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    Hello, I've started thinking about the modules I'm going to take - they all seems good! :p: Could you please comment on these three courses? Thanks

    HS1113 From Mao to Mandela: Twentieth-Century Political Leaders in the non-Western World

    HS1109 Conflict and Identity in the Modern World from 1789 to the Present

    HS1107 Republics, Kings and People: The Foundations of European Political Thought from Plato to Rousseau
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    What exactly is it you want to know? Course content, what the lecturers are like..or everything?
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    Totally interested in this topic, too. I have no idea what modules I'm gonna choose! Not sure what Gosha was after, but can you run me some idea of what the courses are, the sort of coursework we'd get, and how the lecturers are, like as in teaching style and personality? Always an important thing. Thanks a million!
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    (Original post by Coral)
    Totally interested in this topic, too. I have no idea what modules I'm gonna choose! Not sure what Gosha was after, but can you run me some idea of what the courses are, the sort of coursework we'd get, and how the lecturers are, like as in teaching style and personality? Always an important thing. Thanks a million!

    exactly this kind of info i've read the decriptions and course contents online for all three (there was no content for the dictators though) so I would be more interested in how they are in reality
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    The History staff are great - so many of them are characters! Emmett Sullivan, Justin Champion, Clive Burgess...
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    i saw erm on the staff list and all the ppl that are mentioned actually look like they have a good personality and brain oif u know what i mean.. u can see thru the photo somehow i think
    and woo, Clive's my dads name.. not heard too much
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    Nigel Saul is great, too. He was away on sabbatical during the year we've just had, but I think he's back again for the new term. He looks a bit severe but is the opposite really - he's really nice, and is a really good lecturer. I had him for my group 3 during my 3rd year and he really made the historical characters come alive!
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    Oh and how's Helen Graham? She's my personla adviser
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    1 of my A level teachers was so harsh, but the other was the least harshest teacher
    he had terrible handwriting but was very enthusiastic
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    (Original post by Gosha)
    Hello, I've started thinking about the modules I'm going to take - they all seems good! :p: Could you please comment on these three courses? Thanks

    HS1113 From Mao to Mandela: Twentieth-Century Political Leaders in the non-Western World

    HS1109 Conflict and Identity in the Modern World from 1789 to the Present

    HS1107 Republics, Kings and People: The Foundations of European Political Thought from Plato to Rousseau
    I wasn't at Royal Holloway in the 1st year so i can't really help about these specific courses. Who does the Republics unit?
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    (Original post by Kew)
    I wasn't at Royal Holloway in the 1st year so i can't really help about these specific courses. Who does the Republics unit?
    I can't find it anywhere.. So you transfered there?
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    Republics is taught by justin champion!! I did the course as one of my gateways..at first I liked it, than hated it, and now the course is over, I can see the good things about it..I think I just disliked it as I'm not a politics oriented person, but I'm glad I did it!! Plus, I somehow got a 67 in it overall, which is amazing considering I thought I'd do atrociously!!


    Emmet and Justin - complete legends!! Emmett is really into economic history, and so his lectures will mostly have an emphasis on this. (You'll see what I mean if you're in any of his lectures) He also jokes a lot during lectures too and is quite 'loud', but in a good way. lol. I dunno how to describe Justin really. Great guy though, lol. I guess there are some lecturers you will just click with and that'll make you enjoy the course more, and there will be others who maybe don't inspire you as much, or deliver the lecture in such an active way that makes you sit up and take note. Then again, it also depends on your mood at the time. Everyone's different!!

    You will get this info when you choose your courses with a lot more info, but anyways this is vaguely what I remember.. (if I find the handout I was given at the beginning of the year, I'll let you know, but from what I remember, you don't generally get more than a really small paragraph outlining the course)

    You study 4 units, which are broken up into gateway courses (which are worth one unit each), and other foundation courses which are worth 0.5 units.

