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feminist and marxist readings watch

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    I'm studying a2 biology, maths, history, french and english next year. my summer work foir english is to research women and language and find some marxist quotes because i'm studying toni morrison. can anyone reccomend me any books or do you have any useful quotes?
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    (Original post by little_melanie)
    I'm studying a2 biology, maths, history, french and english next year. my summer work foir english is to research women and language and find some marxist quotes because i'm studying toni morrison. can anyone reccomend me any books or do you have any useful quotes?

    Well it really depends on what text you are trying to apply these theorists to. Ok well Marxism and Feminism are two totally different things.

    There is a quote in my mind that has stuck there from a few months ago which was said by Simone de Beauvoir who said "One is not born but rather, becomes a woman" but that is a feminism quote from her work on The Second Sex

    You could try asking the English Literature Society of UKL who can probably answer Marxism better than I becuase ive dealt mainly with feminist theorists.

    Here is the link...

    http://www.uk-learning.net/t45144.html
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    (Original post by little_melanie)
    I'm studying a2 biology, maths, history, french and english next year. my summer work foir english is to research women and language and find some marxist quotes because i'm studying toni morrison. can anyone reccomend me any books or do you have any useful quotes?

    Okay I've searched my old English Lit folder and found you some quotes, I applied most of them to Rhys 'Wide Sargasso Sea' but they're applicable to most text:

    Women and Language:

    ‘Women, deprived of words are deprived of life’
    – Andrea Dworkin, Letters from a War Zone, 1993

    ‘The words we speak situate us in our gender and our class’
    - Cora Kaplan in Language and Gender in Literature and the modern world, Walder, 1990

    ‘Women must write her self: must write about women and bring women to writing, from which they have been driven away as violently as from their bodies…’
    - Helene Cixous in the Laugh of Medusa in Literature and the Modern World.

    And from Aristotle whom I used to love very much:

    ‘The female is a female by virtue of a certain lack of qualities….we should regard the female nature as afflicted with a natural defectiveness.’
    Simone de Beauvoir “Women and the Other’ in Literature in the Modrn world

    ‘She is the incidental, the inessential, as opposed to the essential. He is the subject, he is the absolute – she is the Other.’
    Simone de Beauvoir “Women and the Other’ in Literature in the Modern world

    Hope that helps because my fingers are hurting from typing
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    The standard reading on marxism is the communist manifesto by Karl Marx. there is also a book called the unhappy marriage of marxism and femisim - prob not in print anymore.

    MB
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    Marxism Reading, Secondary Material:

    'Religion is the opium of the people/masses (can't remember?!) Karl Marx - most obvious quote, Toni Morrisons' characters tend to belong in a religious community.

    'All art Springs from an ideological conception of the world; there is no such thing...as a work of art entirely devoid of ideological context' Terry Eagleton, 'Marxist Criticism' in Literature and the Modern World, 1990.

    Often certain characters have strong materialistic values and are blinded by the dream of capitalist success so much so that they forget the real material conditions of their existence and the alienation of their experience. It's best to pick out relevant quotes from 'The Communist Manifesto' and read some of Morrison's own essays on her work to increase your understanding. Look at the text as a way in which false consciousness of capitalist ideology is exposed.
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    (Original post by waiting2smile)
    Marxism Reading, Secondary Material:

    'Religion is the opium of the people/masses (can't remember?!) Karl Marx - most obvious quote, Toni Morrisons' characters tend to belong in a religious community.

    'All art Springs from an ideological conception of the world; there is no such thing...as a work of art entirely devoid of ideological context' Terry Eagleton, 'Marxist Criticism' in Literature and the Modern World, 1990.

    Often certain characters have strong materialistic values and are blinded by the dream of capitalist success so much so that they forget the real material conditions of their existence and the alienation of their experience. It's best to pick out relevant quotes from 'The Communist Manifesto' and read some of Morrison's own essays on her work to increase your understanding. Look at the text as a way in which false consciousness of capitalist ideology is exposed.
    thanks VERY much for the help, can you give me any of the titles of Morrison's essays and have you used that as secondary material in your work, if so how seeing as you also did the song od solomon TIA.
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    (Original post by little_melanie)
    thanks VERY much for the help, can you give me any of the titles of Morrison's essays and have you used that as secondary material in your work, if so how seeing as you also did the song od solomon TIA.
    I've only looked at one particular essay of Morrisons and most of my essays have been comparative work. The essay which would be more suited to 'The Song of Solomon' is her essay 'Rootedness: The Ancestor as Foundation'. Don't panic integrating secondary material within your essay is easy - practise makes perfect. I'm going to quickly demostrate:

    The ending of Song of Solomon doubtless categorises why it is a more a novel of ‘hope’ rather than ‘despair’. It is a moving and extremely poetic ending with supposed flight; it reflects the same enigmatic beginning of Robert Smiths attempted flight that gives the narrative a cyclical feel. It is unsatisfactory for readers who prefer a definite end to novels however it does tie up all the major issues raised as well as brings a sense of closure. In her essay ‘Rootedness’ Morrison asserts ‘I have to provide the places and spaces so that the reader can participate’ thus she leaves it up to the reader to decide whether Milkman dies or flies. It is difficult for the reader to define a conclusive end to Milkman’s fate because of Morrison’s use of magical realism. The reader is aware that human flight is impossible but Morrison has interwoven the impossible within reality, one must accept it as reality in the world of the novel. Morrison’s very matter of fact tone through the use of short blunt sentences to punctuate her narrative makes the events more realistic.

