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    Can anyone who is doing or has done A-Level tell me how they're learning all their vocab and grammar, and any advice generally? Any help or information on anything to do with the subject is appreciated! I'm finding the set text a nightmare (Tacitus Annals 1, 16-30) but am looking forward to starting Virgil next term.
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    (Original post by Aear)
    Can anyone who is doing or has done A-Level tell me how they're learning all their vocab and grammar, and any advice generally? Any help or information on anything to do with the subject is appreciated! I'm finding the set text a nightmare (Tacitus Annals 1, 16-30) but am looking forward to starting Virgil next term.
    I'm also doing the Tacitus Text Ch16-30 and I definitely agree! I certainly prefer the language side over the literature. So with language, I use a site called quizlet where you can type in the vocab you're leaning from the vocab list, and then it allows you to test yourself in different ways, definitely recommend it! With the grammar, I don't really revise it but I think by doing translations in class helps to reinforce my knowledge. At the moment I'm trying to find ways to tackle the impossible set text :s

    What other A-Levels are you taking?
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    (Original post by purpleday32)
    I'm also doing the Tacitus Text Ch16-30 and I definitely agree! I certainly prefer the language side over the literature. So with language, I use a site called quizlet where you can type in the vocab you're leaning from the vocab list, and then it allows you to test yourself in different ways, definitely recommend it! With the grammar, I don't really revise it but I think by doing translations in class helps to reinforce my knowledge. At the moment I'm trying to find ways to tackle the impossible set text :s

    What other A-Levels are you taking?
    How have you been taught the Tacitus? We were given each paragraph, with larger ones split up into smaller sections, in Latin, and then a table with a small amount of the Latin in one box on the left and a very loose English translation on the right. I find this method insanely hard to learn from, especially with the English being so liberal I have to retranslate the whole thing so I know what word applies to what and not remove or add words. My teacher adores the set text, and its scant writing style; I can't see how.

    Lord, do I hate Tacitus.

    One thing that I find that helps is a website called 'wiktionary', where you can enter any Latin word, and it tells you exactly what it is grammatically. Type any verb in there and you'll see how amazing it is.

    I'm having a look at quizlet now, and it looks very useful. Thanks for that!

    My other A Levels are Maths, History, and Government and Politics. What about you?
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    (Original post by Aear)
    How have you been taught the Tacitus? We were given each paragraph, with larger ones split up into smaller sections, in Latin, and then a table with a small amount of the Latin in one box on the left and a very loose English translation on the right. I find this method insanely hard to learn from, especially with the English being so liberal I have to retranslate the whole thing so I know what word applies to what and not remove or add words. My teacher adores the set text, and its scant writing style; I can't see how.

    Lord, do I hate Tacitus.

    One thing that I find that helps is a website called 'wiktionary', where you can enter any Latin word, and it tells you exactly what it is grammatically. Type any verb in there and you'll see how amazing it is.

    I'm having a look at quizlet now, and it looks very useful. Thanks for that!

    My other A Levels are Maths, History, and Government and Politics. What about you?

    We are learning the Tacitus in a similar way: We cut out and stick in 3 or 4 lines of Latin onto a notepad and we write the English translation on the next page and we also write brief notes on the style by annotating around the Latin.

    Yes the English translation is also difficult which makes the set text even harder to learn! I guess I'll just have to resort to rote-learning the whole thing. Thankfully for our mock after Xmas there will be no Tacitus, just language...

    I use Wiktionary too! I've literally given up on using Latin dictionaries as they don't have every Latin word in so it's the most useful thing for translations. Also for quizlet, as you might have already discovered, you can search for AS vocab lists on there already done by other people which you can use for learning vocab instead of typing out all 500 words or whatever!

    That's an interesting choice of A Levels! I'm doing Latin, French, Psychology, Italian and EPQ.
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    (Original post by purpleday32)
    We are learning the Tacitus in a similar way: We cut out and stick in 3 or 4 lines of Latin onto a notepad and we write the English translation on the next page and we also write brief notes on the style by annotating around the Latin.

    Yes the English translation is also difficult which makes the set text even harder to learn! I guess I'll just have to resort to rote-learning the whole thing. Thankfully for our mock after Xmas there will be no Tacitus, just language...

    I use Wiktionary too! I've literally given up on using Latin dictionaries as they don't have every Latin word in so it's the most useful thing for translations. Also for quizlet, as you might have already discovered, you can search for AS vocab lists on there already done by other people which you can use for learning vocab instead of typing out all 500 words or whatever!

    That's an interesting choice of A Levels! I'm doing Latin, French, Psychology, Italian and EPQ.
    On that Tacitus, by a stunning coincidence, because our previous Latin teacher left last year, he gave myself and a friend a bunch of blank set texts (those fantastic booklets), and one from 2008 was the very Tacitus we're doing now (going up to 33 however). We gave it to our teacher, who is going to photocopy useful parts of it, which hopefully includes the translation they have. If you want, I can try and get hold of some scanned images and send them to you. Or see if your school, provided it doesn't throw away the booklets, if you even know what I'm talking about, has a copy; it had a purple cover, if that helps.

