Turn on thread page Beta

Is there any way to get funding for a second access course? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I am currently doing an access to nursing course, but am having a change of heart about career paths. I really want to go into medicine now, so would need to do an access to science course next year, but have been told you can only get an advanced learner loan for one course, so I would have to pay for it myself? I am not able to afford that

    Should I just give up on the dream and stick with nursing? I don't really see another way around this.

    Thanks in advance.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lizzipth_Floyd)
    I am currently doing an access to nursing course, but am having a change of heart about career paths. I really want to go into medicine now, so would need to do an access to science course next year, but have been told you can only get an advanced learner loan for one course, so I would have to pay for it myself? I am not able to afford that

    Should I just give up on the dream and stick with nursing? I don't really see another way around this.

    Thanks in advance.
    If you have already taken out an advanced learner loan then you would not be eligible for another so yes, you would have to find a way to pay for it yourself.

    Most universities that accept Access courses for Medicine will only accept Access to Medicine courses from specific colleges. There are a few that will accept Access to Science providing there are enough Chemistry units in the course but you would need to contact them individually with details of the course to see if they might consider it.

    What has made you change your mind?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Phoenix_96)
    If you have already taken out an advanced learner loan then you would not be eligible for another so yes, you would have to find a way to pay for it yourself.

    Most universities that accept Access courses for Medicine will only accept Access to Medicine courses from specific colleges. There are a few that will accept Access to Science providing there are enough Chemistry units in the course but you would need to contact them individually with details of the course to see if they might consider it.

    What has made you change your mind?
    Doing the anatomy & physiology (mainly biology) components of the Access to Nursing course. I have really enjoyed them and even my tutor recommended I should reconsider going down the medicine route. Years ago I had the dream of being a psychiatrist, but didn't pursue it due to ill-health. Now I am 24 and thought I did want to become a mental health nurse, but now doubting it.

    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lizzipth_Floyd)
    Doing the anatomy & physiology (mainly biology) components of the Access to Nursing course. I have really enjoyed them and even my tutor recommended I should reconsider going down the medicine route. Years ago I had the dream of being a psychiatrist, but didn't pursue it due to ill-health. Now I am 24 and thought I did want to become a mental health nurse, but now doubting it.

    So if you're certain that you want to go for Medicine and you really have to be certain as it is very competitive and you're committing at least 5 years of your life to the course then I think you have a couple of options:

    1) Drop out of the course you're currently studying on and see if you can transfer to the Access to Science, might be the case that you can transfer some of the units that you've already completed over to that qualification and catch up with the rest of the work that you have missed but this is at the discretion of the college you're currently studying at. You have missed the Medicine application deadline for this year so would apply next year anyways, in this time you could seek to gain some experience to help strengthen your application for when you do eventually apply. Before you take this option, I would strongly recommend you get in contact with medical schools that you are interested in and see if they accept your programme of study for entry to their medical degree. As I advised in the last post, most medical schools will only accept the Access to Medicine qualifications from specific colleges but some may be willing to accept the Access to Science instead.

    2) If you're unable to transfer over this year then you might want to consider carrying on with nursing and going for one of the options below:

    - You proceed to complete your access programme, study Nursing and proceed through the training pathways and become a specialist nurse/advanced nurse practitioner who are able to carry out many of the same duties of a doctor including diagnosis and prescribing.

    - You complete Nursing and then become a Physician's associate (which is a 2 year postgraduate programme) and you're able to carry out many of the functions of a doctor and are paid roughly the same as a mid-training doctor.

    - You complete Nursing and then apply for Graduate entry medicine, this is probably the toughest option out of the 3 as GEM courses are significantly more competitive than undergraduate medicine due to the fact that there are very few spaces.

    3) You mentioned you are quite enjoying the Biology at the moment on your course, you could as another option study towards a Biological science degree and then seek to apply for graduate entry medicine. Universities may be willing to accept you on to a biology related degree with your current access course providing there are sufficient credits in biology, I would recommend getting in contact with universities directly to see if this is possible.