    It sounds quite rushed because I've just done it now but there you go (pretty good if I say so - I've talked about language, structure, and used a secondary quote in one paragraph!). Read the essay, highlight an interesting quote, find a relevant extract in the text, and apply it. Song of Solomon is one of my favourite texts so if you need any more help PM me.
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    (Original post by waiting2smile)
    I've only looked at one particular essay of Morrisons and most of my essays have been comparative work. The essay which would be more suited to 'The Song of Solomon' is her essay 'Rootedness: The Ancestor as Foundation'. Don't panic integrating secondary material within your essay is easy - practise makes perfect. I'm going to quickly demostrate:

    The ending of Song of Solomon doubtless categorises why it is a more a novel of ‘hope’ rather than ‘despair’. It is a moving and extremely poetic ending with supposed flight; it reflects the same enigmatic beginning of Robert Smiths attempted flight that gives the narrative a cyclical feel. It is unsatisfactory for readers who prefer a definite end to novels however it does tie up all the major issues raised as well as brings a sense of closure. In her essay ‘Rootedness’ Morrison asserts ‘I have to provide the places and spaces so that the reader can participate’ thus she leaves it up to the reader to decide whether Milkman dies or flies. It is difficult for the reader to define a conclusive end to Milkman’s fate because of Morrison’s use of magical realism. The reader is aware that human flight is impossible but Morrison has interwoven the impossible within reality, one must accept it as reality in the world of the novel. Morrison’s very matter of fact tone through the use of short blunt sentences to punctuate her narrative makes the events more realistic.

    It sounds quite rushed because I've just done it now but there you go (pretty good if I say so - I've talked about language, structure, and used a secondary quote in one paragraph!). Read the essay, highlight an interesting quote, find a relevant extract in the text, and apply it. Song of Solomon is one of my favourite texts so if you need any more help PM me.
    wow thanks would you say the protagonist has achieved a sense of self towards the end?
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    (Original post by little_melanie)
    wow thanks would you say the protagonist has achieved a sense of self towards the end?
    Yeah I guess, as he's no longer so selfish having given up his egocentricity. I suppose you could say he's found his 'self' when he discerns ‘it did not matter which one of them would give up his ghost in the killing arms of his brother’. Thus whether he dies or flies is not vital, except the fact he has achieved his goal of reaching self identity.
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    ...Are you a budding Rosa Luxembourg? :confused:
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    ...Are you a budding Rosa Luxembourg? :confused:
    Who's the comment aimed at?
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    (Original post by waiting2smile)
    Who's the comment aimed at?
    The thread starter primarily, and any other (misguided) individual who subscribes to the two said doctrines.
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    The thread starter primarily, and any other (misguided) individual who subscribes to the two said doctrines.
    Misguided? :mad:

    *Throws a brick at you too*
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    (Original post by waiting2smile)
    Misguided? :mad:

    *Throws a brick at you too*
    Save your feminist fervour until the near future - we could use you if there is ever a major war (and all the menfolk are slain).

    Good day
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    Save your feminist fervour until the near future - we could use you if there is ever a major war (and all the menfolk are slain).

    Good day
    Ha! Who said I was a feminist? There you go a typical male making quick reckless deductions :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by waiting2smile)
    Ha! Who said I was a feminist? There you go a typical male making quick reckless deductions :rolleyes:
    Then why take issue with my sentiments? I didn't just come up with them for the fun of it, you know, they were arrived at due to divine inspiration.
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    Then why take issue with my sentiments? I didn't just come up with them for the fun of it, you know, they were arrived at due to divine inspiration.
    I see, well I wouldn't want to interrupt your extraordinary schooling so I'll leave you to it... :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by waiting2smile)
    I see, well I wouldn't want to interrupt your extraordinary schooling so I'll leave you to it... :rolleyes:
    Very well; a wise choice.
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    Very well; a wise choice.
    Do you know you've managed to successfully hijack someones thread. Well done.
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    (Original post by waiting2smile)
    Yeah I guess, as he's no longer so selfish having given up his egocentricity. I suppose you could say he's found his 'self' when he discerns ‘it did not matter which one of them would give up his ghost in the killing arms of his brother’. Thus whether he dies or flies is not vital, except the fact he has achieved his goal of reaching self identity.
    thank you for all the help you've given me, you're v. clver and nice also very quickly what do the birds represent in the last passage apart from flight? thanks
 
 
 

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