is very close together and the student present pretty much runs the city centre. The city is a reasonable size, but punches above its weight so there's always new things to do, places to eat, etc.
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Lou2110
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Hey!

I'm currently in my first year doing Law at Sheffield so I'll do my best to help with your questions. First year law cohorts are large (over 200 people I'd guess at) as the modules you take in first year are all compulsory and therefore everybody on every variant of law degree (law with languages, eureopean law, law with criminology etc) are all together apart from one module a semester. So places wise there's a high intake. As the above poster said, the main university library (the IC) is fantastic but often very overcrowded and difficult to get a work space especially in deadline weeks. However I do know people who use the Western Bank library and say it's much quieter there. I would say that the majority of lecturers I have had so far have been good and the level of support I have personally found to be high although in such a large group of students it can be difficult to schedule meetings with tutors.

I think there's a large community feel on all levels as a law student in Sheffield! The city is small and friendly and very easy to navigate which allows for a more community vibe than bigger cities such as Manchester. The law student community is also very welcoming as the law school is its own building entirely and you are actively put in groups with other law students for many work exercises (seminar presentation groups etc). As well as this, there's a great community feel in the student accommodation villages.

Don't hesitate to contact me if you have any more questions and I'll try my best to answer!
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Mosi1234$
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(Original post by Lou2110)
Hey!

I'm currently in my first year doing Law at Sheffield so I'll do my best to help with your questions. First year law cohorts are large (over 200 people I'd guess at) as the modules you take in first year are all compulsory and therefore everybody on every variant of law degree (law with languages, eureopean law, law with criminology etc) are all together apart from one module a semester. So places wise there's a high intake. As the above poster said, the main university library (the IC) is fantastic but often very overcrowded and difficult to get a work space especially in deadline weeks. However I do know people who use the Western Bank library and say it's much quieter there. I would say that the majority of lecturers I have had so far have been good and the level of support I have personally found to be high although in such a large group of students it can be difficult to schedule meetings with tutors.

I think there's a large community feel on all levels as a law student in Sheffield! The city is small and friendly and very easy to navigate which allows for a more community vibe than bigger cities such as Manchester. The law student community is also very welcoming as the law school is its own building entirely and you are actively put in groups with other law students for many work exercises (seminar presentation groups etc). As well as this, there's a great community feel in the student accommodation villages.

Don't hesitate to contact me if you have any more questions and I'll try my best to answer!
Great to actually hear from somebody studying Law at Sheffield!. My questions:
1. How heavy is the workload in the first year? I will need to work at least 10 hrs per week to support myself - just want to make sure I can keep on top of studies.
2 .What is the best accommodation? I want to live in Allens court as it is close to the student union - how can I make sure I get a room at Allens court?
3. Did you meet the conditions of your offer before being accepted into the Law program? I am being asked to achieve 36 IB points with at leat least a 5 in H/L English. While possible, I think I may get 34 or 35 Ib points
4. How easy is it to make friends, especially with the students on the same course?

Enala, IB Student, Canada.
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Lou2110
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(Original post by emwanza)
Great to actually hear from somebody studying Law at Sheffield!. My questions:
1. How heavy is the workload in the first year? I will need to work at least 10 hrs per week to support myself - just want to make sure I can keep on top of studies.
2 .What is the best accommodation? I want to live in Allens court as it is close to the student union - how can I make sure I get a room at Allens court?
3. Did you meet the conditions of your offer before being accepted into the Law program? I am being asked to achieve 36 IB points with at leat least a 5 in H/L English. While possible, I think I may get 34 or 35 Ib points
4. How easy is it to make friends, especially with the students on the same course?

Enala, IB Student, Canada.
Hii!

1. The workload is relatively easy to manage as long as you are good at time management. I usually have 6 hours of lectures a week in first semester and 6 hours of seminars spread out over two weeks. Seminar prep should take you a few hours per seminar but I've been able to cope and my time management isn't the greatest!

