I'm a (small-c) conservative liberal-socialist. Am I just indecisive? Watch

AlexanderHam
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The basis of my political views are that the means of production fundamentally belong in public ownership, and also have a profound belief in the importance of trade unions and the advantages of syndicalism in some areas of the economy (like the finance industry, surprisingly). At the very least, "means of production" in the modern age should encompass all utilities, public transport, telecom/internet backbone etc. Anything that is a natural monopoly should be in public ownership, at the very least, and that free markets in any particular sector is a dispensation that should last only so long as it benefits society, not as an end in itself.

I add the liberal tag to my socialism in that I believe it's undoubtedly true that some goods and services are better delivered by the private sector; I don't think the public sector needs to get involved in building smartphones or running supermarkets. And I'm liberal insofar as I believe people should be able to do what they want viz. drugs, prostitution... when it comes to your own body, other people should not be able to tell you what to do.

I'm small-c conservative descriptor to my liberal-socialism in the sense that I'm strongly patriotic, I believe our institutions have served us well in many ways, that the Anglo-American civilisation has thrived by adhering to the rule of law and representative democratic principles. Not to be too jingoistic, but I believe it's demonstrably true that the Anglo-American civilisation is the most superior one currently in existence (except possibly the Scandinavian civilisation; they are also quite advanced).

Are these various political ideas a sign of indecision, or is it that I've broken free of the shackles of ideology and I've lived long enough and read widely enough to get a sense of what I like, of what works, and take a bit from each ideological genus?
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Malfunction
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You're a one nation conservative with American libertarian/liberal tendencies.

It sounds like a contradiction but it really isnt. Your ideas are 'centrist' and 'pragmatic' (gods I hate those terms).

You are just a one nation conservative for a new age.
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Scottish Person
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(Original post by AlexanderHam)
The basis of my political views are that the means of production fundamentally belong in public ownership, and also have a profound belief in the importance of trade unions and the advantages of syndicalism in some areas of the economy (like the finance industry, surprisingly). At the very least, "means of production" in the modern age should encompass all utilities, public transport, telecom/internet backbone etc. Anything that is a natural monopoly should be in public ownership, at the very least, and that free markets in any particular sector is a dispensation that should last only so long as it benefits society, not as an end in itself.

I add the liberal tag to my socialism in that I believe it's undoubtedly true that some goods and services are better delivered by the private sector; I don't think the public sector needs to get involved in building smartphones or running supermarkets. And I'm liberal insofar as I believe people should be able to do what they want viz. drugs, prostitution... when it comes to your own body, other people should not be able to tell you what to do.

I'm small-c conservative descriptor to my liberal-socialism in the sense that I'm strongly patriotic, I believe our institutions have served us well in many ways, that the Anglo-American civilisation has thrived by adhering to the rule of law and representative democratic principles. Not to be too jingoistic, but I believe it's demonstrably true that the Anglo-American civilisation is the most superior one currently in existence (except possibly the Scandinavian civilisation; they are also quite advanced).

Are these various political ideas a sign of indecision, or is it that I've broken free of the shackles of ideology and I've lived long enough and read widely enough to get a sense of what I like, of what works, and take a bit from each ideological genus?
Not indecisive you are just not bound to political tribalism.

I'd like to think most people have complex ideologies and this is why labels are often unhelpful as it lumps you in with a crowd. For example I assume if people read the definition of Feminist most people would consider themselves Feminists but the label is under a lot of flak because of the alleged Misandrists that use the term Feminist. I find that talking to my friends from across the political spectrum I can find common ground on certain topics no matter what they self identify as and absolutely disagree with people I thought were on the same wavelength with everything.

I could claim that I am both authoritarian and also liberal. For example: I believe that public smoking should be banned and that there should be a total ban of guns which is allegedly against "freedom", I also believe in huge fines for those that avoid taxes and harm the environment. However on the other side I also believe that people should be free to do whatever they want so long as it doesn't harm others. Whether it is smoking cannabis or LGBTQ rights I am all for, if there are any problems such as increased cannabis smoking people should be encouraged to quit not forced to. I would call this responsible freedom, although I'm sure many would disagree.
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AlexanderHam
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(Original post by Malfunction)
You're a one nation conservative with American libertarian/liberal tendencies.

It sounds like a contradiction but it really isnt. Your ideas are 'centrist' and 'pragmatic' (gods I hate those terms).

You are just a one nation conservative for a new age.
That's quite a good way of looking at it. I am reflexively conservative in that I'm skeptical of change when it comes to institutions, but I have a one nation conservative's concern for the working-classes and mitigating the harshness of capitalism. Although my "free market dispensationalism", for want of a better word, does come more (ideologically) from a socialist perspective (but from a pragmatic perspective, a centrist "do what works" one)
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Cato the Elder
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You sound like a socially liberal One-Nation Conservative/Burkean conservative.
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Davij038
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(Original post by AlexanderHam)
That's quite a good way of looking at it. I am reflexively conservative in that I'm skeptical of change when it comes to institutions, but I have a one nation conservative's concern for the working-classes and mitigating the harshness of capitalism. Although my "free market dispensationalism", for want of a better word, does come more (ideologically) from a socialist perspective (but from a pragmatic perspective, a centrist "do what works" one)
Have you tried this?

http://www.abtirsi.com/quiz2.php

Might give you a less confusing description of your politics
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Rakas21
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(Original post by AlexanderHam)
The basis of my political views are that the means of production fundamentally belong in public ownership, and also have a profound belief in the importance of trade unions and the advantages of syndicalism in some areas of the economy (like the finance industry, surprisingly). At the very least, "means of production" in the modern age should encompass all utilities, public transport, telecom/internet backbone etc. Anything that is a natural monopoly should be in public ownership, at the very least, and that free markets in any particular sector is a dispensation that should last only so long as it benefits society, not as an end in itself.

