Zarzeeboo24
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So I've been researching the courses I want to do at A level and one of the courses, French, requires GCSE French. I was just wondering how

(If it helps, I'm naturally talented at languages and most of my grades are pretty high)
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studentreader
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Maybe ask your school if they'll let you study French there?

I'm homeshooled, so I'm (mainly) self-studying my French GCSE. The best way to get started is just to buy a text-book (CGP are good and have very useful grammar explanations) and start working through the syllabus. At this level the grammar doesn't get TOO complicated, and you mention you're talented at languages, so I don't think you'll find it too hard XP Obviously, you'd need to practice listening and speaking seperately.

There are lots of great French resoucres out there online. You might find it useful to check out Duolingo (which goes up to about GCSE level, though you'll have to check what specific vocabularly you need), or the CoffeeBreak French podcasts (which you can get free on itunes, they go from basic beginner through to advanced levels). Also, apps like Tandem and HelloTalk are very helpful, which allow you to text/call/skype native speakers of the language. If you're completely new to French, the Michel Thomas courses are a really good starting point - they're not cheap to buy, but you should be able to get them from the library. Obviously, you'll need to find out the specific requirements of the examination board and learn the relavent vocabulary.

Can I ask how you were thinking of taking your exam? E.g. entering at a local education centre as an external candidate? I hope that answers some of your questions
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CoffeeAndPolitics
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(Original post by studentreader)
Maybe ask your school if they'll let you study French there?

I'm homeshooled, so I'm (mainly) self-studying my French GCSE. The best way to get started is just to buy a text-book (CGP are good and have very useful grammar explanations) and start working through the syllabus. At this level the grammar doesn't get TOO complicated, and you mention you're talented at languages, so I don't think you'll find it too hard XP Obviously, you'd need to practice listening and speaking seperately.

There are lots of great French resoucres out there online. You might find it useful to check out Duolingo (which goes up to about GCSE level, though you'll have to check what specific vocabularly you need), or the CoffeeBreak French podcasts (which you can get free on itunes, they go from basic beginner through to advanced levels). Also, apps like Tandem and HelloTalk are very helpful, which allow you to text/call/skype native speakers of the language. If you're completely new to French, the Michel Thomas courses are a really good starting point - they're not cheap to buy, but you should be able to get them from the library. Obviously, you'll need to find out the specific requirements of the examination board and learn the relavent vocabulary.

Can I ask how you were thinking of taking your exam? E.g. entering at a local education centre as an external candidate? I hope that answers some of your questions
I don't think GCSE French is at all easy to learn if you self study it but if you're good at languages then you should manage with the resources that are available out there but the disadvantage really I think is not having a teacher or someone fluent at French to support you. If you're fluent at French, then it's a walk in the park I think.

Also advise given above is good. (Will give rep )
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Zarzeeboo24
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(Original post by studentreader)
Maybe ask your school if they'll let you study French there?

I'm homeshooled, so I'm (mainly) self-studying my French GCSE. The best way to get started is just to buy a text-book (CGP are good and have very useful grammar explanations) and start working through the syllabus. At this level the grammar doesn't get TOO complicated, and you mention you're talented at languages, so I don't think you'll find it too hard XP Obviously, you'd need to practice listening and speaking seperately.

There are lots of great French resoucres out there online. You might find it useful to check out Duolingo (which goes up to about GCSE level, though you'll have to check what specific vocabularly you need), or the CoffeeBreak French podcasts (which you can get free on itunes, they go from basic beginner through to advanced levels). Also, apps like Tandem and HelloTalk are very helpful, which allow you to text/call/skype native speakers of the language. If you're completely new to French, the Michel Thomas courses are a really good starting point - they're not cheap to buy, but you should be able to get them from the library. Obviously, you'll need to find out the specific requirements of the examination board and learn the relavent vocabulary.

Can I ask how you were thinking of taking your exam? E.g. entering at a local education centre as an external candidate? I hope that answers some of your questions
Thank you so much! My mum is really interested in languages too (she's fluent in German, Spanish and ENglish) so I think she's very supportive of my interest...because I'm doing GCSE Spanish through my school, I think I won't need to worry about that one too much, since I obviously have all the help from my teachers and my mum.

As for French, I was thinking of speaking to my school's French teacher, who taught me in year 8 (I'm in year 10), so she sort of knows my abilities and she could hopefully give me advice. I was going to enter through school, but if I can't then I'd definietly go to a local centre as an external candidate. Either way, there is no doubt that I want to do it, since it's what I need for A level. Some of my friends are doing GCSE French at school, and they've said that they really haven't covered a lot - mostly textbook work, whic I can easily do.

THank you so, so much for your help though!!
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Zarzeeboo24
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(Original post by CoffeeAndPolitics)
I don't think GCSE French is at all easy to learn if you self study it but if you're good at languages then you should manage with the resources that are available out there but the disadvantage really I think is not having a teacher or someone fluent at French to support you. If you're fluent at French, then it's a walk in the park I think.

Also advise given above is good. (Will give rep )
I think what I might do is either get a tutor (I've spoken to my mum about it and she's willing) or spend some time after school to speak to my French teacher to help make sure I'm up to date.
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CoffeeAndPolitics
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(Original post by Zarzeeboo24)
I think what I might do is either get a tutor (I've spoken to my mum about it and she's willing) or spend some time after school to speak to my French teacher to help make sure I'm up to date.
I would opt for the latter option tbh as he/she knows you better and can assist you as required compared to a tutor who doesn't know you v. well.
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iasatf
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(Original post by studentreader)
Maybe ask your school if they'll let you study French there?

I'm homeshooled, so I'm (mainly) self-studying my French GCSE. The best way to get started is just to buy a text-book (CGP are good and have very useful grammar explanations) and start working through the syllabus. At this level the grammar doesn't get TOO complicated, and you mention you're talented at languages, so I don't think you'll find it too hard XP Obviously, you'd need to practice listening and speaking seperately.

There are lots of great French resoucres out there online. You might find it useful to check out Duolingo (which goes up to about GCSE level, though you'll have to check what specific vocabularly you need), or the CoffeeBreak French podcasts (which you can get free on itunes, they go from basic beginner through to advanced levels). Also, apps like Tandem and HelloTalk are very helpful, which allow you to text/call/skype native speakers of the language. If you're completely new to French, the Michel Thomas courses are a really good starting point - they're not cheap to buy, but you should be able to get them from the library. Obviously, you'll need to find out the specific requirements of the examination board and learn the relavent vocabulary.

Can I ask how you were thinking of taking your exam? E.g. entering at a local education centre as an external candidate? I hope that answers some of your questions
How would you suggest working through the syllabus?
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