2. Personally, I would say that living in Endcliffe student village is the best accommodation as it's the most social and the walk to uni isn't that bad! However, if being close to the students union is your priority then Allen Court (city accommodation) would probably suit you! In my experience, most people apply for Endcliffe village and so you'd probably be pretty much guaranteed Allen Court if that's what you applied for as I don't hear of many people applying there. You could always email accommodation services after you've applied to let them know of your preference!

3. I actually didn't meet the entry requirements although I took A Levels so I'm not sure how they equate to IB scores. I was accepted with A Level grades ABB this year when the entry requirements are AAA so they're pretty lenient I think.

4. Making friends on the course has been pretty easy for me. I joined the Facebook freshers pages and started talking to people on the Law course before I even arrived in Sheffield and this meant that when I arrived I had some friendly faces to meet up with! Since coming to university I've managed to make a lot more friends on my course, as you're put into groups for seminar work and have to work with new people all the time which allows you to chat to new people. I also joined the Law society (Edward Bramley Law Society) and went to their freshers bar crawl which was a really easy way to make friends on the course!

Happy to help as much as I can!!
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ett11
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(Original post by Lou2110)
Hii!

1. The workload is relatively easy to manage as long as you are good at time management. I usually have 6 hours of lectures a week in first semester and 6 hours of seminars spread out over two weeks. Seminar prep should take you a few hours per seminar but I've been able to cope and my time management isn't the greatest!

2. Personally, I would say that living in Endcliffe student village is the best accommodation as it's the most social and the walk to uni isn't that bad! However, if being close to the students union is your priority then Allen Court (city accommodation) would probably suit you! In my experience, most people apply for Endcliffe village and so you'd probably be pretty much guaranteed Allen Court if that's what you applied for as I don't hear of many people applying there. You could always email accommodation services after you've applied to let them know of your preference!

3. I actually didn't meet the entry requirements although I took A Levels so I'm not sure how they equate to IB scores. I was accepted with A Level grades ABB this year when the entry requirements are AAA so they're pretty lenient I think.

4. Making friends on the course has been pretty easy for me. I joined the Facebook freshers pages and started talking to people on the Law course before I even arrived in Sheffield and this meant that when I arrived I had some friendly faces to meet up with! Since coming to university I've managed to make a lot more friends on my course, as you're put into groups for seminar work and have to work with new people all the time which allows you to chat to new people. I also joined the Law society (Edward Bramley Law Society) and went to their freshers bar crawl which was a really easy way to make friends on the course!

Happy to help as much as I can!!
Thanks so much for all the information! It is so helpful!

How large are seminars on the whole? Also, do you feel that you get enough support with the written work that you have handed in? Is the marking useful?
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Lou2110
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(Original post by ett11)
Thanks so much for all the information! It is so helpful!

How large are seminars on the whole? Also, do you feel that you get enough support with the written work that you have handed in? Is the marking useful?
You're very welcome! I know when I was in your position I wanted as much information as I could get my hands on!!

On the whole, my seminar groups were usually between 12-15 people, which I think is helpful as it means you can get to know different people as well as being able to get concentrated support from the tutor.

With regards to written work, at this point in the semester we've only been asked to hand in one piece of written work (this wasn't compulsory but rather a non assessed piece of coursework to help us see whether we were on the right track). The feedback on this piece of work was helpful and I think the marking provides (in my case) a slight confidence boost! All tutors for that module opened up feedback hours whereby we were able to go and get one to one further feedback on our written work so I believe the level of support couldn't have been any higher!!
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ett11
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(Original post by Lou2110)
You're very welcome! I know when I was in your position I wanted as much information as I could get my hands on!!

On the whole, my seminar groups were usually between 12-15 people, which I think is helpful as it means you can get to know different people as well as being able to get concentrated support from the tutor.

