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Airport Fairy
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Looking through the "mickey mouse subject" threads, it seems as though loads of people have classed English as a useless degree subject. I was always under the impression that English degrees were very highly regarded and could act as the stepping stone to any number of careers. In fact, I was told that you could do pretty much anything you wanted with an English degree as long as it wasn't something which required a specific type of degree, eg. medicine or engineering. I was told it leaves a lot of options open. But there seem to be so many people who think it's not worth doing, I was wondering if anyone could shed any light on this. I don't agree with these people, but does this mean English is not very well-respected with employers either? Your thoughts, please. :confused:
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Muse
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i've never thought of english as a 'mickey mouse' subject. IMO, english is a well respected degree, however when combined with certain subjects in joint honours programmes, it can become diluted.

oh, and english students get too much time off and watch trisha far too often.
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Airport Fairy
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*is scandalised*

It's not time off! It's time to read the books we are studying!


Trisha = meh. When I went for my Oxford interview everyone was watching it in the JCR. Grrr......oh well. At least when I got my rejection letter my first thought was, "At least I don't have to watch Trisha for 3 years!"
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Airport Fairy
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What about single honours English in a traditional uni? At the moment my list is Manchester, Warwick, Bristol, Exeter, Cardiff and one other.
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shiny
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English is not useless.
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Tajel
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(Original post by shiny)
English is not useless.
Indeed not.

Having just been through the interview process, I can safely say that everyone who interviewed me couldn't have cared less what my degree was in.

Of course, the British government has run a successful, decades-long campaign to convince Britons that every degree should be, in some way, vocational.

I'm happy to have been offered a good job; I'm equally happy that the interviewers were not concerned about the fact that my degree isn't related in any way to the sector in which I'll be working. They were smart enough to go beyond that, to find out why my degree made me suited to the job.

Here's a thought: my liberal arts degree would have been just as useful in a completely different sector. Can you say the same about a vocational degree? What if there aren't any golf courses needing managed?
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Random.Girl
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I think some people have the idea that humanities and arts degrees are lesser than science degrees because the time spent in lectures, tutorials and whatnot are a lot less. While this is true, humanities and arts students have a lot of reading/researching etc to do outside of lectures. My friend is doing English Literature and she has had so many books to read and so many essays to do.

Don't worry what other people are saying. English at a traditional university like the ones you've listed will be very highly regarded!

Btw come to Cardiff cause it's amazing
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trinigyal
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(Original post by -Emmz-)
Btw come to Cardiff cause it's amazing
Will do!
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