    3 languages for A-Level? How have you not already been crushed? And an EPQ? Any idea on what you'd want to do it on? I'm considering doing mine either developing a conlang (constructed language) if I can, or, as a backup, something on philosophy, preferably epistemology (the branch concerned with what is and how we get knowledge, and how it works), in a poem, if I can! It's being to be fun waffling in either.
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    Moved to the classics forum - lots of threads about taking Latin here
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    Hi, I'm teaching the Tacitus set text this year for the 1st year students of the new reformed specification. What I find works best with my students to translate the text is to break it down into smaller chunks which they translate roughly for homework. We then go through a better translation in class and look at stylistic points. About once every half term, we have a short test on a section done in that half term which asks them to (a) translate a bit of the chunk and (b) comment on the rest of it.

    Unfortunately, it really is a case of just learning the text really well, both in terms of knowing your translation and also the stylistic elements, since that's where most of the marks are to be found.

    There are a few resources which I can recommend if anyone's interested, so by all means PM me and I'll see what I can find.
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    I have been using Memrise which is like quizlet, but personally I find memrise makes me actually learn it a lot better.

    http://www.memrise.com/course/121927...h443-from-220/

    Set text is such a bugger - I am the only person doing Latin A level so I have nobody to bemoan it to!
    Good luck in your tests
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    (Original post by maddieacpope)
    I have been using Memrise which is like quizlet, but personally I find memrise makes me actually learn it a lot better.

    http://www.memrise.com/course/121927...h443-from-220/

    Set text is such a bugger - I am the only person doing Latin A level so I have nobody to bemoan it to!
    Good luck in your tests
    You're not a proper latinist if you don't use memrise.
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    (Original post by Aear)
    Can anyone who is doing or has done A-Level tell me how they're learning all their vocab and grammar, and any advice generally? Any help or information on anything to do with the subject is appreciated! I'm finding the set text a nightmare (Tacitus Annals 1, 16-30) but am looking forward to starting Virgil next term.


    I've been using memrise for learning vocab - it's honestly a blessing from higher powers. GOTTA LOVE MEMRISE.

    As for grammar... Well.... I'm not! I've made a mini booklet of all the endings I need to learn, and I try randomly chanting them. That's about it.

    And for the literature, I highlight the phrases in Latin and English so they match. I number the word order. I record myself listening to it. I read it to memorise the english so the Latin follows. But nothing seems to be working! Would appreciate tips!!!
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    (Original post by Classics_Teacher)
    Hi, I'm teaching the Tacitus set text this year for the 1st year students of the new reformed specification. What I find works best with my students to translate the text is to break it down into smaller chunks which they translate roughly for homework. We then go through a better translation in class and look at stylistic points. About once every half term, we have a short test on a section done in that half term which asks them to (a) translate a bit of the chunk and (b) comment on the rest of it.

    Unfortunately, it really is a case of just learning the text really well, both in terms of knowing your translation and also the stylistic elements, since that's where most of the marks are to be found.

    There are a few resources which I can recommend if anyone's interested, so by all means PM me and I'll see what I can find.
    I'd be interested to know how you are teaching them to learn the texts. Similar to you, my teachers say 'It is a case of learning the texts' but how exactly do I do that?
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    I'm not doing Tacitus but for my set text, I find it helpful to get lots of colours and underline the corresponding Latin and English so you can see how it fits together. If there's vocab I don't know then I'll write it out in a separate book and try to learn it as if it were on the vocab list.
    For grammar, I know it sounds tedious but really learning the endings and the principle parts. I didn't realise how much of a difference it made because I just always knew them in Latin but with my Greek, I don't know them and really wish I had learned them before as it really seems like an uphill battle now! Doing as many practice sentences as possible just to get to grips with all the little bits of grammar really helps me! And also trying to use different books as they have different vocab lists which will help, I'm sure, next year when there is no defined vocab list
    Hope you're enjoying the Virgil
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    I think that it varies from student to student in terms of learning the Latin. Some of my students prefer to make word lists and write out an English translation, and then try to work out the Latin with the word lists as they come to revise, with reference to the translation when they get stuck. Others prefer to double-space the Latin text and write a translation underneath, so that the translation roughly corresponds to the Latin text in terms of placement.

    Then in terms of the style notes, some students prefer to have text/translation on one side of an exercise book/ring binder and notes on the facing page. Others prefer to have a block of notes after each chapter.