I add the liberal tag to my socialism in that I believe it's undoubtedly true that some goods and services are better delivered by the private sector; I don't think the public sector needs to get involved in building smartphones or running supermarkets. And I'm liberal insofar as I believe people should be able to do what they want viz. drugs, prostitution... when it comes to your own body, other people should not be able to tell you what to do.

I'm small-c conservative descriptor to my liberal-socialism in the sense that I'm strongly patriotic, I believe our institutions have served us well in many ways, that the Anglo-American civilisation has thrived by adhering to the rule of law and representative democratic principles. Not to be too jingoistic, but I believe it's demonstrably true that the Anglo-American civilisation is the most superior one currently in existence (except possibly the Scandinavian civilisation; they are also quite advanced).

Are these various political ideas a sign of indecision, or is it that I've broken free of the shackles of ideology and I've lived long enough and read widely enough to get a sense of what I like, of what works, and take a bit from each ideological genus?
Assuming you want to see co-operative type structures in those public bodies rather than direct government control then i'd say that your simply a nationalist social democrat.

Personally i think it indicates that your pragmatic and open minded and your obviously well read.

I suspect that right now your between Farron and May rather than anywhere near Labour.
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sleepysnooze
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I think you're inflating the label "conservative" somewhat
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username878267
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Assuming you want to see co-operative type structures in those public bodies rather than direct government control then i'd say that your simply a nationalist social democrat.

Personally i think it indicates that your pragmatic and open minded and your obviously well read.

I suspect that right now your between Farron and May rather than anywhere near Labour.
Not at all. He's a social democrat. May is a populist and Farron is an ardent economic liberal.

Unless you think May wants stronger unions and more nationalisation.
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yudothis
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(Original post by AlexanderHam)
The basis of my political views are that the means of production fundamentally belong in public ownership, and also have a profound belief in the importance of trade unions and the advantages of syndicalism in some areas of the economy (like the finance industry, surprisingly). At the very least, "means of production" in the modern age should encompass all utilities, public transport, telecom/internet backbone etc. Anything that is a natural monopoly should be in public ownership, at the very least, and that free markets in any particular sector is a dispensation that should last only so long as it benefits society, not as an end in itself.

I add the liberal tag to my socialism in that I believe it's undoubtedly true that some goods and services are better delivered by the private sector; I don't think the public sector needs to get involved in building smartphones or running supermarkets. And I'm liberal insofar as I believe people should be able to do what they want viz. drugs, prostitution... when it comes to your own body, other people should not be able to tell you what to do.

I'm small-c conservative descriptor to my liberal-socialism in the sense that I'm strongly patriotic, I believe our institutions have served us well in many ways, that the Anglo-American civilisation has thrived by adhering to the rule of law and representative democratic principles. Not to be too jingoistic, but I believe it's demonstrably true that the Anglo-American civilisation is the most superior one currently in existence (except possibly the Scandinavian civilisation; they are also quite advanced).

Are these various political ideas a sign of indecision, or is it that I've broken free of the shackles of ideology and I've lived long enough and read widely enough to get a sense of what I like, of what works, and take a bit from each ideological genus?
After centuries of exploitation that is still ongoing. You have raw minerals, nice, let our companies get rich and your governments rich from corruption.
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JamesManc
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Liberalism had led to the decline of Anglo-American culture which you so admire.
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username2228735
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(Original post by JamesManc)
Liberalism had led to the decline of Anglo-American culture which you so admire.
Regressive liberalism has; classical liberalism, in its purest form, does not mean cultural abolition. Adam Smith, for example, would never have agreed to reckless transnational organisations managing the factors of production.
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yudothis
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(Original post by Aceadria)
Regressive liberalism has; classical liberalism, in its purest form, does not mean cultural abolition. Adam Smith, for example, would never have agreed to reckless transnational organisations managing the factors of production.
Some might call it progressive liberalism
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Bornblue)
Not at all. He's a social democrat. May is a populist and Farron is an ardent economic liberal.

Unless you think May wants stronger unions and more nationalisation.
A world in which Farron is an economic liberal (let alone an ardent one) is one in which i've not yet woke up in.
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username878267
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(Original post by Rakas21)
A world in which Farron is an economic liberal (let alone an ardent one) is one in which i've not yet woke up in.
Of course he is. Hence his EU love.
That whole bunch of Lib Dems are economic liberals.
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ChaoticButterfly
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You're a special snowflake is what you are.

Just to throw my bit in syndicalism is at odds with one nation conservatism (which is basically feudalism for the capitalist age). Syndicalism is all about giving control to the serfs and sharing out power. One nation toryism is about having a very rigid class based society but where the upper classes looks after the the ones at the bottom to an extent. But ultimate the working class stay as the working class and must do what they are told.

To be honest syndicalism is at odds with most of the other stuff you just just defined yourself as. Although I think you are taking the good bits (as you see it) of various ideologies and applying them when you think they will work. All pick and mix.
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username2228735
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(Original post by yudothis)
Some might call it progressive liberalism
Indeed but such individuals may require a history lesson.
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yudothis
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(Original post by Aceadria)
Indeed but such individuals may require a history lesson.
Oh I think they are very well versed in history.
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username2228735
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(Original post by yudothis)
Oh I think they are very well versed in history.
Clearly not.
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anosmianAcrimony
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You're not indecisive, you're nuanced.
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