    Gateway courses:
    In the first year, you choose two gateway courses (equal to one unit each), from a list of 5. The topics are:

    Gods, men and power (ancient history, I think, so you study ancient empires and peoples..I didn't do this course so I'm unsure as to what it entails)
    Republics Kings and People, The Foundations of modern political culture: (you study various peoples books on their ideal political state, from Plato from Rousseau, so ancient, to modern really. As you go along the course, you tend to compare the books and the ideas/points raised by the authors about why their ideal state is so, and it is literary in a way (well it was for me as I ended up defining their choice of words..dunno if it's good or not having done english A level, but hey!!) There is only one lecturer for this topic - justin Champion
    Conflict and Identity: From 1789 til the present day (which is modern history, i.e. from the industrial revolution to the present day, well I think it was about 1975 possibly but I didn't do much work at the end of term so I'm not 100% sure ) You have different lecturers for this course, as it covers a large period and I guess the lecturers specialise in different things, hence there being so many doing this course. (Not saying which ones I didn't like much though, I'll leave you to draw your own conclusions :P ) I think it's basically key events in modern European history that you study, as it is geared a lot towards Britain, France and Germany from what I remember. I really loved this course (I already did a lot of the stuff at A level, but it was good to take it to a higher level). You study things like revolutions, wars and the 'little people' as I like to call them being proactive (such as the luddites in the industrial revolution who disliked the labour saving machinery as it meant they were out of jobs, or the 3rd estate in the french revolution calling for a radical social change of the existing unequal/unfair order) also the concept of nationalism - how does one define/identify themselves, and what society was like after the wars, a bit of thatcherism and the such like.
    The rich tapestry of life: a social and cultural history: i didn't do this course, but I think it takes a thematic approach and it covers the early modern period..it looks at witchcraft, manners and err other stuff lol. It's taught by Sandra Cavallo and Hugo Blake
    Leaders of the 20th Century: leaders in the non western world: Here you study people such as nelson mandela, saddam hussein etc. (I didn't do this one either, so have no clue what it's about. Have no clue who it's taught by!!

    In the gateways, you have to do two essays (formative) a term for each, which doesn't count towards your final 1st year grade, but you have to do them to complete the year. Additionally, you have to do presentations on a lecture topic, which you can do in pairs I think. Over the easter holidays you have to complete an essay (assessed) for each of your gateways which goes toward your 1st year grade. You will get given a list of titles to choose from, which are similar to the things you have covered during the academic year. You will not get given a reading list for this, as you can use the one you were given for the course at the start of the year, and there's lots of books to choose from in the library anyway!! The assessed essay is worth 30%, and the exam is worth 70%. However, the Leaders in the 20th century does not have an exam, but instead has 2 courseworks to be completed over the easter, as well as presentations through out the course. You're also expected to contribute in seminars to discussions (I never did for republics, as I had no clue what to say apart from the basics..I probably should have read the books properly instead of skimming them, but you live and learn!!)

    When I say "counts towards your first year", I don't mean that your 1st year counts towards your degree. You only have to pass the first year - 40% - but say if you wanted to apply for an internship somewhere during the summer hols, getting a 2.1 or a 1st would be a lot better, plus you need 40% to carry onto your second year.

    The Foundation courses are split up into a few areas:
    1) Doing History Part 1 (taken in term 1, worth 0.5 unit)
    2) Doing History Part 2 (taken in term 2, worth 0.5 unit)
    3) History and Meanings (taken in term 1, worth 0.5 unit)
    4) The Material World (taken in term 2, worth 0.5 unit)
    5) Economic History (taken in term 2 in place of either 'doing history part 1' or 'material world', worth 0.5 unit)
    6) Latin for Historians (taken in terms 1 and 2, and in term 2 you either don't do 'doing history part 2' or 'material world', worth 0.5 unit *I think*)

    You have to do 4 half units if I'm adding up correctly, but this depends on whether you're doing joint honours or straight degree.


    I vaguely remember the doing histories consist of about 10 lectures on different topics, but you spend 2 weeks on one topic, and have one seminar on each topic. For example, I think the first two lectures were on "Saints cults and their relics", and then after the first lecture, half of the year would have their seminar with the lecturer and the teaching assistants, and the next week the lecture on this topic would continue, and the other half of the year would have their seminar after that with the lecturer and the teaching assistant. You would then have to do some reading for the seminar, possibly ahead of the lecture depending on when your seminar was, and discuss that in the group. For each topic you would have an essay to do (1000 words an essay) which is in a booklet you get given for each course, so for 'doing history part 1' you would have 5 essays to do, and I think the deadline is the end of term, but it's better to do them as you go along I think, so they're fresh in your mind, rather than end up with a big pile of essays to do at the end when you can't even remember stuff from the lecture, but whatever works for you!! (Plus the library doesn't always have the books specified in the reading list, so you may have to go elsewhere, and there's always a last minute dash for books!!) I think the aim here is to familiarise yourself with different type of historical sources e.g. domestic spaces/interiors, paintings, photographic images, inventories, government papers and such like (will make more sense when you do it, I guarantee!!) These courses are taught by various lecturers of the department.