    Similarly, there are some useful guides out there. ZigZag produce some excellent ones, although they are free from copyright so schools only need to buy one master copy and as such they are quite expensive. http://zigzageducation.co.uk/teachin...r-classics.asp

    Likewise, Classical Workbooks also produce some useful set text guides http://www.classicalworkbooks.com/ and are more reasonably priced.
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    (Original post by Classics_Teacher)
    I think that it varies from student to student in terms of learning the Latin. Some of my students prefer to make word lists and write out an English translation, and then try to work out the Latin with the word lists as they come to revise, with reference to the translation when they get stuck. Others prefer to double-space the Latin text and write a translation underneath, so that the translation roughly corresponds to the Latin text in terms of placement.

    Then in terms of the style notes, some students prefer to have text/translation on one side of an exercise book/ring binder and notes on the facing page. Others prefer to have a block of notes after each chapter.

    Similarly, there are some useful guides out there. ZigZag produce some excellent ones, although they are free from copyright so schools only need to buy one master copy and as such they are quite expensive. http://zigzageducation.co.uk/teachin...r-classics.asp

    Likewise, Classical Workbooks also produce some useful set text guides http://www.classicalworkbooks.com/ and are more reasonably priced.
    I've been working over my Tacitus for this half term, and I've mostly got it pinned down, but this one little section defeats me, and my given translation seem to be a little liberal to actually understand what attaches to what. At the beginning of paragraph 24 (is that what they are called, or does it have a particular name like books for poetry?), 'haec audita quamquam abstrusum et tristissima quaeque maxime occultantem Tiberium perpulere'. That central part seems random to me, and I can't figure it out at all!
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    (Original post by Aear)
    'haec audita quamquam abstrusum et tristissima quaeque maxime occultantem Tiberium perpulere'.
    'haec audita' is an ablative absolute, with 'verba' understood: 'Having heard these things/these words/this news'.

    'quaeque' is often used after the superlative to express universality, so here 'tristissima quaeque' = 'every very serious thing' (disaster is perhaps a better translation here, given the context).

    'perpulere' is an example of a contracted 3rd person plural perfect ending, rather than an infinitive which is what it looks like. Therefore = 'perpulērunt'

    Then you have the name [Tiberium] in the accusative.

    Does this help at all?!
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    (Original post by Classics_Teacher)
    'haec audita' is an ablative absolute, with 'verba' understood: 'Having heard these things/these words/this news'.

    'quaeque' is often used after the superlative to express universality, so here 'tristissima quaeque' = 'every very serious thing' (disaster is perhaps a better translation here, given the context).

    'perpulere' is an example of a contracted 3rd person plural perfect ending, rather than an infinitive which is what it looks like. Therefore = 'perpulērunt'

    Then you have the name [Tiberium] in the accusative.

    Does this help at all?!
    I understand what you mean here, but I can't fathom the 'quamquam abstrusum et tristissima quaeque maxime occultantem' at all. I've got now idea even how to put it together!
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    (Original post by Aear)
    our previous Latin teacher left last year, he gave myself and a friend a bunch of blank set texts (those fantastic booklets),
    Hi
    Just wondered if that teacher happened to give you booklets on Cicero: Pro Milone or Aeneid VIII? Need some desperate help for literature and those are my set texts!
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    (Original post by sophiela09)
    Hi
    Just wondered if that teacher happened to give you booklets on Cicero: Pro Milone or Aeneid VIII? Need some desperate help for literature and those are my set texts!
    I'm afraid I don't have any for those set texts: the first thing I did when I went into the sixth form and learnt about the possible set texts was to scour my own, my friend's and the schools supply, and I found none for any set texts, except for one on the Tacitus Annals 1 16-32 (of which I am doing 16-30) but you yourself are not (I'm not sure what Pro Milone is like, but be happy it's not Tacitus). If you or your school's got some money to spare, then perhaps consider buying some of the OCR endorsed resources (they're mentioned on the spec and can be bought on Amazon for example). I've got the Tacitus one and Virgil Aeneid VIII arrived just today, and they're generally quite useful. My teacher also raves about some resource called ZigZag, which he claims is excellent when it comes to set text notes, and he' apparently finally managed to get them for Tacitus at least. If he also gets Virgil, I'll see if I can pass them onto you (he's buying for the set texts we're doing, so no Cicero I'm afraid).
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    (Original post by Aear)
    If you or your school's got some money to spare, then perhaps consider buying some of the OCR endorsed resources (they're mentioned on the spec and can be bought on Amazon for example). I've got the Tacitus one and Virgil Aeneid VIII arrived just today, and they're generally quite useful. My teacher also raves about some resource called ZigZag, which he claims is excellent when it comes to set text notes, and he' apparently finally managed to get them for Tacitus at least. If he also gets Virgil, I'll see if I can pass them onto you (he's buying for the set texts we're doing, so no Cicero I'm afraid).
    I've got the OCR ones, I've just found them not enough really. Just had a look at the zigzag ones though and they look amazing! I've emailed a teacher about them but if they decide not to invest then a copy of your Aeneid one (if you get one) would be so good
 
 
 
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