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    havent seen people talking about it much, but just wondering are there any people out there who do muay thai?
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    lol ive done a bit, I know the basic kicks i forgot the punch combos and how to protect. I really want to do some MMA, going to have to find out if they do it somehwere in sheffield when I go uni
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    (Original post by harvie_316)
    lol ive done a bit, I know the basic kicks i forgot the punch combos and how to protect. I really want to do some MMA, going to have to find out if they do it somehwere in sheffield when I go uni
    Done Muay Thai for a couple of months, but I usually watch videos and practice alone. Then I attend sessions and get feedback.

    Recently I went to the MMA session at the same gym and i got really scared. The guys weren't really that big but they had such animosity. I'm not a very aggressive person, so I was pretty sure they'd kill me. The manouvres also look difficult.
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    I do muay thai, it's the most agressive and brutal fighting style I've ever done (bar MMA, which I've not had the pleasure to try). It's certainly not for the nancy-pancy "snap-kickers". I think, even with only 2 years of training, that I could beat up a conventional martial artist, simply because I'd be on their ass so hard they wouldn't know what hit them.
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    I do MMA. What's so brutal/scary about it? Maybe I don't do proper MMA.
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    My Polish mate who i work with has been doing it for years, and is really good at it. Im thinking about getting into it, but I am considering doing martial arts instead.
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    Muay Thai Is certainly one of the most effective martial arts styles out there. MMA too. but answering Empyreal Rhapsody's question. I guess it depends who you train with. Because when I attended the session, the guys were really going at it. The plywood barriers had huge dents too. It kinda unnerved me, but I'm still willing to have a go.
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    It depends on who attends the class to be honest. You're more likely to find a bunch of dedicated professional and ameteur fighters in an MMA class than in a traditional martial arts class. MMA is a sport so the guys in your class are likely to be quite intense.

    I've been doing Muay Thai for a few months, I'm just trying to improve my conditioning before I start going to classes again in September. CV fitness is the single most important requirement for Muay Thai - On some occasions, I felt like hurling after the warmup! Quite frankly, Muay Thai fights scare me, I would much rather compete in MMA, where on average you don't get hit as much!
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    Ah, well... I dunno. When we spar we use fourteen ounce gloves, so the most you'll normally get is a bloody nose and a headache; at worst it'll be a broken nose.
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    Been interested recently in picking up a martial art of some sort, did taekwondo many years ago, but I'd prefer something more functional with real world application if I ever have to defend myself so I'm leaning towards kickboxing/muay thai. Is 19 years old too old to start, essentially from scratch?
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    No way, that sort of age is a great time to start! Much younger than that and you're just too weak (in terms of both issuing pain and receiving it) to really get anywhere. I mean yeah, kids can practice martial arts, but it's usually a karate type affair -- you stand in a line, kick and punch the air and shout "eyuuuuuuuuurgh!" at the top of your pre-pubescent lungs. It's essentially a dance lesson.

    Once you're over the 18-ish mark you can start sparring properly. Considering that you said that you're seeking to be adept at defending yourself, sparring is very important, as you (gradually/painstakingly) learn to handle yourself whilst under fire. You could spend your entire life doing kata and pummeling focus pads, but all of this becomes useless when you've got a big drunk ******* windmilling towards you with his sovereigned club-hands flailing wildly.
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    (Original post by Pav27)
    Been interested recently in picking up a martial art of some sort, did taekwondo many years ago, but I'd prefer something more functional with real world application if I ever have to defend myself so I'm leaning towards kickboxing/muay thai. Is 19 years old too old to start, essentially from scratch?
    Nope, its fine to start at 19, im 17 and I only have a few months under the belt. Muay Thai unlike many martial arts does not involve very complex moves which take years of development. Im very good and like I said been only at it for a few months. But its partly due to my keen interest which forces me to practice when its possible. The only difficult thing is to master the signature "tree chop" kick. But a lot of bag work fixes this. Muay Thai needs quite a good amount of power so at 19 you have developed well enough to pack a devastating punch. And yea, taekwondo is a very ambitious style, you'd have to both daring and very especially gifted to use it effectively.

    Start ASAP! You'll enjoy it!
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    Ju-jitsu and Muay thai is the best combo.
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    19 Ain't to late.

    I started training MMA at 19 that was two years ago and everything is going fine.
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    do boxing, thai is crap........ not really, but forget knees and elbows to the face!!
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    I've started Krav Maga after 10 years of Karate (I'm 18 now so nearly fully developed with my physique) and i have to say that with an experienced Krav Maga practitioner and an experienced Muay Thai practitioner the Krav Maga guy is going to come out on top.

    And Karate training wasn't easy towards the later half either, got really pushed and the instructors felt that i can take full contact training. It was worth it though for all those extra hours because they really improved my core strength and striking ability.
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    (Original post by YL_LDN)
    I've started Krav Maga after 10 years of Karate (I'm 18 now so nearly fully developed with my physique) and i have to say that with an experienced Krav Maga practitioner and an experienced Muay Thai practitioner the Krav Maga guy is going to come out on top.
    How do you think you know this exactly?

    Also nice way to bump old thread.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    How do you think you know this exactly?

    Also nice way to bump old thread.
    Muay Thai wasn't designed to be a killing art to the extent of Krav Maga which was made for the Israeli IDF. With Krav Maga a fight to the death was what the inventor had in mind so with that the most dirtiest and lethal abilities available to the human body were utilised. Sure Muay Thai is an exceptional martial art but it also lacks groundwork and wrestling abilities that other martial arts teach. And most real fights end up on the ground.
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    (Original post by YL_LDN)
    Muay Thai wasn't designed to be a killing art to the extent of Krav Maga which was made for the Israeli IDF. With Krav Maga a fight to the death was what the inventor had in mind so with that the most dirtiest and lethal abilities available to the human body were utilised. Sure Muay Thai is an exceptional martial art but it also lacks groundwork and wrestling abilities that other martial arts teach. And most real fights end up on the ground.
    Krav Maga isn't designed as a killing art it's designed to neutralize the enemy.

    You can't say who would win, it's about the skill of the people involved in the fight.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Krav Maga isn't designed as a killing art it's designed to neutralize the enemy.

    You can't say who would win, it's about the skill of the people involved in the fight.

    I said extent, i don't think Muay Thai is meant to neutralize the enemy much either because i can easily kill with a lot of their techniques.
 
 
 
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