    History and meanings - you have about 10 lectures and you then choose one essay to do in the booklet given to you, with a reading list provided. Every other week you have seminars with the pHD students vaguely relating to the lectures. Some people didn't bother to turn up to all the lectures, and got their friends to sign them in as they didnt see the point in coming if you only had to do one essay, but in the 3rd year you have to re-visit history and meanings, so i wouldn't advise bunking, however annoying the 9am lecture on a friday is!! All I can remember from the course content is looking at feminism, anthropology, the invention of the footnote and something to do with Herodotus. It's taught by Penny Corfield, who is so lovely!!!

    The Material World - consisted of lectures on the world around us, (buildings, food, religion, bones and other stuff I can't remember as I don't think I read most of the lecture notes as towards the end they didn't seem relevant..I took my laptops to lectures and went online!! Lots of other people did this too, lol..and made notes for their other courses) and a trip to Guildford in which we had to identify various buildings, what period they dated from, what they were made of and their geographical location (this was a test btw, partly done in pairs or threes, then an individual one marked by our friends..hmm lol). There was also a group project (about 5 people in a group..and you couldn't do it with your friends, you were all randomly chosen by the lecturer))- everyone had to unit under one particular object or theme, something to do with being important historically I think it was or having some sort of impact. Everyone had to do an individual essay (2000 words) and it then had to be put together as though it were one long dissertation type essay (so it would then be about 10,000). Additionally, the group then has to do a powerpoint presentation on their topic. (My group's went so badly wrong, but was hilarious!!) This course is done by Hugo Blake

    I didn't study economic history so I have no clue about this foundation course!!

    Didn't do latin either, but from what I gather, you do various exercises in a text book, learn grammar etc. much like you would a language in school. You do have an exam for this, I think it may be a translation, but don't quote me on that!!

    You don't have exams for any foundation course, it is all coursework, apart from latin which is assessed by examination

    Someone correct me if I'm wrong about anything..
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    (Original post by Gosha)
    I can't find it anywhere.. So you transfered there?
    Yeah. I was at Reading University doing Music and History, and then they decided to close down the Music Department there. As part of the closing down process, at the end of the year they transferred all the then 1st-years straight into the 2nd year at RHUL. Luckily for me, RH's joint honours History and Music course had just been validated, so I was able to take it - the first ever student to take it at RHUL! So I suppose I was a bit of a trailblazer in a way.
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    (Original post by Kew)
    Yeah. I was at Reading University doing Music and History, and then they decided to close down the Music Department there. As part of the closing down process, at the end of the year they transferred all the then 1st-years straight into the 2nd year at RHUL. Luckily for me, RH's joint honours History and Music course had just been validated, so I was able to take it - the first ever student to take it at RHUL! So I suppose I was a bit of a trailblazer in a way.
    wow, i thoguht they'd keep it for the next 2 years nd just not letnew people in
    so did you like RHUL compared?
    is reading far? (i should know this dammit, my mum lived there once, but before ii was born)
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    so how are the essays? is it much harder compared to like IB (or A-level)? are they all like the extended essay we do in IB? man i'm nervous, i did ok in ib (average 6 sometimes 7) but i'm afraid it will be a great leap and i'll fall behind or sthg...
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    DON'T do material world unless you absolutely have to, the fun of laughing at hugo blake and the farce that was our group project didn't come close to making up for spending an hour each week losing the will to live (despite the laptop on the internet thing) and an absolutely horrendous trip to Guildford. Personally I'd much prefer to take Economic history, Greek or Latin, because I might learn something useful besides to avoid Hugo's courses in the 2nd and 3rd years (which was the threat that was used to get people to hand their forms in on time, which says something)


    (Original post by Hana)
    History and meanings - you have about 10 lectures and you then choose one essay to do in the booklet given to you, with a reading list provided. Every other week you have seminars with the pHD students vaguely relating to the lectures. Some people didn't bother to turn up to all the lectures, and got their friends to sign them in as they didnt see the point in coming if you only had to do one essay, but in the 3rd year you have to re-visit history and meanings, so i wouldn't advise bunking, however annoying the 9am lecture on a friday is!! All I can remember from the course content is looking at feminism, anthropology, the invention of the footnote and something to do with Herodotus. It's taught by Penny Corfield, who is so lovely!!!
    Hana, I'm worried, really worried.
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    Do you know whether it is possible for somebody doing Ancient History to transfer over to History (V100)?
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    (Original post by Hana_1987)
    Republics is taught by justin champion!! I did the course as one of my gateways..at first I liked it, than hated it, and now the course is over, I can see the good things about it..I think I just disliked it as I'm not a politics oriented person, but I'm glad I did it!! Plus, I somehow got a 67 in it overall, which is amazing considering I thought I'd do atrociously!!