    I know the ideal situation for you would be to study an Access to Medicine/Access to Science diploma next year and then apply for Medicine, if you can find a way of doing this then I would highly recommend this. It would set you back around £3000 but some colleges may be willing to allow you to pay in instalments if that would make it any easier for you to afford the costs of the course.

    What is it that specifically appeals about Psychiatry? There are other careers that you might be aware of where you can aid and support people with mental health difficulties, these include being a mental health nurse (your current plan), training as a clinical psychologist (which would entail an undergraduate psychology degree and then a doctorate), a psychological wellbeing practitioner (where you would deliver a range of talking therapies to people with mild to moderate mental health issues)

    I've probably given you a lot to think about but I wanted you to know that you have several options and that you should take your time to make an informed decision

    Best of luck!
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Phoenix_96 has given you a good comprehensive answer there and I would urge you to read it.

    As an aside, I don't want to sound rude but the sort of anatomy and physiology you cover in an Access course is awfully basic. I presume that there was more than just this that made you think medicine might be a better course?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Phoenix_96)
    So if you're certain that you want to go for Medicine and you really have to be certain as it is very competitive and you're committing at least 5 years of your life to the course then I think you have a couple of options:

    1) Drop out of the course you're currently studying on and see if you can transfer to the Access to Science, might be the case that you can transfer some of the units that you've already completed over to that qualification and catch up with the rest of the work that you have missed but this is at the discretion of the college you're currently studying at. You have missed the Medicine application deadline for this year so would apply next year anyways, in this time you could seek to gain some experience to help strengthen your application for when you do eventually apply. Before you take this option, I would strongly recommend you get in contact with medical schools that you are interested in and see if they accept your programme of study for entry to their medical degree. As I advised in the last post, most medical schools will only accept the Access to Medicine qualifications from specific colleges but some may be willing to accept the Access to Science instead.

    2) If you're unable to transfer over this year then you might want to consider carrying on with nursing and going for one of the options below:

    - You proceed to complete your access programme, study Nursing and proceed through the training pathways and become a specialist nurse/advanced nurse practitioner who are able to carry out many of the same duties of a doctor including diagnosis and prescribing.

    - You complete Nursing and then become a Physician's associate (which is a 2 year postgraduate programme) and you're able to carry out many of the functions of a doctor and are paid roughly the same as a mid-training doctor.

    - You complete Nursing and then apply for Graduate entry medicine, this is probably the toughest option out of the 3 as GEM courses are significantly more competitive than undergraduate medicine due to the fact that there are very few spaces.

    3) You mentioned you are quite enjoying the Biology at the moment on your course, you could as another option study towards a Biological science degree and then seek to apply for graduate entry medicine. Universities may be willing to accept you on to a biology related degree with your current access course providing there are sufficient credits in biology, I would recommend getting in contact with universities directly to see if this is possible.

    I know the ideal situation for you would be to study an Access to Medicine/Access to Science diploma next year and then apply for Medicine, if you can find a way of doing this then I would highly recommend this. It would set you back around £3000 but some colleges may be willing to allow you to pay in instalments if that would make it any easier for you to afford the costs of the course.

    What is it that specifically appeals about Psychiatry? There are other careers that you might be aware of where you can aid and support people with mental health difficulties, these include being a mental health nurse (your current plan), training as a clinical psychologist (which would entail an undergraduate psychology degree and then a doctorate), a psychological wellbeing practitioner (where you would deliver a range of talking therapies to people with mild to moderate mental health issues)

    I've probably given you a lot to think about but I wanted you to know that you have several options and that you should take your time to make an informed decision

    Best of luck!
    Hi. Thank you so much for your post. Sorry about the late response, I did not get a notification.

    Having explored practical options further, I have been told I can't transfer courses due to registration.

    I think I have these options.
    - After this course, apply for a two year A level programme at my college in biology, chemistry and physics. I have been informed funding would be available for this as it is a different 'type' of course. The downside of this is that it is another two years, and it would be alongside 16-18 year olds.
    - Complete nursing degree and explore the options you stated. I believe if I decided to try for post-grad entry to medicine I would still need a chemistry A level?
    - Apply through clearing for a biomedical science degree, although I am not sure how realistic/viable this option would be.

