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    Hi everyone. I'm looking for some advice.

    In the future, I'd really like to become a university lecturer. However, I'm not sure that I'll be able to fund myself throughout my PG studies. My 'back-up' career would be secondary teaching, which also appeals to me, just not quite as much as lecturing.

    I'm going to work for a year (Sep 07 - Sep 08) in order to help fund my MA (in English Lit) and reckon I'll be able to pay off my overdraft and save around 4-6K. I'm also going to apply for funding from the AHRC, and think I should stand a reasonable chance as I got a First and finished top of my year - though I realise it's still very difficult to earn funding.

    My plan was to study for my MA in 2008-09 and then reassess my financial situation and decide whether to undertake a PhD or, alternatively, do a PGCE and go into secondary teaching (from what I can gather, you receive a lot more financial aid for a PGCE than you do for an MA or PhD).

    Basically, I was wondering whether this is the most sensible plan - or would I be better off doing a PGCE first and then an MA? Or is it simply too expensive to do both an MA and PGCE - maybe I should forget the MA/PhD and just go straight down the teaching route?

    My main concern is that I'll do my MA, start a PhD, run into financial trouble and end up having to work in a non-teaching job to pay off debts.

    Any help or advice would be much appreciated. Thanks.
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    You can get loans from banks specifically for continuing studies, that you don't have to start repaying until after you have finished studying. Alternatively, work a year, do the MA, and then work another year to fund you through your PhD. You could ask the lecturers how they managed to fund themselves through all of that, or possibly see if any universities are willing to sponsor you through the PhD, and then you going to work for them. Don't know whether this ever happens, but you could look into it.
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    I think I would skip the MA and do the 3 year Phd.

    If cash is going to be an issue then why not do the PGCE, enjoy teaching for a few years to get the bank balance up and then go for the Phd/ lecture route.
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    (Original post by Mrm.)
    I think I would skip the MA and do the 3 year Phd.
    You can't.

    If cash is going to be an issue then why not do the PGCE, enjoy teaching for a few years to get the bank balance up and then go for the Phd/ lecture route.
    Possible, although you may struggle to get back in academia if you leave it too long (depending on what exactly you want to do). Getting lectureships is not easy in the arts, even for people with bags of research and teaching experience.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    You can't.
    That simply isn't true.
    example:http://www.lamp.ac.uk/english/postgrad.html



    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Possible, although you may struggle to get back in academia if you leave it too long (depending on what exactly you want to do). Getting lectureships is not easy in the arts, even for people with bags of research and teaching experience.
    again please refer to http://www.lamp.ac.uk/english/postgrad.html
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    (Original post by Mrm.)
    That simply isn't true.
    example:http://www.lamp.ac.uk/english/postgrad.html

    again please refer to http://www.lamp.ac.uk/english/postgrad.html
    You can't enrol directly on a PhD programme without an MA, it is quite clearly stated in the links. You have to do the extra year anyway regardless of whether you actually get the qualification at the end of it.

    However, the AHRC which funds most of the PhD's in this area seems to be quite clear about this:

    http://www.ahrb.ac.uk/apply/postgrad..._questions.asp



    (Original post by AHRC)

    Can I apply for a Doctoral award without any formal Postgraduate qualification, e.g. a Masters degree?

    If you do not have experience of formal postgraduate study, you may apply for an award only if you can demonstrate in your application evidence of sustained experience beyond first degree level that is specifically relevant to your proposed research topic. You will need to justify in your application why this qualifies you exceptionally as prepared for doctoral research without prior formal postgraduate training.


    This may be the case particularly if you have gained experience in an area of practice-based research (e.g. Fine Art, creative writing or the performing arts). If you have only just completed your undergraduate course and intend to proceed directly to a PhD without undertaking a Master's degree or any substantial, relevant professional experience, you are unlikely to be successful in gaining an award.
    Although Lampeter may let you on an english lit PhD without an MA (via MPhil and an extra year), the chances of you being able to get funding are highly limited without one, unless you have 'exceptional' experience and only in certain areas. Not many people I know could afford to support themselves through a PhD full-time. So effectively, in most cases, especially this one, you can't get directly onto a PhD programme, because you won't be able to get the funding.
 
 
 
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