    Emmet and Justin - complete legends!! Emmett is really into economic history, and so his lectures will mostly have an emphasis on this. (You'll see what I mean if you're in any of his lectures) He also jokes a lot during lectures too and is quite 'loud', but in a good way. lol. I dunno how to describe Justin really. Great guy though, lol. I guess there are some lecturers you will just click with and that'll make you enjoy the course more, and there will be others who maybe don't inspire you as much, or deliver the lecture in such an active way that makes you sit up and take note. Then again, it also depends on your mood at the time. Everyone's different!!

    You will get this info when you choose your courses with a lot more info, but anyways this is vaguely what I remember.. (if I find the handout I was given at the beginning of the year, I'll let you know, but from what I remember, you don't generally get more than a really small paragraph outlining the course)

    You study 4 units, which are broken up into gateway courses (which are worth one unit each), and other foundation courses which are worth 0.5 units.

    Gateway courses:
    In the first year, you choose two gateway courses (equal to one unit each), from a list of 5. The topics are:

    Gods, men and power (ancient history, I think, so you study ancient empires and peoples..I didn't do this course so I'm unsure as to what it entails)
    Republics Kings and People, The Foundations of modern political culture: (you study various peoples books on their ideal political state, from Plato from Rousseau, so ancient, to modern really. As you go along the course, you tend to compare the books and the ideas/points raised by the authors about why their ideal state is so, and it is literary in a way (well it was for me as I ended up defining their choice of words..dunno if it's good or not having done english A level, but hey!!) There is only one lecturer for this topic - justin Champion
    Conflict and Identity: From 1789 til the present day (which is modern history, i.e. from the industrial revolution to the present day, well I think it was about 1975 possibly but I didn't do much work at the end of term so I'm not 100% sure ) You have different lecturers for this course, as it covers a large period and I guess the lecturers specialise in different things, hence there being so many doing this course. (Not saying which ones I didn't like much though, I'll leave you to draw your own conclusions :P ) I think it's basically key events in modern European history that you study, as it is geared a lot towards Britain, France and Germany from what I remember. I really loved this course (I already did a lot of the stuff at A level, but it was good to take it to a higher level). You study things like revolutions, wars and the 'little people' as I like to call them being proactive (such as the luddites in the industrial revolution who disliked the labour saving machinery as it meant they were out of jobs, or the 3rd estate in the french revolution calling for a radical social change of the existing unequal/unfair order) also the concept of nationalism - how does one define/identify themselves, and what society was like after the wars, a bit of thatcherism and the such like.
    The rich tapestry of life: a social and cultural history: i didn't do this course, but I think it takes a thematic approach and it covers the early modern period..it looks at witchcraft, manners and err other stuff lol. It's taught by Sandra Cavallo and Hugo Blake
    Leaders of the 20th Century: leaders in the non western world: Here you study people such as nelson mandela, saddam hussein etc. (I didn't do this one either, so have no clue what it's about. Have no clue who it's taught by!!

    In the gateways, you have to do two essays (formative) a term for each, which doesn't count towards your final 1st year grade, but you have to do them to complete the year. Additionally, you have to do presentations on a lecture topic, which you can do in pairs I think. Over the easter holidays you have to complete an essay (assessed) for each of your gateways which goes toward your 1st year grade. You will get given a list of titles to choose from, which are similar to the things you have covered during the academic year. You will not get given a reading list for this, as you can use the one you were given for the course at the start of the year, and there's lots of books to choose from in the library anyway!! The assessed essay is worth 30%, and the exam is worth 70%. However, the Leaders in the 20th century does not have an exam, but instead has 2 courseworks to be completed over the easter, as well as presentations through out the course. You're also expected to contribute in seminars to discussions (I never did for republics, as I had no clue what to say apart from the basics..I probably should have read the books properly instead of skimming them, but you live and learn!!)

    When I say "counts towards your first year", I don't mean that your 1st year counts towards your degree. You only have to pass the first year - 40% - but say if you wanted to apply for an internship somewhere during the summer hols, getting a 2.1 or a 1st would be a lot better, plus you need 40% to carry onto your second year.