    Something that attracts me to psychiatry is that, unlike physiological medicine (although I know there is an inexorable link) there is no standard protocol for treatment. Each patient is unique, and my formulations to help them would be individual to them, holistically. I am becoming disillusioned by the idea of being a mental health nurse and the impact I could have, bearing in the mind nhs pressures and cut backs. I have experienced the 'system' myself and it is shocking, the lack of empathy from qualified nurses is often stark, and I wonder if, after a while, most nurses end up like that - 'compassion fatigued' and drained of empathy by the failing mental health system. I have always been interested in psychiatry, but never believed I could pursue after a lengthy illness myself. Three quarters of me still believes I can't do it, and am too old now to pursue, but I don't want to chase a career that ultimately I won't love doing. Salary is honestly insignificant to me; if I could make as much as an impact as a nurse than as a psychiatrist I would become the first. I also enjoy research and would love to be at the forefront of that. I have enjoyed the biological aspects of the access course more than I ever thought I would, in fact I find it fascinating. The 'professional healthcare practice' modules I find dull and uninspiring, and a bit like common sense. If I follow the nursing path, that it what I will be doing for 3 more years with a tiny bit of anatomy and physiology thrown in, but nowhere near the detail I would like to go into, as would be with medicine/science.

    Hope some of that makes sense. Early morning thoughts. I have started to receive interviews for MH nursing so I really need to make a decision soon.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reality Check)
    Phoenix_96 has given you a good comprehensive answer there and I would urge you to read it.

    As an aside, I don't want to sound rude but the sort of anatomy and physiology you cover in an Access course is awfully basic. I presume that there was more than just this that made you think medicine might be a better course?
    Hi. I understand that and I feel frustrated by how basic it is, and want to learn more. I feel saddened when I think that, if I follow nursing, I will not learn much more in the next 3 years.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lizzipth_Floyd)
    Hi. Thank you so much for your post. Sorry about the late response, I did not get a notification.

    Having explored practical options further, I have been told I can't transfer courses due to registration.

    I think I have these options.
    - After this course, apply for a two year A level programme at my college in biology, chemistry and physics. I have been informed funding would be available for this as it is a different 'type' of course. The downside of this is that it is another two years, and it would be alongside 16-18 year olds.
    - Complete nursing degree and explore the options you stated. I believe if I decided to try for post-grad entry to medicine I would still need a chemistry A level?
    - Apply through clearing for a biomedical science degree, although I am not sure how realistic/viable this option would be.

    Something that attracts me to psychiatry is that, unlike physiological medicine (although I know there is an inexorable link) there is no standard protocol for treatment. Each patient is unique, and my formulations to help them would be individual to them, holistically. I am becoming disillusioned by the idea of being a mental health nurse and the impact I could have, bearing in the mind nhs pressures and cut backs. I have experienced the 'system' myself and it is shocking, the lack of empathy from qualified nurses is often stark, and I wonder if, after a while, most nurses end up like that - 'compassion fatigued' and drained of empathy by the failing mental health system. I have always been interested in psychiatry, but never believed I could pursue after a lengthy illness myself. Three quarters of me still believes I can't do it, and am too old now to pursue, but I don't want to chase a career that ultimately I won't love doing. Salary is honestly insignificant to me; if I could make as much as an impact as a nurse than as a psychiatrist I would become the first. I also enjoy research and would love to be at the forefront of that. I have enjoyed the biological aspects of the access course more than I ever thought I would, in fact I find it fascinating. The 'professional healthcare practice' modules I find dull and uninspiring, and a bit like common sense. If I follow the nursing path, that it what I will be doing for 3 more years with a tiny bit of anatomy and physiology thrown in, but nowhere near the detail I would like to go into, as would be with medicine/science.

    Hope some of that makes sense. Early morning thoughts. I have started to receive interviews for MH nursing so I really need to make a decision soon.
    Not sure if you could get into biomedical sciences through clearing without having A-levels? Most insitutions require A-level Chemistry and Biology as a condition of entry, you'd struggle to do the course without having much prior scientific knowledge (unlikey that biological aspects in your Access to Nursing would suffice but you could ask universities directly).