With regards to written work, at this point in the semester we've only been asked to hand in one piece of written work (this wasn't compulsory but rather a non assessed piece of coursework to help us see whether we were on the right track). The feedback on this piece of work was helpful and I think the marking provides (in my case) a slight confidence boost! All tutors for that module opened up feedback hours whereby we were able to go and get one to one further feedback on our written work so I believe the level of support couldn't have been any higher!!
Thanks! Sheffield sounds like a great option!

If you see this, can I also ask you one more thing about personal tutors? How does this work, and how often do you get to see your personal tutor? What do they say?
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Helloworld_95
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(Original post by ett11)
Thanks! Sheffield sounds like a great option!

If you see this, can I also ask you one more thing about personal tutors? How does this work, and how often do you get to see your personal tutor? What do they say?
So your personal tutor is a professor that is there to give you advice on your studies, career and use of university facilities. They'll also provide your academic reference.

I think at the beginning you see them once every week or two then it becomes less often during your degree until you do your dissertation where your supervisor becomes your tutor and your meetings will vary in regularity.

What they'll say will depend on the meeting, earlier on they'll likely have a set format where your tutor will tell you about plagiarism for example then later on it becomes more of a chat about how your studies, applying for jobs, etc are going.
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ett11
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
So your personal tutor is a professor that is there to give you advice on your studies, career and use of university facilities. They'll also provide your academic reference.

I think at the beginning you see them once every week or two then it becomes less often during your degree until you do your dissertation where your supervisor becomes your tutor and your meetings will vary in regularity.

What they'll say will depend on the meeting, earlier on they'll likely have a set format where your tutor will tell you about plagiarism for example then later on it becomes more of a chat about how your studies, applying for jobs, etc are going.
Thanks for your response!
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Mosi1234$
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(Original post by ett11)
Thanks for your response!
Know anybody doing Law with French Law? I am considering this instead of doing straight Law
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ett11
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Know anybody doing Law with French Law? I am considering this instead of doing straight Law
I don't, but I was considering Law with Spanish Law before deciding to apply for straight Law. At a university fair, I asked about it, and the professor I talked to told me that they have a lecturer from the country in question who specifically teaches the Spanish/ French/ German Law. They told me that you can find out about it on the Sheffield Uni Facebook page.

I wish I could tell you more! Good luck and happy Christmas!
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neal95
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Hi I'm a second year law student at Sheffield. The degree as a whole is decent tbh and is a nice balance between coursework and exams on a lot of the modules. Some of them can be a bit dry but that's part and parcel of studying a degree like law tbh. The good thing about law at Sheffield is the flexibility you get regarding module choices in your second and third year. In the second year you get to pick options from a range of compulsory modules and for the second term, which is coming up, I have chosen interesting modules like banking and financial services regulation and private law aspects of company law which would be unavailable to study as a second year law student in other unis. In third year you get to choose 6 specialist modules which you can choose according to your interests, for example medical law. This is because you will have completed all the core modules needed for a qualifying llb in your first 2 years and now you are just making up the credits.

Law firms come in to visit fairly regularly and hold drinks events and presentations, with partners trainees grad recruitment and associates all coming. If you work hard and do well then I would reccomend Sheffield law school as its a solid russel group and if you do your end of the bargain you should be able to get a tc if you want to go into law. Also unlike other law schools there isn't really a dedicated law library, but the IC has enough law books and a lot of the stuff can be found online such as journal articles and electronic books which are helpful. Law students can also work in the law school as it has an ict suite and printing facilities if that's what you want to do.
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Mosi1234$
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(Original post by ett11)
I don't, but I was considering Law with Spanish Law before deciding to apply for straight Law. At a university fair, I asked about it, and the professor I talked to told me that they have a lecturer from the country in question who specifically teaches the Spanish/ French/ German Law. They told me that you can find out about it on the Sheffield Uni Facebook page.

I wish I could tell you more! Good luck and happy Christmas!
Thanks
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Maelyns
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What grades at A-Level did you have? Do you know what the lowest acceptance was, A-level wise?
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