    The Foundation courses are split up into a few areas:
    1) Doing History Part 1 (taken in term 1, worth 0.5 unit)
    2) Doing History Part 2 (taken in term 2, worth 0.5 unit)
    3) History and Meanings (taken in term 1, worth 0.5 unit)
    4) The Material World (taken in term 2, worth 0.5 unit)
    5) Economic History (taken in term 2 in place of either 'doing history part 1' or 'material world', worth 0.5 unit)
    6) Latin for Historians (taken in terms 1 and 2, and in term 2 you either don't do 'doing history part 2' or 'material world', worth 0.5 unit *I think*)

    You have to do 4 half units if I'm adding up correctly, but this depends on whether you're doing joint honours or straight degree.


    I vaguely remember the doing histories consist of about 10 lectures on different topics, but you spend 2 weeks on one topic, and have one seminar on each topic. For example, I think the first two lectures were on "Saints cults and their relics", and then after the first lecture, half of the year would have their seminar with the lecturer and the teaching assistants, and the next week the lecture on this topic would continue, and the other half of the year would have their seminar after that with the lecturer and the teaching assistant. You would then have to do some reading for the seminar, possibly ahead of the lecture depending on when your seminar was, and discuss that in the group. For each topic you would have an essay to do (1000 words an essay) which is in a booklet you get given for each course, so for 'doing history part 1' you would have 5 essays to do, and I think the deadline is the end of term, but it's better to do them as you go along I think, so they're fresh in your mind, rather than end up with a big pile of essays to do at the end when you can't even remember stuff from the lecture, but whatever works for you!! (Plus the library doesn't always have the books specified in the reading list, so you may have to go elsewhere, and there's always a last minute dash for books!!) I think the aim here is to familiarise yourself with different type of historical sources e.g. domestic spaces/interiors, paintings, photographic images, inventories, government papers and such like (will make more sense when you do it, I guarantee!!) These courses are taught by various lecturers of the department.

    History and meanings - you have about 10 lectures and you then choose one essay to do in the booklet given to you, with a reading list provided. Every other week you have seminars with the pHD students vaguely relating to the lectures. Some people didn't bother to turn up to all the lectures, and got their friends to sign them in as they didnt see the point in coming if you only had to do one essay, but in the 3rd year you have to re-visit history and meanings, so i wouldn't advise bunking, however annoying the 9am lecture on a friday is!! All I can remember from the course content is looking at feminism, anthropology, the invention of the footnote and something to do with Herodotus. It's taught by Penny Corfield, who is so lovely!!!

    The Material World - consisted of lectures on the world around us, (buildings, food, religion, bones and other stuff I can't remember as I don't think I read most of the lecture notes as towards the end they didn't seem relevant..I took my laptops to lectures and went online!! Lots of other people did this too, lol..and made notes for their other courses) and a trip to Guildford in which we had to identify various buildings, what period they dated from, what they were made of and their geographical location (this was a test btw, partly done in pairs or threes, then an individual one marked by our friends..hmm lol). There was also a group project (about 5 people in a group..and you couldn't do it with your friends, you were all randomly chosen by the lecturer))- everyone had to unit under one particular object or theme, something to do with being important historically I think it was or having some sort of impact. Everyone had to do an individual essay (2000 words) and it then had to be put together as though it were one long dissertation type essay (so it would then be about 10,000). Additionally, the group then has to do a powerpoint presentation on their topic. (My group's went so badly wrong, but was hilarious!!) This course is done by Hugo Blake

    I didn't study economic history so I have no clue about this foundation course!!

    Didn't do latin either, but from what I gather, you do various exercises in a text book, learn grammar etc. much like you would a language in school. You do have an exam for this, I think it may be a translation, but don't quote me on that!!

    You don't have exams for any foundation course, it is all coursework, apart from latin which is assessed by examination

    Someone correct me if I'm wrong about anything..
    Well explained Hana!!
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    (Original post by Empyreal Rhapsody)
    Do you know whether it is possible for somebody doing Ancient History to transfer over to History (V100)?
    im sure it is if its possibe for me to transfer from biology (they said it might be okay)
    but um, it seemed to me that History does some ancient history anyways.. i think?
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    Haha, Rozaroo!! She is so nice!! However I'm not doing her course next year... Have to say, Material World was *the* worst course ever..pointless too, but never mind. I'll put it down as an experience ;-) Wonder how many people are doing archaeology next year?

    Hello Martha!!!!! I am a little saddo who spends too long online sometimes :P Haven't seen you rattling around here before!

    Oh crap, has anyone else (i.e. Roz, Martha and other historians) thought about their independent essay yet?
 
 
 
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