    You need to also bear in mind that a medical degree is five to six years of hard work. Afterwards you'll have to do two years of general foundation training, before you are able start to spend the next six training as a psychiatrist.

    If you are certain that you don't want to be a MHN, then don't pursue it. You have a few options. You could study the required A-levels and apply directly for medicine. Medicine is extremely competitive, so failing that you'd end up on biomedical sciences (usually the 5th UCAS choice as one is only permitted to apply to a maximum of four medical schools). Thereafter, if you did well you could apply for graduate entry into medicine.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by habeas.corpus)
    Not sure if you could get into biomedical sciences through clearing without having A-levels? Most insitutions require A-level Chemistry and Biology as a condition of entry, you'd struggle to do the course without having much prior scientific knowledge (unlikey that biological aspects in your Access to Nursing would suffice but you could ask universities directly).

    You need to also bear in mind that a medical degree is five to six years of hard work. Afterwards you'll have to do two years of general foundation training, before you are able start to spend the next six training as a psychiatrist.
    I thought as much. I think that narrows it down to two options.

    Yes, that is another factor. I don't know if I could afford to follow a 13 year path of training/education.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lizzipth_Floyd)
    I thought as much. I think that narrows it down to two options.

    Yes, that is another factor. I don't know if I could afford to follow a 13 year path of training/education.
    Doctors start getting paid after they've graduated. You do get a salary for on the job training. Although the hours are hellishly long for junior doctors. The 8 years of practical training it takes to be a psychiatrist are salaried.

    Also bear in mind that only a tiny part of 5 year medicine degree will be about psychiatry. And thereafter, your two year rotational training will be in various areas of medicine. However, during the course of that it might transpire that you want to work in another area of medicine.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    i am also doing access to nursing i woud like some help with psychology, biology and chemistry
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    can someone help me please i am really struggling and my ambition is study adult nursing in uni
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by habeas.corpus)
    Not sure if you could get into biomedical sciences through clearing without having A-levels? Most insitutions require A-level Chemistry and Biology as a condition of entry, you'd struggle to do the course without having much prior scientific knowledge (unlikey that biological aspects in your Access to Nursing would suffice but you could ask universities directly).

    You need to also bear in mind that a medical degree is five to six years of hard work. Afterwards you'll have to do two years of general foundation training, before you are able start to spend the next six training as a psychiatrist.

    If you are certain that you don't want to be a MHN, then don't pursue it. You have a few options. You could study the required A-levels and apply directly for medicine. Medicine is extremely competitive, so failing that you'd end up on biomedical sciences (usually the 5th UCAS choice as one is only permitted to apply to a maximum of four medical schools). Thereafter, if you did well you could apply for graduate entry into medicine.
    Just wanted to chip in, I was offered a place on biomedical sciences after applying for adult nursing and being turned down, they said I was suited to it from my statement. I only had access to Nursing and a degree in business studies, this was at Leicester de Montfort for Sep 2016. I declined and accepted adult nursing at Derby. Good luck


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gladis thomas)
    can someone help me please i am really struggling and my ambition is study adult nursing in uni
    What's wrong Gladys, I did access to Nursing, what are you struggling with I can try to help.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Name:  14816988106691355933611.jpg
Views: 287
Size:  518.1 KBAttachment 602852602854
    Attached Images
     
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    What element of this are you struggling with? Have you covered any case studies in class?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    You are now allowed up to 3 seperate loans. Teems were changed earlier in the year. Hope this helps. Still complete your course though.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dal200888)
    You are now allowed up to 3 seperate loans. Teems were changed earlier in the year. Hope this helps. Still complete your course though.
    Not including same type of course? So couldn't get loans for two access courses right?
 
 
 

University open days

  • Heriot-Watt University
    School of Textiles and Design Undergraduate
    Fri, 16 Nov '18
  • University of Roehampton
    All departments Undergraduate
    Sat, 17 Nov '18
  • Edge Hill University
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Undergraduate
    Sat, 17 Nov '18
Poll
Have you ever experienced bullying?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.